1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Courses Spring 2017

 


Undergraduate Courses
(meet major area requirements)


See Major Area Requirements

Full Course Descriptions:

ANTH 1010     INTRO. TO ANTHROPOLOGY     3.0     ARMENGOL
MW 1100-1150 AM

This course introduces students to the methods, perspectives, and motivations used by anthropologists to study the range and significance of human existence. Students are challenged to follow the way anthropologists approach a research topic, design a question, collect data, and ultimately discuss results via publication. The course surveys the four sub-fields of anthropology (linguistic anthropology, socio-cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and archaeology) through a combination of texts, multimedia, and guest lectures. The goal of this course is to equip students with an analytical framework which allows the objective appreciation of non-Western languages, social structures, histories and belief systems.

ANTH 1050     ANTHROPOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION   3.0     BASHKOW
MW 3:30-4:20 PM 

The Anthropology of Globalization introduces the social and cultural aspects of global integration. While human communities have always been connected to one another in important ways, recent history has seen a quickening of transportation and communication, increasing the circulation of people, objects, and ideas across significant distances. In this course, we will explore the human side of this circulation: how does it shape people's experiences, and how is it shaped in turn by people's understandings of what is possible, desirable, or inevitable. We will read ethnographic studies of people who are engaged in or responding to global forces and processes. How are global connections contributing to the complexity and interdependence of diverse human cultures? What new forms of social, political, economic, and religious networks are emerging? What kinds of disconnection, exclusion, and inequality? Topics addressed in the course will include the early history of global commodities in imperialism, the cultural specificity of economic markets and trade, the cultural roles of big business and NGOs, the experience of workers in global supply chains, the tension between the local and the cosmopolitan in emerging forms of consumer culture and middle class affluence, illegal and informal economies, neoliberalism and financialization, bor migration, totourism and voluntourism, approaches to lessening poverty and marketing to the "bottom of the pyramid," and the global circulation of music, arts, and performed cultural heritage. We will consider how ideas about globalization themselves circulate and how they are diversely framed from different political, economic, and cultural viewpoints. How are ideas of the "global" and "globalization" used to describe the world as well as to change it? How do global processes look when viewed from above and when viewed from below?

ANTH 2210   MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY   3.0   TBA
MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

This course compares domestic groups in Western and non-Western societies. Considers the kinds of sexual unions legitimized in different cultures, patterns of childrearing, causes and effects of divorce, and the changing relations between the family and society

ANTH 2270   RACE, GENDER, AND MEDICAL SCIENCE   3.0   FRASER
TR 12:30-1:20 PM

TBA

ANTH 2280     MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY     3.0     DOUGLASS
TR 4:00-5:15 PM

Medical Anthropology is a growing and important new subfield within general anthropology. Medical Anthropology compares different cultures' ideas about illness and curing. Although disease is a concept referring to a pathological condition of the body in which functioning is disturbed, illness is a cultural concept: a condition marked by deviation from what is considered a normal, healthy state. Treatment of illness in Western industrial societies focuses on curing specific diseased organs or controlling a specific virus. In many so-called "traditional" societies greater emphasis is placed on the social and psychological dimensions of illness. In this course we will learn that different cultures, even in the United States (i.e., Hispanic, Asian, American Indian, African American, etc.), have different ways to talk about illness, and that the American medical community is at times as "culture bound" as anywhere. “Science" does not stand outside culture.

ANTH 2325  ANTHROPOLOGY OF GOD   3.0   MENTORE
MW 3:30-4:20 PM

How does the study of society and culture create an intellectual space for any explanation and experience of the Divine? How does anthropology deal specifically with explaining (rather than the explaining away) knowledge and understanding about divinity? Is God an American? If God has a gender and race, what are they? Is God a necessary yet powerful figment of our collective human imagination? Can God be subordinated to humankind? What powers if any does divinity possess? Does any such talk about God reduce our study to the accusation of being pornocratic anthropology? These and many other pertinent questions will be engaged and tackled in this cross-cultural course on the study of the divine. 

ANTH 2360     DON JUAN AND CASTANEDA    3.0    WAGNER
TR 9:30-10:45 AM

Castaneda and Don Juan: “Cracking the Castaneda Code,” a hard “second look” at the supposedly “subjective” vistas of the Meso-American power-quest. Objectivity comes to the rescue of what was once thought to be America’s worse drug scandal. Nine books; three papers, no final exam. Class attendance mandatory.

ANTH 2365     ANTHROPOLOGY OF ART     3.0     DOUGLASS
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

The course will emphasize art in small-scale (contemporary) societies (sometimes called ethnic art or “primitive art”). It will include a survey of aesthetic productions of major areas throughout the world (Australia, Africa, Oceania, Native America, Meso-America). We will also read about and discuss such issues as art (and architecture) and cultural identity, tourist arts, anonymity, authenticity, the question of universal aesthetic cannons, exhibiting cultures, the difference between the bellas artes and arte popular, and the impact of globalization on these arts. The class will visit the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, the Inuit Study Gallery, the Fralin Museum storage facility on Millmont, and the Object Study Gallery at the UVA Art Museum. (The student should also try and travel to Washington D.C. to visit the National Museum of the American Indian and the National Museum of African Art [extra credit possible].)

ANTH 2375  DISASTER   3.0   WESTON
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

The sociocultural approach to the study of disaster highlighted in this course includes analysis of the manufacture of disaster, debates on societal collapse, disaster management discourse, apocalyptic thought, representations of disaster in film, the ways that disasters mobilize affect, and disaster as political allegory. Students will learn to apply analytic frameworks to a series of case studies from different societies of various "natural," industrial, and chronic disasters, as well as predictions of future disasters. Cases range from nineteenth-century famines to Hurricane Katrina, the Bhopal gas disaster, the nuclear meltdowns at Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, climate change catastrophism, computer modeling of specific disaster scenarios, and doomsday preparation.

 

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Major Area Requirements

 

 

ANTH 2430    LANGUAGE OF THE WORLD   3.0   DOBRIN
MW 10:00-10:50 AM

This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

ANTH 2559 LANGUAGE IN HUMAN EVOLUTION   3.0   SICOLI
MW 9:00-9:50 AM

Examines the evolution of our capacity for language along with the development of human ways of cooperating in engaged social interaction. Course integrates cognitive, cultural, social, and biological aspects of language in comparative perspective. How is the familiar shape of language today the result of evolutionary and developmental processes involving the form, function, meaning and use of signs and symbols in social ecologies? 

ANTH 2589-01  ARCHAEOLOGY: SLAVERY AND INDENTURE   3.0   HAINES
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

TBA

ANTH 2589-02  ENVIROMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY    3.0    EDWARDS
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
 

TBA

ANTH 2620 SEX, GENDER, AND CULTURE   3.0   TBA
TR 9:30-10:45 AM

TBA

ANTH 2625   IMAGINING AFRICA   3.0    IGOE
T 3:30-6:00 PM

Africa is commonly imagined in the West as an unproblematically bounded and undifferentiated entity. This course engages and moves beyond western traditions of storytelling about Africa to explore diverse systems of imagining Africa’s multi-diasporic realities. Imagining Africa is never a matter of pure abstraction, but entangled in material struggles and collective memory, and taking place at diverse and interconnected scales and locales.

ANTH 2820    EMERGENCE OF STATES AND CITIES   3.0   WATTENMAKER
TR 3:30-4:20 PM

This course explores the archaeology of early states and cities in both the Old (Mesopotamia and Egypt) and New (Teotihuacan, the Aztecs and the Maya) Worlds. We will discuss the ways that archaeologists learn about complex societies through fieldwork, laboratory research (including artifact analyses), texts, and ethnographic studies. Topics discussed include 1) the problematic concept of "civilization", 2) the origins of agriculture and its effects on society, 3) the shift from egalitarian societies to those with social ranking, 4) theories and evidence for the rise of state societies, 5) urbanism, 6) social, religious, political and economic life in early cities, 7) the beginnings of writing and 8) the collapse of complex societies. By highlighting the wide range of variability in pre-industrial societies, the course emphasizes the role of cultural values in shaping the organization of early societies. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement. It has been used in the past to satisfy requirements for Midde Eastern Studies and Latin American Studies (please check with the Program Director for approval).

ANTH 3020   USING ANTHROPOLOGY   3.0   HANTMAN
TR 2:00-3:15 PM 

The theoretical, methodological and ethical practice of an engaged anthropology is the subject of this course. We begin with a history of applied anthropology. We then examine case studies that demonstrate the unique practices and challenges of sociocultural, linguistic, archaeological and bioanthropological anthropology in the areas of contemporary policy and community and civic engagement.

ANTH 3130   DISEASE, EPIDEMICS AND SOCIETY  3.0  SHEPHERD
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

Topics covered in this course will include emerging diseases and leading killers in the twenty-first century, disease ecology, disease history and mortality transitions, the sociology of epidemics, the role of epidemiology in the mobilization of public health resources to confront epidemics, and the social processes by which the groups become stigmatized during disease outbreaks. This is a course that seeks to present a holistic view of global health by drawing on work crossing several disciplines, including anthropological demography, epidemiology, public health, disease history, genomic studies of disease pathogens, and medical anthropology.

ANTH 3240     ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD    3.0   KHARE
T 3:30-6:00 PM 

This course explores comparative local/global cultural and biocultural studies of the following four interdependent “food and food ways” areas: (a) a biocultural and ecological overview of the diverse human food ways; (b) a biocultural, nutritional and moral-religious study of milk and dairy use in US and India; (c) “uncovering hidden hunger”—abroad and in US; (d) experiencing, expressing, reporting “eating food  in America”; and (e) the cultural politics of dietary and health issues in today’s globalizing world. Accordingly, this course will allow us to learn transnationally and cross-culturally as much about “we are what we eat” as what are the looming larger—ecological, biocultural, mass technological and moral-religious—issues and forces impacting us via our foods and food ways.    

 

ANTH 3340    ECOLOGY AND SOCIETY    3.0    DAMON
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM 

Forges a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology to provide new insights on how human cultures fashion, and are fashioned by, their environment. Prerequisite: At least one Anthropology course, significant/relevant exposure to courses in EVSC, BIOL, CHEM, or HIST (which tie in to concerns of this course), or instructor permission.

ANTH 3370    POWER AND THE BODY    3.0    MENTORE
MW 11:00-11:50 AM 

"This course is designed for those students interested in how and why anthropology arrives at its own peculiar paradigms of identity about the Other from its own deeply embedded western cultural understandings of body and Self."

 

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Major Area Requirements

 

ANTH 3395    MYTHODOLOGY      3.0      WAGNER
TR 12:30-1:45 PM 

Mythodology: A participatory crash-course in the obviation skill set: how to “solve” a myth or story as if it were a topological mind-puzzle. All the student is required to do is furnish a myth or story of their own choosing, analyze it in class presentation, and prepare a final paper on the subject. Class attendance mandatory.

ANTH 3455   AFRICAN LANGUAGES  3.0  CONTINI-MORAVA
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

This course is an introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. For about three-fourths of the course we will discuss linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax) among a wide variety of languages; the classification of African languages; and the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory. For the last fourth of the course we will address a range of sociolinguistic topics, including language and social identity, the politics of language planning and policy, language contact and its effects, including multilingualism, language death/endangerment, and the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth. While lectures address general and comparative topics, each student will choose one language to focus on, using published materials available in the library. This language will be the basis for the major assignments. Some prior experience with linguistics is desirable (such as LNGS 3250/7010, ANTH 2400 or ANTH 7400), but the course will also be accessible to highly motivated students who have not taken a previous linguistics course.  For these students, supplementary readings on basic linguistics are included in the syllabus. 

ANTH 3470   LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST   3.0   LEFKOWITZ
TR 12:30-1:20 PM

TBA

ANTH 3490  LANGUAGE AND THOUGHT    3.0   DANZIGER
MF 11:00-11:50 AM

There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others to individuals? Can we learn about alternative ways of approaching the external world by studying other languages? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of recent cross-cultural psycholinguistic research. This class fulfills the Linguistics requirement for Anthropology and for Cognitive Science majors. It fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics majors.

ANTH 3559  AMERICAN UTOPIAN SOCIETIES   3.0   MCKINNON
MW 3:30-4:45 PM

This course explores the meaning and significance of American utopian societies--including such communities as the Shakers, Oneida, New Harmony, the Mormons, and the Fourierist Phalanxes--primarily from the 19th century up to the present.  In particular, we will explore how the impetus to reform political, economic, and religious relations also manifested itself in radical reconfigurations of relations of kinship, marriage, and gender.  Each student will conduct in-depth research on a utopian society of his or her choice.  

ANTH 3589  TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY   3.0   PLOG
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

TBA

 

ANTH 3590   INDIGENOUS NORTH AMERICAN ARTS   3.0    GREEN
R 1:00-3:30 PM

Indigenous North American Arts. (Introduction to art histories of indigenous North America and of collecting Native arts with close material analysis of objects in the Fralin museum collection.)

ANTH 3630  CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION   3.0  SHEPHERD
MW 3:30-4:45 PM

Prerequisite: Anthro 101 or equivalent social science or China-related course.  This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Heavy emphasis is on the ethnography from Taiwan where traditional forms have endured and been studied intensively. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of traditional Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety.  The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered.  Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in twentieth century Chinese life.

ANTH 3885 ARCHAEOLOGY OF EUROPE   3.0   LAVIOLETTE
TR 9:30-10:45 AM

This course surveys topics in the archaeology of Europe that cross-cut time periods, regions, and major transformations. We begin with the peopling of Europe and the ‘Neanderthal debate’; then move through interpretations of cave art and other early modern cultural achievements; emergence of settled village life and food production; megalithic monuments and motivations and technologies for building them; development of metal technology and the impact of metals on society; emergence of Bronze Age societies and urban centers; societies of Iron Age Europe; Roman relations with Barbarian Europe; and the Vikings. Emphasis will be on cultural and social transformations, and archaeological debates surrounding the construction of narratives about the deep past. This is a lecture class in which I encourage discussion throughout.

ANTH 4590-01  ANTHROPOLOGY OF GIRLHOOD   3.0   FRASER
MW 3:30-4:20 PM

From within the familiar boundaries of one’s society, it may seem relatively straightforward about what it is to be a girl especially as a biological phase in the life course. But on close reexamination girlhood is never a taken for granted given in any culture, nor for any individual girl. There is much at stake in defining and shaping the experience of girlhood, whether one examines it’s political, social, symbolic, reproductive or economic aspects. This course will examine girlhood from multiple theoretical and descriptive perspective and in cross-cultural contexts. It will draw on first-person accounts as well as academic texts for which there is an increasing number as the topic of girlhood has developed as a field of intellectual inquiry.

ANTH 4590-02   AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL ART   3.0   SKERRITT
M 10:00-12:30 PM

What does it mean to call Aboriginal art “contemporary”? Taking advantage of UVA’s world-class collection of Aboriginal Australian art, this course will introduce students to the key art historical, philosophical and anthropological approaches to Aboriginal art. The seminar will situate Aboriginal art within a global critical context, asking students to consider the specific challenges that the Aboriginal art movement poses to our understanding of contemporary art and culture. Students will have the opportunity to test these ideas through direct engagement with the collections of the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at UVA.

 

ANTH 4591-01    POLITICAL-PUBLIC ANTHORPOLOGY   3.0    KHARE
R 3:30-6:00 PM 

The seminar will pursue aspects in and uses of Political and Public Anthropology for studying comparative moral, political and social inequalities extant, for example, in the US, India and now other societies more globally.  We will discuss anthropological uses—and limits—of moral-cultural relativism, for example, in handling (a) selected race-caste-class-ethnic disparities within both traditional hierarchical and modern social stratification systems; (b) youth identity and activism for social justice in democracies; (c) women’s reproductive rights and surrogacy issues as in a market place; and (d) topics and issues in public anthropology.

The students will pursue the preceding by conducting their student-led specific topic or issue oriented discussion sessions, colloquiums, and short writing projects. These efforts would result into writing of the Senior Seminar research paper.

ANTH 4591-02     ANTHROPOLOGY IN VIRGINIA    3.0    HANTMAN
MW 2:00-3:15 PM 

Course Description: This class is an Anthropology fourth year major seminar.  It is intended to be a capstone course for your studies in Anthropology.  As with all senior seminars this course is organized around a theme or themes and in this course you will be bringing your global knowledge of anthropology to bear on issues in ‘our’ own backyard.  Particular focus will be on issues relating to colonialism, race, and class in Virginia.  We will read and discuss works of historical anthropology and archaeology to bring new perspectives to Virginia’s multifaceted and complicated cultural history from ca. 1600 to the present.  

ANTH 4841   QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS II    3.0    NEIMAN
T 3:30-6:00 PM

This is a second course in statistical methods useful in many disciplines, including archaeology, anthropology, and environmental sciences. The goal is to equip students with statistical skills useful in analyzing empirical variation, deciphering links to the environmental and historical contexts in which that variation occurs, and using the results to advance scientific understanding. Coverage includes probability distributions, basics of maximum-likelihood and Bayesian estimation, linear and generalized-linear models, non-parametric smoothing, multivariate distances, Mantel regression, and ordination methods (principle components, correspondence analysis, and multidimensional scaling). The course emphasizes practical data analysis using SAS and R. Prerequisite: an introductory course in statistical data analysis.

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Major Area Requirements

 

ANTH 5210   RECONFIGUIRING KINSHIP STUDIES     3.0    TBA
T 2:00-4:30 PM

TBA

ANTH 5360     WORLD MENTAL HEALTH     3.0     MERKEL
W 6:30-9:00 PM

This course will examine mental health issues from the perspectives of biomedicine and anthropology, emphasizing local traditions of illness and healing as well as evidence from epidemiology and neurobiology. Included topics will be psychosis, depression, PTSD, Culture Bound Syndromes, and suicide. We will also examine the role of pharmaceutical companies in the spread of western based mental health care and culturally sensitive treatment.

ANTH 5401   LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS   3.0   CONTINI-MORAVA
M 5:00-7:30 PM

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include one paper on phonology, one on morphology, and one on syntax (the nature of the assignment may vary depending on the particular language being studied).

ANTH 5410  PHONOLOGY   3.0   DOBRIN
T 4:30-7:00 PM

Phonology is concerned with the way speech sounds are organized as systems. Which sounds occur in a given language? What are the rules for their combination? How are they realized in different positions of a word or phrase? In order to answer these kinds of questions, we look not only at the patterning of segments, but also at the way that patterning is explained in terms of more basic properties, features. We look at higher level prosodic structures like syllables that group sounds into larger units. We also study aspects of the speech signal that are in principle independent of the segment, like stress, tone, and rhythm. In this course students gain experience analyzing phonological systems in a theoretically informed way. They learn to appreciate what kinds of problems the field of phonology aims to account for, to argue for solutions to such problems, and to understand the significance of their analyses in terms of the broader concerns of phonological theory. Coursework involves reading, class discussion, and solving homework problems. Prerequisite: LNGS 3250 or permission of instructor.

ANTH 5541  TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS    3.0    LEFKOWITZ
M 2:00-4:30 PM

Nouns as a grammatical category are often described as a linguistic universal, but what does it mean to claim this?   Of course it is possible to name things and to describe who is doing what in any language, but is that the same thing as having “noun” as a grammatical category?  This seminar will explore the criteria for answering this question, and for languages that appear to have the category “noun”, we will also look at other categories often associated with nouns, like number, gender/noun class, case, determiners, and relative clauses, and at the grammatical phenomenon of nominalization.  Each student will choose a particular language to focus on for the course, reporting on that language for a series of assignments. Prerequisite:  a course in linguistics.  This course will count toward the Theory requirement for the linguistics major and MA program.

ANTH 5559-01     LANGUAGE CONTACT    3.0   SICOLI
W 2:00-4:30 PM 

Considers how languages change when part of social systems and affected by historical processes. We will contrast language change through internal processes of drift and regular sound change with contact-induced language change involving multilingualism and code switching, language shift and lexical borrowing, the emergence of pidgin, creole, and intertwined languages, language endangerment, and computational tools for historical linguistics.

ANTH 5559-02     AFFECT EMOTION EMBODIMENT   3.0    SCHERZ
T 2:00-4:30 PM

TBA

ANTH 5590   CARE AND ABANDONMENT    3.0   SCHERZ
T 2:00-4:30 PM 

This is an advanced seminar in medical anthropology.  In it we will explore the norms, practices, and forms of reasoning which shape processes of care and abandonment across a range of contemporary cases.  We will begin with Michel Foucault’s writings on bio-power, or how “making live” and “letting die” became central to liberal forms of governance.  Then will consider how the theorization of caregiving in anthropology elates to questions of morality, kinship, personhood, and medicine.  Finally, will explore how a focus on abandonment and abjection has altered the field of anthropology in recent decades. 

 

ANTH 5870  ARCHAEOZOOLOGY   3.0   WATTENMAKER
W 3:00-4:30 PM

This laboratory course provides students with the background and skills needed to analyze animal bones from archaeological sites. Emphasis will be placed on the potential of faunal analysis for contributing to anthropological issues, such as the domestication of animals, political economy, the origins of the state, and the organization of urban economies. Class sessions will include lectures and laboratory work. Lectures will include a critical survey of the methodological approaches and techniques used to address anthropological questions through the analysis of faunal remains. Topics such as research design, strategies of field collection of faunal remains, and data analysis and interpretation will be covered. In the laboratory, students will learn to identify faunal remains to species, to determine age and sex of species, to distinguish between wild and domestic animals, to recognize bone pathologies, and to observe cultural modification of bones, such as butchering marks. The course requirements include a series of short papers based on laboratory analysis of archaeological faunal remains, and a final paper. The final paper will involve the analysis of a small archaeological collection of faunal remains from the ancient city of Kazane (Turkey), focusing on a particular time period (e.g. prehistoric, early historic) and part of the site (e.g. house, palace). Each student will share his or her findings with the rest of the class. We will compare and contrast results, and discuss implications of findings. Cooperation and discussion between students is strongly encouraged.

ANTH 5885  ARCHAEOLOGY OF COLONIAL EXPANSIONS  3.0  LAVIOLETTE
R 5:00-7:30 PM

This seminar explores the comparative archaeology of colonialism in its changing theoretical landscape, examining the structural similarities and differences between European colonialism and many other archaeologically known examples, as well as the task of representing the human experience of being colonized.  When we think about colonialism we typically focus on Western European expansions from the 15th century onwards, especially in the context of competitive mercantile economies that fueled the power of the colonizers, and we will certainly study them here.  But archaeological and historical examples go well beyond these contexts; they are available, for example, in ancient Mesopotamia, the Andes, in Iron Age sub-Saharan Africa, and of course in the Classical Mediterranean.  My goal is to expose you to multiple theoretical paradigms that archaeologists have developed to understand colonial expansions, and a wide range of case studies employing these paradigms that illustrate the broad commonalities underlying the colonial process—including the exercise of power and responses to it—without losing the historical/archaeological particulars or the human experience.   

 

 

 

 


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Course Number Index

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:


Prin. of Social Analysis Archaeology Linguistics

1050,2270,2280,2325,2360,2365,2375,2625,3130,3240,3340,
3370,3395,3559,3630,4590-01,4591-02,5210,5590

2820,3589,3885,5870,5589

2430,2559,3455,3470,3490,
5401,5410,5541,5559

Major Requirements
1010, 3020, 4591-01, 4591-02

Beyond the West
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern requirement)

2360,2365,2375,2430,2559,2625,3340,3630,2820,3240,2430,3455,3470,4590

Senior Seminars

4591-01, 4591-02


       


Graduate Courses


5210

RECONFIGUIRING KINSHIP STUDIES 

5360

WORLD MENTAL HEALTH 

5401
LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS 
5410
PHONOLOGY 
5541
TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS 
5559-01
LANGUAGE CONTACT 
5559-02
AFFECT EMOTION EMBODIMENT 
5590
CARE AND ABANDONMENT 
5870
ARCHAEOZOOLOGY 
5885
ARCHAEOLOGY OF COLONIAL EXPANSIONS 
7020
HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY II
7050
ETHNOGRAPHIC WRITING AND REPRESENTATION 
7130
DISEASE, EPIDEMICS AND SOCIETY 
7370
Power and the Body
7455
AFRICAN LANGUAGES 
7470
LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST 
7589-01
ARCHAEOLOGY OF EUROPE 
7589-02
REC RESEARCH PUEBLO PREHISTORY 
7630
CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION 

Full Course Descriptions:

ANTH 5210   RECONFIGUIRING KINSHIP STUDIES     3.0    TBA
T 2:00-4:30 PM

 

ANTH 5360     WORLD MENTAL HEALTH     3.0     MERKEL
W 6:30-9:00 PM

This course will examine mental health issues from the perspectives of biomedicine and anthropology, emphasizing local traditions of illness and healing as well as evidence from epidemiology and neurobiology. Included topics will be psychosis, depression, PTSD, Culture Bound Syndromes, and suicide. We will also examine the role of pharmaceutical companies in the spread of western based mental health care and culturally sensitive treatment.

ANTH 5401   LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS   3.0   CONTINI-MORAVA
M 5:00-7:30 PM

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include one paper on phonology, one on morphology, and one on syntax (the nature of the assignment may vary depending on the particular language being studied).

ANTH 5410  PHONOLOGY   3.0   DOBRIN
T 4:30-7:00 PM

Phonology is concerned with the way speech sounds are organized as systems. Which sounds occur in a given language? What are the rules for their combination? How are they realized in different positions of a word or phrase? In order to answer these kinds of questions, we look not only at the patterning of segments, but also at the way that patterning is explained in terms of more basic properties, features. We look at higher level prosodic structures like syllables that group sounds into larger units. We also study aspects of the speech signal that are in principle independent of the segment, like stress, tone, and rhythm. In this course students gain experience analyzing phonological systems in a theoretically informed way. They learn to appreciate what kinds of problems the field of phonology aims to account for, to argue for solutions to such problems, and to understand the significance of their analyses in terms of the broader concerns of phonological theory. Coursework involves reading, class discussion, and solving homework problems. Prerequisite: LNGS 3250 or permission of instructor.

ANTH 5541  TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS    3.0    LEFKOWITZ
M 2:00-4:30 PM

Nouns as a grammatical category are often described as a linguistic universal, but what does it mean to claim this?   Of course it is possible to name things and to describe who is doing what in any language, but is that the same thing as having “noun” as a grammatical category?  This seminar will explore the criteria for answering this question, and for languages that appear to have the category “noun”, we will also look at other categories often associated with nouns, like number, gender/noun class, case, determiners, and relative clauses, and at the grammatical phenomenon of nominalization.  Each student will choose a particular language to focus on for the course, reporting on that language for a series of assignments. Prerequisite:  a course in linguistics.  This course will count toward the Theory requirement for the linguistics major and MA program.

ANTH 5559-01     LANGUAGE CONTACT    3.0   SICOLI
W 2:00-4:30 PM 

Considers how languages change when part of social systems and affected by historical processes. We will contrast language change through internal processes of drift and regular sound change with contact-induced language change involving multilingualism and code switching, language shift and lexical borrowing, the emergence of pidgin, creole, and intertwined languages, language endangerment, and computational tools for historical linguistics.

ANTH 5559-02     AFFECT EMOTION EMBODIMENT   3.0    SCHERZ
T 2:00-4:30 PM

TBA

ANTH 5590   CARE AND ABANDONMENT    3.0   SCHERZ
T 2:00-4:30 PM 

This is an advanced seminar in medical anthropology.  In it we will explore the norms, practices, and forms of reasoning which shape processes of care and abandonment across a range of contemporary cases.  We will begin with Michel Foucault’s writings on bio-power, or how “making live” and “letting die” became central to liberal forms of governance.  Then will consider how the theorization of caregiving in anthropology elates to questions of morality, kinship, personhood, and medicine.  Finally, will explore how a focus on abandonment and abjection has altered the field of anthropology in recent decades. 

 

ANTH 5870  ARCHAEOZOOLOGY   3.0   WATTENMAKER
W 3:00-4:30 PM

This laboratory course provides students with the background and skills needed to analyze animal bones from archaeological sites. Emphasis will be placed on the potential of faunal analysis for contributing to anthropological issues, such as the domestication of animals, political economy, the origins of the state, and the organization of urban economies. Class sessions will include lectures and laboratory work. Lectures will include a critical survey of the methodological approaches and techniques used to address anthropological questions through the analysis of faunal remains. Topics such as research design, strategies of field collection of faunal remains, and data analysis and interpretation will be covered. In the laboratory, students will learn to identify faunal remains to species, to determine age and sex of species, to distinguish between wild and domestic animals, to recognize bone pathologies, and to observe cultural modification of bones, such as butchering marks. The course requirements include a series of short papers based on laboratory analysis of archaeological faunal remains, and a final paper. The final paper will involve the analysis of a small archaeological collection of faunal remains from the ancient city of Kazane (Turkey), focusing on a particular time period (e.g. prehistoric, early historic) and part of the site (e.g. house, palace). Each student will share his or her findings with the rest of the class. We will compare and contrast results, and discuss implications of findings. Cooperation and discussion between students is strongly encouraged.

ANTH 5885  ARCHAEOLOGY OF COLONIAL EXPANSIONS  3.0  LAVIOLETTE
R 5:00-7:30 PM

This seminar explores the comparative archaeology of colonialism in its changing theoretical landscape, examining the structural similarities and differences between European colonialism and many other archaeologically known examples, as well as the task of representing the human experience of being colonized.  When we think about colonialism we typically focus on Western European expansions from the 15th century onwards, especially in the context of competitive mercantile economies that fueled the power of the colonizers, and we will certainly study them here.  But archaeological and historical examples go well beyond these contexts; they are available, for example, in ancient Mesopotamia, the Andes, in Iron Age sub-Saharan Africa, and of course in the Classical Mediterranean.  My goal is to expose you to multiple theoretical paradigms that archaeologists have developed to understand colonial expansions, and a wide range of case studies employing these paradigms that illustrate the broad commonalities underlying the colonial process—including the exercise of power and responses to it—without losing the historical/archaeological particulars or the human experience.   

 

ANTH 7020      HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY II   3.0   DAMON
W 5:00-7:30 PM

Analyzes the main schools of anthropological thought since World War II, a half century during which separate English, French, and American traditions have influenced each other to produce a broad and subtle international discipline.

ANTH 7050    ETHNOGRAPHIC WRITING AND REPRESENTATION  3.0   BASHKOW
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

Seminar on the craft of ethnographic writing and the ethical, political, and practical challenges of describing studied people in scholarly books and articles. What can student researchers do during fieldwork to help them write better dissertations more easily? How should they analyze and present field data? Prerequisite: ANTH 7040 or instructor permission. Suitable for pre- and post-field graduate students.

ANTH 7130   DISEASE, EPIDEMICS AND SOCIETY   3.0   SHEPHERD
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

Topics covered in this course will include emerging diseases and leading killers in the twenty-first century, disease ecology, disease history and mortality transitions, the sociology of epidemics, the role of epidemiology in the mobilization of public health resources to confront epidemics, and the social processes by which the groups become stigmatized during disease outbreaks. This is a course that seeks to present a holistic view of global health by drawing on work crossing several disciplines, including anthropological demography, epidemiology, public health, disease history, genomic studies of disease pathogens, and medical anthropology.

ANTH 7370    POWER AND THE BODY    3.0    MENTORE
MW 11:00-11:50 AM 

"This course is designed for those students interested in how and why anthropology arrives at its own peculiar paradigms of identity about the Other from its own deeply embedded western cultural understandings of body and Self."

ANTH 7455  AFRICAN LANUAGES   3.0   CONTINI-MORAVA 
TR 11:00-12:15 PM 

This course is an introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. For about three-fourths of the course we will discuss linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax) among a wide variety of languages; the classification of African languages; and the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory. For the last fourth of the course we will address a range of sociolinguistic topics, including language and social identity, the politics of language planning and policy, language contact and its effects, including multilingualism, language death/endangerment, and the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth. While lectures address general and comparative topics, each student will choose one language to focus on, using published materials available in the library. This language will be the basis for the major assignments. Some prior experience with linguistics is desirable (such as LNGS 3250/7010, ANTH 2400 or ANTH 7400), but the course will also be accessible to highly motivated students who have not taken a previous linguistics course.  For these students, supplementary readings on basic linguistics are included in the syllabus. 

ANTH 7470  LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST    3.0    LEFKOWITZ
TR 12:30-1:20 PM

TBA

ANTH 7589-01   ARCHAEOLOGY OF EUROPE    3.0    LAVIOLETTE
TR 9:30-10:45 AM

This course surveys topics in the archaeology of Europe that cross-cut time periods, regions, and major transformations. We begin with the peopling of Europe and the ‘Neanderthal debate’; then move through interpretations of cave art and other early modern cultural achievements; emergence of settled village life and food production; megalithic monuments and motivations and technologies for building them; development of metal technology and the impact of metals on society; emergence of Bronze Age societies and urban centers; societies of Iron Age Europe; Roman relations with Barbarian Europe; and the Vikings. Emphasis will be on cultural and social transformations, and archaeological debates surrounding the construction of narratives about the deep past. This is a lecture class in which I encourage discussion throughout.

ANTH 7589-02   CURRENT ISSUES IN PUEBLO ARCHAEOLOGY    3.0   PLOG
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

The seminar will focus on recent literature on the Pueblo region of the American Southwest and will address a wide range of topics including agriculture, migration, population dynamics, social organization, trade and exchange, Southwest relations with Mesoamerica, and religion and cosmology.  Each week we will read and discuss a set of readings on such topics emphasizing the most recent literature and debates.  Geographical areas to be emphasized will be the Mesa Verde region, the Rio Grande Valley, Chaco Canyon, the Hopi area, and the Zuni region.

ANTH 7630   CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION   3.0   SHEPHERD
MW 3:30-4:45 PM

Prerequisite: Anthro 101 or equivalent social science or China-related course.  This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Heavy emphasis is on the ethnography from Taiwan where traditional forms have endured and been studied intensively. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of traditional Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety.  The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered.  Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in twentieth century Chinese life.

ANTHROPOLOGY CREDIT COURSES:

STS 2500-008   LABORATORY LIFE: SOCIAL RSEARCH METHODS FOR STUDYING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING   3.0  
MW 5:00-6:15 PM 

This course investigates how people, machines, politics, and expertise come together to produce new data, knowledge, and designs in research laboratories. Students will learn key ideas from the fields of sociology of knowledge, philosophy of science, and science and technology studies. You will also learn to design and carry out qualitative social research, using methods such as interviews, observation, and document analysis. On several field trips to laboratories, you will watch research in action and talk to researchers about their work. Students will collect and analyze their own data to study how science and engineering research really happens.