1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Courses Fall 2018

Full Course Descriptions:

ANTH 1010     INTRO. TO ANTHROPOLOGY     3.0     HANDLER
MW 4:00-4:50 PM

This course is an overview of key themes and theory in cultural anthropology. It is meant to provide students with the analytical and methodological tools to critically consider cultural difference, social organization, and social change. Themes include: anthropological methods, kinship, gender, religion, colonization, media, pop cultures, consumption, medicine, media, globalization, and post-modernity.

ANTH 2230     FANTASY AND SOCIAL VALUES     3.0     WAGNER
TR 9:30-10:45 AM

An examination of imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Attention is given to "alternate cultures" and fictional societal models. A "cultural imaginary" allow us to think carefully about implications of gender, technology, and social existence that we, for very good reasons, are not allowed to experiment upon. Three papers, mandatory attendance in lecture.

ANTH 2040   HOW TO DO ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELD RESEARCH   3.0   BASHKOW
W 5:00-7:30 PM

How do you study people outside researcher-created contexts like labs and surveys, in the regular activities and settings of their own lives? This course introduces students to the theory, ethics, practice, and applications of ethnographic field research, or “fieldwork,” which is valued in diverse fields like public health, development, design, planning, management, marketing, and education.

ANTH 2250   NATIONALISM, RACISM, MULTICULTURALISM  3.0  HANDLER
TR 3:30-4:45 PM

Introductory course in which the concepts of culture, multiculturalism, race, racism, and nationalism are critically examined in terms of how they are used and structure social relations in American society and, by comparison, how they are defined in other cultures throughout the world.

ANTH 2280   MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY   3.0   SCHERZ
MW 9:00-9:50 AM

This course is an introduction to rapidly expanding subfield of Medical Anthropology. It will teach students to analyze how social, cultural, political, and economic factors impact the body and how these factors shape the ways different people understand, experience, and respond to states of health and disease. In addition to exploring the medical systems of other cultures, we will also reflect on biomedicine as a cultural artifact. Given the growing interest in global health and the diversity of the American population this course may be of special use to students interested in pursuing careers in health care and international development.

ANTH 2285   ANTHROPOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT AND HUMANITARIANISM  3.0  TIDEY
MW 3:30-4:45 PM

"Over the second-half of the 20th century development and humanitarianism largely came to replace colonialism and mission as the dominant forms of international engagement.  In this course we will explore the production and representation of development and humanitarianism as subjects and objects along with the politics and anti-politics of intervention.  In so doing, we will map the historical contexts and contentious contemporary practices of these distinct, but related, modes of world saving."

ANTH 2400   LANGUAGE AND CULTURE   3.0   SICOLI
MW 10:00-10:50

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Course includes a plus obligatory discussion section. 

ANTH 2430  LANGUAGES OF THE WORLD   3.0   BEER
TR 9:00-9:50 AM

An introduction to the study of language relationships and linguistic structures.  Topics covered the basic elements of grammatical description; genetic, areal, and typological relationships among languages; a survey of the world's major language groupings and the notable structures and grammatical categories they exhibit; and the issue of language endangerment. Prerequisite: One year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

ANTH 2589   HERITAGE, CONSERVATION AND COMMUNITY  3.0   BALTALI TIRPAN
WF 12:00-12:50 PM

Particular events, places, monuments, objects, natural and archaeological sites, built spaces and landmarks can be meaningful to people in the present and at the same time they can be forgotten, erased and destroyed. Heritage becomes a source of identification, signification and memorialization. Heritage is deeply related to materiality as it is the physical embodiment of the past in the present. The multiple ‘pasts’ transformed into heritage in the present can represent locality, culture, identity, ethnicity, indigenous, local and national histories. In this course, through theoretical readings, case-studies and documentary films, we will investigate the processes of heritage production, conservation and destruction. We will particularly examine the experience of local communities and indigenous peoples within these processes.

ANTH 2590  CULTURE, MENTAL HEALTH AND BIOMEDICINE  3.0   BURRAWAY
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

An exploration into mental health from a cross-cultural perspective, engaging with anthropological critiques of the biomedical paradigm throughout. We investigate how culture structures mental health and in particular how it frames treatment options for those affected. We will also investigate how sociocultural and political forces intersect with individual psychology and (neuro)biology to constitute experiences of mental suffering and recovery.

ANTH 2800    INTRO. TO ARCHAEOLOGY    3.0    PALAZZO
MW 9:00-9:50 AM

Anthropological archaeology, which is the focus of this class, contributes to anthropology more broadly through the study of past societies very different from our own. Through research, archaeologists (re-)construct the broad sweep of human experience and history, mostly before the advent of written records. Combining often humanistic questions on one hand, and mostly scientific methods on the other, archaeology offers perspectives on such things as daily life, religion, economy, and social relations in the past through the systematic analysis of artifacts, faunal and botanical remains, structures, and landscapes. Archaeology is quite visible to the public, and it is fascinating. But how does it actually work? What are archaeology’s unique contributions to our knowledge of the deep and more recent past? This survey course attempts to provide you with answers to these questions.

ANTH 3010    THEORY & HISTORY ANTHROPOLOGY    3.0    BASHKOW
TR 12:00-12:50 PM

This course is designed for students who are majoring in anthropology. It presents a broad historical outline of major theoretical approaches in the field, from the late 19th century to the present. These approaches will be examined in relation to both evolving debates within the discipline, and the larger historical, cultural and intellectual contexts in which they were produced, and which they to some degree reflect; we will also discuss the enduring relevance of these theories. The course stresses close reading of primary texts and emphasizes in particular the critical analysis of these texts' arguments. The discussion section is obligatory. This is a required course for anthropology majors.

ANTH 3152    AMAZONIAN PEOPLES    3.0    MENTORE
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

Analyzes ethnographies on the cultures and the societies of the South American rain forest peoples, and evaluates the scholarly ways in which anthropology has produced, engaged, interpreted, and presented its knowledge of the 'Amerindian.'

ANTH 3155    ANTHROPOLOGY OF EVERYDAY AMERICAN LIFE    3.0    DAMON
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

Taking a production and exchange orientation to society, this course uses anthropological models to analyze aspects of the US experience in North America and its extension into the world. The models draw from the anthropological analysis of exchange, rites of transition and sacrifice, and the analysis of mythology. Although introduced by issues from the immediate questions of American culture, the course has a serious historical orientation. It runs from our 18th century foundation up to contemporary crises. Students will write several response papers (2-4 pages/) and one longer paper (10+/_ pages) moving towards a synthesis of the course or a research proposal built out of the response papers but involving modest additional library or ethnographic research. Monday and Wednesdays are lecture days, Fridays devoted to Damon-led discussion. There will be no tests but occasional quizzes. The course should satisfy Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 3240   ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD   3.0  KHARE
M 3:30-6:00 PM

By exploring food and eating in relationship to such topics as taboo, sexuality, bodies, ritual, kinship, beauty, and temperance and excess, this course will help students to investigate the way the foods people eat--or don't eat--hold meaning for people within multiple cultural contexts.

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Major Area Requirements

 

ANTH 3290  BIOPOLITICS AND THE CONTEMPORTY CONDITION   3.0   SEALE-FELDMAN
W 3:30-6:00 PM

Biopolitical analysis has become one of the prominent critical approaches across the social sciences and humanities.  This course will consider various biopolitical theories and the ways in which they help us understand diverse phenomena of our contemporary condition, which will be examined through various case studies.

ANTH 3310  CONTROVERSIES OF CARE IN CONTEMPORARY AFRICA   3.0   SCHERZ
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

In this course, we will draw on a series of classic and contemporary works in history and anthropology to come to a better understanding of current debates concerning questions of care in contemporary Africa. Moving out from a set of conversations related to the establishment and maintenance of multiple ties of belonging and hierarchical interdependence, this course will examine the ways controversial questions related to care and power cut across a series of interrelated themes (1) witchcraft and corruption, (2) marriage, gender, and sexuality, and (3) medicine and healing.

ANTH 3395   MYTHODOLOGY    3.0   WAGNER
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

Mythodology: A participatory crash-course in the obviation skill set: how to “solve” a myth or story as if it were a topological mind-puzzle. All the student is required to do is furnish a myth or story of their own choosing, analyze it in class presentation, and prepare a final paper on the subject. Class attendance mandatory.

ANTH 3470  LANGUAGE AND CULTURE OF THE MIDDLE EAST   3.0   LEFKOWITZ
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with MEST 3470. Prerequisite: Previous course in anthropology, linguistics, Middle East Studies or permission of instructor.

ANTH 3559  HUMAN CRUELTY AND ITS DOUBLE   3.0   MENTORE
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

A cross cultural exposure to felt reality by way of ethnographic descriptions.  This course will attune, in particular, to the fact that any such genre of storytelling pertains simultaneously to an act of witnessing and to a deliverance of judgement.  Both the witness and their judgement deploy the narrative heroic in ways which obscure and present the villain in implicated practices of cruelty. 

ANTH 4591-01    HIERARCHY AND EQUIALITY IN HEALTH CULTURES  3.0  KHARE
W 3:30-6:00 PM

Provides an anthropological perspective on relations of inequality, subordination, and class in diverse societies, along with consideration of American ideas of egalitarianism, meritocracy, and individualism. Specific topics will be announced prior to each semester.

ANTH 4591-02    THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF ADDICTION  3.0  BURRAWAY
W 5:00-7:30 PM

This is course explores the use of psychoactive drugs in varying ethnographic settings, and in particular how these substances problematize contemporary understandings of addiction, selfhood, time, criminality, and biopower. We consider how anthropology has grappled with the ubiquity of drugs and alcohol across human culture, at the same time asking to what extent ethnography can help us capture the complexity of intoxicated experience.

 

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Major Area Requirements

 

ANTH 5220    ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY   3.0   DAMON
MW 6:00-7:15 PM

Organized in four parts, this course introduces students to anthropologically useful ideas in marxism and world-system theory, the use and transformation of ‘exchange theory’ over the last 100 years, and research in newer versions of ecological anthropology/historical ecology as it bears on the social nature of production. A comparative question raised by a version of historical ecology will be introduced in the initial moments of the course so it may be pursued throughout the historical trajectory we necessarily take from the Marx/world-system theory couplet. The concluding part on ecological historical orientations will sample recent work addressing what some call ‘materiality,’ as well as the new old pursuit, the analysis of infrastructures: A great deal of this new work derives from the perspective taught in the marxism and exchange sectors of the course. Students are expected to come away with initial introductions to each of these areas. Everyone will write one 5-10 page paper/section. However, the last paper should bend toward the student’s intended research questions, topically or regionally defined and may go to 15 pages. Individualized oral reports on tangential readings are required and will enable students to structure aspects of the course more to their primary interests. A special emphasis running through many if not all sections will concern the organization of regionalism: how are spatial dimensions of social systems experienced and conceived. Synchronic and diachronic models from the Indo-Pacific in general and China and the Kula Ring in particular will anchor this aspect of the course. Student interest in any other major region of the world is encouraged—e.g. Central Asia, Africa, the Mediterranean-to-the-Khyber-Pass, any or all of the Americas. Although designed for graduate students, mature undergraduates are encouraged to consider the course to round out their undergraduate careers and help define their futures—you won’t be the first to have done this.

ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Regional dimensions on the anthropological analysis of social production and exchange.

ANTH 5240  RELATIONAL ETHICS   3.0   ZIGON
R 3:30-6:00 PM

How might we begin to conceive a relational ethics? In the attempt to think through this question, we will slowly read and discuss some important texts in anthropology and continental philosophy that have attempted to think and articulate relationality, being-with and ethics.

ANTH 5425  LANGUAGE CONTACT   3.0   SICOLI
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

This course considers how languages change when participating in histories of contact between and within social groups. Because a language is itself a complex and multilayered set of practices composing parts like words, which can be consciously borrowed (or avoided), and prosodic and grammatical processes that are often less accessible to consciousness, the study of language contact is one that brings human cognition together with historical and social processes. Languages have been in contact with each other by means of social interaction and speaker multilingualism throughout human history. Thus, the study of language contact provides an important vantage on the past. Yet the accelerating effects of globalization make its study especially relevant for understanding language change in our contemporary world. In this course we will consider ways that speaker and listener beliefs, practices, and attitudes can influence the structure of languages and habits of speech. We will examine cases of institutionalized multilingualism and code switching, diverse and superdiverse sociolinguistic ecologies, the borrowing of words, the influence of grammatical systems as mediated by, and affected by, histories of social interactions and structured human relations. We will study linguistic areas, the emergence and structure of pidgin, creole, and intertwined "contact" languages, language endangerment, language loss, and revitalizatioun, and discuss new methods of computational phylogenetics and network analysis applied to study language and history. Through our focus on language contact this course will help you develop an understanding of how the material of languages we inherit from the particular histories and social responses to ethnic, colonial, state, and economic grounded interactions relate to social, cultural, and cognitive universals of human language.

ANTH 5485  DISCOURSE ANALYSIS   3.0   LEFKOWITZ
R 3:30-6:00 PM

This course introduces the field and methods of discourse analysis. The course will be run in lab (or workshop) fashion, focusing on a hands-on learning through joint analysis of samples of actual discourse. Participants are expected to complete a discourse analysis project during the semester that involves collection of discourse data, empirical analysis of that data, and theoretical interpretation that links the details of discourse structure to broader issues of social and cultural formation. Part of this assignment is to share the data, analysis and interpretation with the seminar as a whole. Instructor permission required.

ANTH 5541   LINGUISTIC TYPOLOGY   3.0    BEER
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

TBA

ANTH 5549  LANGUAGE SOCIALIZATION   3.0   DOBRIN
R 5:00-7:30 PM

There is more involved in “learning a language” than acquiring knowledge of its grammatical structures; one also becomes an appropriate and skillful user of language as one is socialized, through communicative encounters with others, into becoming a competent member of a speech community. This course explores the topic of language socialization to reveal how language use at every level—from sound patterns to lexical choices to conversational routines—can contribute to learners’ understandings of what speech is and how it functions. At the same time, socializing encounters shape learners’ understandings of who they are and how they should act or feel, thereby serving as a locus for the transmission of culture. Readings will be drawn from diverse settings and regions of the world. Special attention will be given to language shift and other situations of social change and disjuncture. Course work will involve keeping up with the readings, participating in class discussion, and writing a paper on an individual topic of interest chosen in consultation with the instructor.

ANTH 5590  INDIGENOUS LANDSCAPES   3.0   IGOE
T 3:30-6:00 PM

Indigenous landscapes are spaces of cultural production, land rights advocacy, and environmental care.  They are essential to indigenous sovereignty, and the material and symbolic ground of contested futures. Focusing on landscapes in Africa, Australia, and North America, we will explore their connections to art, media, and related imaginaries, global social movements, and potential solutions to current socio-ecological crises.

ANTH 5808  METHODS AND THEORY IN ARCHAEOLOGY   3.0  WATTENMAKER
R 6:00-8:30 PM

Investigates current theory, models, and research methods in anthropological archaeology.

ANTH 5870  ARCHAEOZOOLOGY   3.0   WATTENMAKER
M 3:30-6:00 PM

Laboratory training in techniques and methods used in analyzing animal bones recovered from archaeological sites. Include field collection, data analysis, and the use of zooarchaeological materials in reconstructing economic and social systems.

 


Back to courses offered

Course Number Index

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:


Prin. of Social Analysis   Archaeology Linguistics

2040,2230,2250,2280,2285,2590,3152,
3155,3240,3310,3395,3559,3590,5220,5240

  2800,2589,5870 2400,2430,3470,5409,5425,5485,5541,5549

Major Requirements
1010,2010/3010,4591-01,4591-02

Beyond the West
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern requirement)
2285,2590,3152,3310,3590,2430,3470

Senior Seminars
4591-01,4591-02


Graduate Courses


5220 
ECONOMICS ANTHROPOLOGY
5409
ACOUSTIC PHONETICS
5425
LANGUAGE CONTACT
5485
DISCOURSE ANALYSIS
5541
LINGUISTC TYPOLOGY
5549
LANGUAGE SOCIALIZATON

5240

RELATIONAL ETHICS
5590
INDIGENOUS LANDSCAPES
5808
THEORY IN ARCHAEOLOGY

5870

ZOOARCHAEOLOGY
7010
HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY THEORY
7060
DISSERTATION PROPOSAL WORKSHOP
7380
NATURE OF NATURE
7400
LINGUSTIC ANTHROPOLOGY
7470
LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST

 


Full Course Descriptions:

 

ANTH 5220    ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY   3.0   DAMON
MW 6:00-7:15 PM

Organized in four parts, this course introduces students to anthropologically useful ideas in marxism and world-system theory, the use and transformation of ‘exchange theory’ over the last 100 years, and research in newer versions of ecological anthropology/historical ecology as it bears on the social nature of production. A comparative question raised by a version of historical ecology will be introduced in the initial moments of the course so it may be pursued throughout the historical trajectory we necessarily take from the Marx/world-system theory couplet. The concluding part on ecological historical orientations will sample recent work addressing what some call ‘materiality,’ as well as the new old pursuit, the analysis of infrastructures: A great deal of this new work derives from the perspective taught in the marxism and exchange sectors of the course. Students are expected to come away with initial introductions to each of these areas. Everyone will write one 5-10 page paper/section. However, the last paper should bend toward the student’s intended research questions, topically or regionally defined and may go to 15 pages. Individualized oral reports on tangential readings are required and will enable students to structure aspects of the course more to their primary interests. A special emphasis running through many if not all sections will concern the organization of regionalism: how are spatial dimensions of social systems experienced and conceived. Synchronic and diachronic models from the Indo-Pacific in general and China and the Kula Ring in particular will anchor this aspect of the course. Student interest in any other major region of the world is encouraged—e.g. Central Asia, Africa, the Mediterranean-to-the-Khyber-Pass, any or all of the Americas. Although designed for graduate students, mature undergraduates are encouraged to consider the course to round out their undergraduate careers and help define their futures—you won’t be the first to have done this.

ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Regional dimensions on the anthropological analysis of social production and exchange.

ANTH 5240  RELATIONAL ETHICS   3.0   ZIGON
R 3:30-6:00 PM

How might we begin to conceive a relational ethics? In the attempt to think through this question, we will slowly read and discuss some important texts in anthropology and continental philosophy that have attempted to think and articulate relationality, being-with and ethics.

ANTH 5425  LANGUAGE CONTACT  3.0   SICOLI
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

This course considers how languages change when participating in histories of contact between and within social groups. Because a language is itself a complex and multilayered set of practices composing parts like words, which can be consciously borrowed (or avoided), and prosodic and grammatical processes that are often less accessible to consciousness, the study of language contact is one that brings human cognition together with historical and social processes. Languages have been in contact with each other by means of social interaction and speaker multilingualism throughout human history. Thus, the study of language contact provides an important vantage on the past. Yet the accelerating effects of globalization make its study especially relevant for understanding language change in our contemporary world. In this course we will consider ways that speaker and listener beliefs, practices, and attitudes can influence the structure of languages and habits of speech. We will examine cases of institutionalized multilingualism and code switching, diverse and superdiverse sociolinguistic ecologies, the borrowing of words, the influence of grammatical systems as mediated by, and affected by, histories of social interactions and structured human relations. We will study linguistic areas, the emergence and structure of pidgin, creole, and intertwined "contact" languages, language endangerment, language loss, and revitalizatioun, and discuss new methods of computational phylogenetics and network analysis applied to study language and history. Through our focus on language contact this course will help you develop an understanding of how the material of languages we inherit from the particular histories and social responses to ethnic, colonial, state, and economic grounded interactions relate to social, cultural, and cognitive universals of human language.

ANTH 5485  DISCOURSE ANALYSIS   3.0   LEFKOWITZ
R 3:30-6:00 PM

This course introduces the field and methods of discourse analysis. The course will be run in lab (or workshop) fashion, focusing on a hands-on learning through joint analysis of samples of actual discourse. Participants are expected to complete a discourse analysis project during the semester that involves collection of discourse data, empirical analysis of that data, and theoretical interpretation that links the details of discourse structure to broader issues of social and cultural formation. Part of this assignment is to share the data, analysis and interpretation with the seminar as a whole. Instructor permission required.

ANTH 5541   LINGUISTIC TYPOLOGY   3.0    TBA
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

TBA

ANTH 5549  LANGUAGE SOCIALIZATION   3.0   DOBRIN
R 5:00-7:30 PM

There is more involved in “learning a language” than acquiring knowledge of its grammatical structures; one also becomes an appropriate and skillful user of language as one is socialized, through communicative encounters with others, into becoming a competent member of a speech community. This course explores the topic of language socialization to reveal how language use at every level—from sound patterns to lexical choices to conversational routines—can contribute to learners’ understandings of what speech is and how it functions. At the same time, socializing encounters shape learners’ understandings of who they are and how they should act or feel, thereby serving as a locus for the transmission of culture. Readings will be drawn from diverse settings and regions of the world. Special attention will be given to language shift and other situations of social change and disjuncture. Course work will involve keeping up with the readings, participating in class discussion, and writing a paper on an individual topic of interest chosen in consultation with the instructor.

ANTH 5590  INDIGENOUS LANDSCAPES  3.0   IGOE
T 3:30-6:00 PM

Indigenous landscapes are spaces of cultural production, land rights advocacy, and environmental care.  They are essential to indigenous sovereignty, and the material and symbolic ground of contested futures. Focusing on landscapes in Africa, Australia, and North America, we will explore their connections to art, media, and related imaginaries, global social movements, and potential solutions to current socio-ecological crises.

ANTH 5808  METHODS AND THEORY IN ARCHAEOLOGY   3.0  WATTENMAKER
R 6:00-8:30 PM

Investigates current theory, models, and research methods in anthropological archaeology.

ANTH 5870  ARCHAEOZOOLOGY   3.0   WATTENMAKER
M 3:30-6:00 PM

Laboratory training in techniques and methods used in analyzing animal bones recovered from archaeological sites. Include field collection, data analysis, and the use of zooarchaeological materials in reconstructing economic and social systems.

ANTH 7010     HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY THEORY   3.0   WESTON
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

Introduces major historical figures, approaches, and debates in anthropology (sociocultural, linguistic, archaeological), with a focus on understanding the discipline’s diverse intellectual history, and its complex involvement with dominant social and intellectual currents in western society.

ANTH 7060  DISSERTATION RESEARCH PROPOSAL WORKSHOP  3.0  LAVIOLETTE
T 6:00-8:30 PM

A workshop for graduates preparing dissertation proposals and writing grant applications. Each student prepares several drafts of a proposal, revising it at each stage in response to the criticisms of classmates and the instructor.

ANTH 7400  LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY   3.0   DANZIGER
T 3:30-6:00 PM

An advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically-oriented research. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, language and nationalism, universals and particulars in language, language in history and prehistory, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation, and the study of poetic language. The course is required for all Anthropology graduate students. It also counts toward the Theory requirement for the M.A. in Linguistics.

ANTH 7470  LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST   3.0  LEFKOWITZ
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

This course provides an introduction to the people, cultures, and histories of the Middle East, through an examination of language-use in contemporary Middle Eastern societies. The course focuses on Israel/Palestine, and the contact between Hebrew and Arabic, as a microcosm providing insight into important social processes-such as colonization, religious fundamentalism, modernization, and the changing status of women-affecting the region as a whole. Readings contrast ethnographic with novelistic representations of language, society, and identity. A primary concern will be to compare social scientific and literary constructions of self and other in the context of the political and military confrontation between Israel and Palestine. This is a lecture and discussion course. A number of feature films from the Middle East are incorporated into the course material. Requirements include four short essays and a book review. Prerequisite: previous course in anthropology, linguistics, or Middle Eastern studies; or permission of the instructor.