1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Fall 2012

 


       


Undergraduate Courses
(meet major area requirements)


See Major Area Requirements

1010
INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY
3155
ANTHROPOLOGY OF EVERYDAY AMERICAN LIFE
1401
YOUR HERITAGE OF LANGUAGE
3320
SHAMANISM, HEALING AND RITUAL
2310
SYMBOL & RITUAL
3480
LANGUAGE & PREHISTORY
2320
ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION
3541
DISCOURSES OF THE ARAB SPRING
2400
LANGUAGE & CULTURE
3630
CHINESE FAMILY & RELIGION
2420
LANGUAGE & GENDER
3700
GLOBALIZING INDIA
2291
GLOBAL CULTURE AND PUBLIC HEALTH
3830
NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY
2500-01
MUSLIMS AS MAJORITIES & MINORITIES
3850
HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY
2500-02
EUROPEAN INTEGRATION
4591-001
DISEASE, EPIDEMICS & SOCIETY
2589
ARCHAEOLOGY OF RITUAL
4591-002
ANIMALS: GOOD TO THINK
2800
INTRO. TO ARCHAEOLOGY
4591-003
ARCHAEOLOGY OF COLONIALISM
2810
HUMAN ORIGINS
5420
THEORIES OF LANGUAGE
3010
THEORY & HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY
5490
SPEECH PLAY & VERBAL ART
3152
AMAZONIAN PEOPLES
 
 

Full Course Descriptions:

ANTH 1010     INTRO. TO ANTHROPOLOGY     3.0     ALEXY
TR 8:00-8:50 AM

This course is an overview of key themes and theory in cultural anthropology. It is meant to provide students with the analytical and methodological tools to critically consider cultural difference, social organization, and social change. Themes include: anthropological methods, kinship, gender, religion, colonization, media, pop cultures, consumption, medicine, media, globalization, and post-modernity.

ANTH 1401    YOUR HERITAGE LANGUAGE    3.0    DOBRIN
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

This course introduces students to structural linguistics, social approaches to the study of language, and language policy through a focus on the traditional languages or heritage languages spoken more or less actively within students' own families and home communities, either at present or in recent generations. While heritage languages may continue to be transmitted, they often do so in a partial and socially muted way that leads to their eventual loss: they may be used only privately in the home, or with a reduced expressive range and set of functions, or exclusively in an oral medium. The lack of visibility and public acceptance of the many heritage languages that surround us submerges the full range of linguistic practices we engage in beneath a powerful monolingual norm. So in this course students learn to draw upon linguistic diversity as a positive resource in developing their own identities and interacting with others in our multicultural society. Limited to 1st and 2nd year students.

ANTH 1559     CONCEPT OF CULTURE     3.0      BASHKOW
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

Culture is the central concept that anthropologists use to understand the striking differences among human societies and how people organize the meaningful parts of their lives. In this course we explore this diversity and examine its implications for concepts of human nature, knowledge and creativity, identity, economy, and power. We consider how learning about other cultures can contribute to our understanding of ourselves.

ANTH 2190     DESIRE AND WORLD ECONOMICS     3.0     MENTORE
MW 11:00-11:50 AM

This course offers an insight into the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services practiced by people’s ignored or unknown to classic Western economics. Its principle focus will open upon the obvious differences between cultural concepts of the self and the very notion of its desire. Such arguments as those which theorize on the "rationality" of the market and the "naturalness" of competition will be debunked.

ANTH 2230     FANTASY AND SOCIAL VALUES     3.0     WAGNER
TR 9:30-10:45 AM

An examination of imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Attention is given to "alternate cultures" and fictional societal models. A "cultural imaginary" allow us to think carefully about implications of gender, technology, and social existence that we, for very good reasons, are not allowed to experiment upon. Three papers, mandatory attendance in lecture.

ANTH 2280     MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY     3.0     DOBERNE
MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

The suffering body is inevitable in human experience, but the meaning of suffering is interpreted differently across cultures and time. Conceptions of the body, notions of health and methods of healing vary considerably. The point of this course, which introduces medical anthropology to undergraduates, is to contextualize bodies, suffering, health and power. The aim of the course is to provide a broad understanding of the relationship between culture (particularly in the U.S.), healing (especially the Western form of healing known as biomedicine), health and political power.

ANTH 2291     GLOBAL CULTURE AND PUBLIC HEALTH    3.0   COLVIN
TR 9:30-10:45 AM

 

ANTH 2310     SYMBOL AND RITUAL     3.0     DOUGLASS
TR 3:30-4:45 PM

This course will introduce the student to the social meaning of rituals and symbols.  We will look at symbols not only in rituals but also those embedded in “everyday life.”  Likewise, we will study rituals not only as recognized ceremonies but also as accepted parts of our normal routines.

ANTH 2320     ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION     3.0     STAFF
MW 11:00-11:50 AM

Ritual provides the characteristic approach of anthropology to the comparative study of religion, and the analysis of ritual is anthropology's major contribution to that project. Everywhere ritual permeates social life, yet in no other category of behavior is the exoticness of other cultures more in evidence. This course asks commonsense questions about religion and ritual, and shows how far we have come towards answering them in a century of theorizing. There are no prerequisites for this course, which is designed to be accessible to those with no background in anthropology.

ANTH 2400     LANGUAGE AND CULTURE     3.0     WAIRUNGU
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Course includes a plus obligatory discussion section. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

ANTH 2420     LANGUAGE AND GENDER     3.0     CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 11:00-11:50 AM

In many societies, differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation. We will compare gender differences in our own society with those in other societies including non-Western ones. Topics to be addressed include: the relation between gender difference and gender inequality (in scholarly discussion of language as well as in language itself); intersection of gender, race, and social class in language use; gender and non-verbal communication (including representations of gender in advertising and the media); issues of nature vs. nurture in explaining these differences. Requirements will include one or two papers based on fieldwork conducted jointly with a working group, participation in the required discussion section, and a take-home essay question exam focusing on the course readings and lectures.

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Major Area Requirements

 

ANTH 2500-01    MUSLIMS AS MAJORITIES AND MINORITIES    3.0    KHAN
MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

Muslims constitute approximately one fourth of the world’s population and roughly 30-35 percent of all Muslims live in the region of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal). Immensely diverse in terms of history, language, culture and religion, Muslims of this region evade all simple classification and generalization. Yet, this is precisely what postcolonial nation-states attempt to do in order to manage their populations, organizing citizens into “majority” and “minority” groups. In some cases, this organizing has placed Muslims who imagine themselves to be quite similar into mutually opposed categories; at other times it enforces an intimacy between people that might not otherwise exist. Everywhere such organizing has had a profound impact on how Muslims understand themselves and their community. This class explores how new forms of community and social life emerge as Muslims negotiate their status as “majorities” and “minorities” in the postcolonial nation-states of South Asia.

ANTH 2500-02    EUROPEAN INTEGRATION    3.0    GRAAN  
TR 5:00-6:15 PM

 

ANTH 2589   ARCHAEOLOGY OF RITUAL    3.0    HOLEMAN
  MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

This course will explore the various and complicated ways in which ritual was an integral component of prehistoric power structures.  This course will cover the different expressions of ritual found in the archaeological record, from small offerings in residential houses, to monumental public architecture.  We will survey the different ways ritual has been approached archaeologically in both interpretations and methodology.  This course will use examples from around the globe.

ANTH 2800    INTRO. TO ARCHAEOLOGY    3.0    LAVIOLETTE
MW 10:00-10:50 AM

This course introduces the history and goals of archaeological research, different theoretical approaches to the study of ancient societies and culture change, and archaeological methods. Alongside this study of archaeological method and theory, we will explore major transformations in human history through archaeological case studies and discoveries from important sites worldwide. The class meets as a lecture on Monday and Wednesday and students take an additional mandatory discussion section.

ANTH 2810    HUMAN ORIGINS    3.0    HANTMAN
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

The course provides an overview and assessment of the theory, methods, and data used by anthropologists to reconstruct human physical and cultural evolution. Chronologically, the course spans the time from the initial appearance of distinctly human ancestors (ca 4.5 million years ago) to the period just prior to the rise of plant and animal domestication and early village life (ca 10,000 B.C.). The course is divided into three topical components: 1) a review of evolutionary theory, and the ever-growing American controversy surrounding that theory; 2) an in-depth survey of the data used to support current models of the complex ancestral tree of human evolution, and 3) a study of the origins of uniquely modern human behaviors of the relatively recent past, such as complex language, ritual, religion and art, as well as the question over how, when and where 'modern' humans evolved. Throughout we will examine anthropological perspectives in evolutionary studies as they compare and /or contrast with interpretations of unique (innate?) human behaviors argued for in the literature of evolutionary psychology and biology, as well as how those arguments are represented in the popular media and in public policy debates. The grade for the course is based on two quizzes (40% total) and a mid-term and final exam (60% total).

ANTH 3010    THEORY & HISTORY ANTHROPOLOGY    3.0    ALEXY
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

This course is designed for students who are majoring in anthropology. It presents a broad historical outline of major theoretical approaches in the field, from the late 19th century to the present. These approaches will be examined in relation to both evolving debates within the discipline, and the larger historical, cultural and intellectual contexts in which they were produced, and which they to some degree reflect; we will also discuss the enduring relevance of these theories. The course stresses close reading of primary texts and emphasizes in particular the critical analysis of these texts' arguments. The discussion section is obligatory. This is a required course for anthropology majors.

ANTH 3152    AMAZONIAN PEOPLES    3.0    MENTORE
MW 3:30-4:45 PM

Native Lowland South American people have been portrayed as "animistic", "totemic", "shamanic", "mythologic", "Dreauduan", "slash and burn horticulturalists", "stateless", "gentle", "fierce", and much more. What do these anthropological portraits mean and what do they contribute to the collective body of Western intellectual thought? Is there any relation between such thinking and the experience of being "Indian" in Amazonian societies? Are there any other ways of understanding the Amazonian social experiences? This course addresses these questions through a reading of the ethnography of the region. This course will satisfy the non-western perspectives requirement.

ANTH 3155    ANTHROPOLOGY OF EVERYDAY AMERICAN LIFE    3.0    DAMON
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

Taking a production and exchange orientation to society, this course uses anthropological models to analyze aspects of the US experience in North America and its extension into the world. The models will be drawn primarily from the anthropological analysis of exchange, rites of transition, sacrifice and mythology. Although introduced by issues drawn from the immediate questions of American culture, the course has a serious historical orientation. It runs from our 18th century foundation up to contemporary crises.  Students will write several response papers (2-4 pages/) and one longer paper (10+/_ pages) moving towards a synthesis of the course or a research proposal built out of the response papers but involving modest additional library or ethnographic research. Monday and Wednesdays are lecture days, Fridays devoted to Damon-led discussion. There will be no tests but occasional quizzes. The course should satisfy Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 3320    SHAMANISM, HEALING AND RITUAL    3.0    TURNER
R 7:00-9:30 PM

The course delves into the sources of shamanism and ritual healing. It provides understanding of their different logic, and therefore why they communicate and heal. The class brings to life the reports and experiences of contemporary non-Western shamanic and healing rituals, maintaining respect for native interpretations in order to understand the effectiveness of their rituals. We will emphasize the human, personal experience of the events as living processes, and will use the in-depth studies of scholars who have become more than academics and who sometimes participate as practitioners of the crafts about which they seek knowledge. The experiencing and practicing of shamanism and healing being the actual life of these crafts, we will learn how to approximate a sense of these rituals by enacting them. A term paper is required, also a book presentation and short papers during the term.

ANTH 3340    ECOLOGY AND SOCIETY    3.0    DAMON
MW 7:30-8:45 PM

This course attempts to 1) mediate the divide between the Arts and the Sciences; 2) introduce students new to anthropology aspects of culture theory and contemporary ecological/environmental anthropology; 3) forge a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology; 4) provide new insights on how human both fashion and are fashioned by their environments; 5) create a seminar-like context in which we can evaluate, as anthropologists and citizens of our world, aspects of the current environmental debate in our culture; and 6) facilitate independent study on environmental issues by each student. Although case studies will be drawn from throughout the world, there will be a stress on the social systems and environments triangulating South Asia, East Asia, and Australia, and the Americas. A dominant theme will be the relationships between climate and human culture. The course will be taught in two parts. Lectures based on readings will occupy every Monday and for 25 minutes on Wednesdays; the last part of every Wednesday will be devoted to class discussion of special readings through March, and then individual research projects in April.  An additional one hour discussion section is required part of this course. The course meets the Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 3480    LANGUAGE AND PREHISTORY    3.0    DANZIGER
T 2:00-3:15 PM

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics - the study of how languages change over time - and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the comparative-historical requirement for Linguistics majors.

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Major Area Requirements

 

ANTH 3541    DISCOURSES OF THE ARAB SPRING    3.0    LEFKOWITZ
MW 10:00-10:50 AM

 

ANTH 3590    LOVE AND ROMANTIC INTIMACIES    3.0    ALEXY
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

This course offers an introduction to recent anthropological scholarship on romance to examine how intimate relationships shape human experiences.  Drawing from ethnographies of diverse cultural contexts, we will consider changing perceptions of what makes relationships successful, and changing expectations about the role of romantic love in marriage.  Through readings and films, we will investigate the increasingly popular idealization of "companionate marriages," in which spouses are ideally linked by affection, and the subjectivities promoted by these ideals.  Our ethnographic examples include queer and straight experiences, and a diversity of racial, cultural, classed, and gendered representations.

ANTH 3630    CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION    3.0    SHEPHERD
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional Chinese forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety. The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered. Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in 20th- and 21st-centuryChinese life.

This course will satisfy the Second Writing Requirement. Meets College's Non-Western Perspective Requirements.

ANTH 3700    GLOBALIZING INDIA    3.0    KHARE
T 3:30-6:00 PM

The course explores how India is changing as it joins major globalizing forces for family and caste/class adjustments, competitive markets, contested political representations, and a vociferous mass-media society. The three crucial social areas explored would include: the upper- middle and lower caste-class family-self-community "privileging social niches"; the proliferating "representations of bazaar culture" for securing material goods and preferential social and even religious treatments; and an "elbowing" political and media culture. 

ANTH 3830    NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY    3.0    HANTMAN
TR 3:30-4:45 PM

This course provides an overview of the contributions of archaeological research to our understanding of the long-term history of North America, particularly the history of indigenous Native American people. Following an introductory study of the diverse history of archaeological research in North American from the 18th century to the present, the course shifts focus to specific topics of interest. Among these are the debate over the timing and process of the initial peopling of the Americas, the development of distinctive regional traditions, discussions of the origins of domestication and regional exchange systems and the rise and fall of chiefdoms in prehistory, colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans, and the historical archaeology of Europeans and Africans in Colonial America.

ANTH 3850    HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY    3.0    NEIMAN
W 4:30-7:00 PM

Historical archaeology is the archaeological study of the continental and transoceanic human migrations that began in the fifteenth century, their effects on native peoples, and the historical trajectories of the societies that they created. This course offers an introduction to the field. It emphasizes how theoretical models, analytical methods, and archaeological data can be combined to make and evaluate credible inferences about the cultural dynamics of the past. The class combines lecture and discussion with computer workshops, in which students have a chance to explore historical issues raised in the reading and lectures. Our principle historical focus this semester is change in the conflicting economic and social strategies pursued by Europeans, Africans, and Native-Americans, and their descendants in the 17th-century and 18th-century Chesapeake. The course is designed to teach students in architectural history, history, and archaeology how to use theoretical models, simple statistical methods, and software applications, including spreadsheets, databases, and GIS, to address important historical questions.

ANTH 4591-001    DISEASE, EPIDEMICS & SOCIETY    3.0    SHEPHERD
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

Topics to be discussed will include: disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, societal reactions to epidemic outbreaks, the differential impact of mortality by gender, age, and class, the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine.  Case histories of specific epidemics will likely include studies of influenza, cholera, smallpox, malaria, HIV, tuberculosis, plague.

ANTH 4591-002    ANIMALS: GOOD TO THINK    3.0    DOUGLASS
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

Animals: Good to Think will be a seminar on the anthropology of human cultural relations with animals. It is inspired in part by the recent research and theory in animal studies.  The seminar will emphasize only a few of many possible themes, such as animals as symbol, animals as spectacle and sport, animals as domesticates, “pets” and food, and animals as scientific object.  We will especially emphasize horses.

ANTH 4591-003    ARCHAEOLOGY OF COLONIALISM    3.0    LAVIOLETTE
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

This seminar explores the comparative archaeology of colonialism, emphasizing European expansions post AD 1500 but contextualizing them against a backdrop of other archaeologically known examples, e.g., in the ancient Near East, the Classical Mediterranean world, and cases of internal colonialism. In addition to the archaeology itself, we will be considering the success of various perspectives in terms of translating and communicating the human experience of being colonized. The core of the class will be critical readings of case studies and attention to the changing theoretical landscape of colonialism studies. This course can fulfill the Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 5200     HISTORY OF KINSHIP STUDIES     3.0     MCKINNON
T 3:30-6:00 PM

This course explores the development of kinship studies in anthropology from 19th century evolutionary theorists through the classic kinship studies of the 20th century, ­including British descent theory, French alliance theory, and American cultural theory—to more recent developments relating to “house societies” and “cultures of relatedness.” The course is a critical appreciation of a body of literature that has been central to the development of anthropological theory for the last 150 years. It seeks to understand how these “scientific” theories were culturally constituted, what the analytic consequences were of their particular cultural and historical configurations, and what their relation was to discourses of social hierarchy that articulated what would count as "modern" or "backward."

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Major Area Requirements

 

ANTH 5420     THEORIES OF LANGUAGE     3.0     CONTINI-MORAVA
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; weekly reading responses, a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course.

ANTH 5490     SPEECH PLAY AND VERBAL ART     3.0     LEFKOWITZ
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

 

ANTH 5590-001     CULTURAL IDEOLOGY AND IDENTITIES     3.0     KHARE
R 3:30-6:00

An exploration of how different cultural reasoning strategies are today employed favoring distinct ideologies for claiming and justifying distinct self and group identities and their representations. Detailed comparative discussions of the above themes will follow (on both cultural descriptive and theoretical levels) on such topics as social hierarchy, inequality vis-à-vis equality (Louis Dumont); collective solidarity, institutions and identity (Mary Douglas); strategies in marginalized socio-religious and ethnic placements (James Scott); and reasoning and identity issues under violence (Amartya Sen).

ANTH 5590-002     MATHEMATICAL KINSHIP     3.0     WAGNER
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

 

 


Back to courses offered

Course Number Index

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:


Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics
1559, 2190, 2230, 2280, 2310, 2320, 3320, 3340, 3590, 5200, 5590-001, 5590-002

2500-01, 3152, 3155 , 3630, 3700

2800, 2810, 3830, 3850

2400, 2420, 2541, 3480, 3541, 5420, 5490,1401
 

Major Requirements
3010
Non-Western perspectives for the majors
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern requirement)
1010, 2500-01, 3152, 3700, 3152
Senior Seminars
4591-001, 4591-002, 4591-003

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


       


Graduate Courses


5200
HISTORY OF KINSHIP STUDIES
5420
THEORIES OF LANGUAGE
5490
SPEECH PLAY & VERBAL ART
5590-001
CULTURAL IDEOLOGY & IDENTITIES
5590-002
MATHEMATICAL KINSHIP
7010
HISTORY THEORY I
7340
ANTHROPOLOGY & HISTORY
7480
LANGUAGE & PREHISTORY
7541-001
TOPICS IN SOCIOLINGUISTICS
7541-002
DISCOURSE OF THE ARAB SPRING
7590-001
LOVE & ROMANTIC INTIMACIES
7590-002
ECOLOGY & SOCIETY
7630
CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION
7855
HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

 


Full Course Descriptions:

ANTH 5200     HISTORY OF KINSHIP STUDIES     3.0     MCKINNON
T 3:30-6:00 PM

This course explores the development of kinship studies in anthropology from 19th century evolutionary theorists through the classic kinship studies of the 20th century, ­including British descent theory, French alliance theory, and American cultural theory—to more recent developments relating to “house societies” and “cultures of relatedness.” The course is a critical appreciation of a body of literature that has been central to the development of anthropological theory for the last 150 years. It seeks to understand how these “scientific” theories were culturally constituted, what the analytic consequences were of their particular cultural and historical configurations, and what their relation was to discourses of social hierarchy that articulated what would count as "modern" or "backward."

ANTH 5420     THEORIES OF LANGUAGE     3.0     CONTINI-MORAVA
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; weekly reading responses, a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course.

ANTH 5490     SPEECH PLAY & VERBAL ART     3.0     LEFKOWITZ
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

 

ANTH 5590-001     CULTURAL IDEOLOGY & IDENTITIES     3.0     KHARE
R 3:30-6:00

An exploration of how different cultural reasoning strategies are today employed favoring distinct ideologies for claiming and justifying distinct self and group identities and their representations. Detailed comparative discussions of the above themes will follow (on both cultural descriptive and theoretical levels) on such topics as social hierarchy, inequality vis-à-vis equality (Louis Dumont); collective solidarity, institutions and identity (Mary Douglas); strategies in marginalized socio-religious and ethnic placements (James Scott); and reasoning and identity issues under violence (Amartya Sen).

ANTH 5590-002     MATHEMATICAL KINSHIP     3.0     WAGNER
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

 

ANTH 7010     HISTORY THEORY I     3.0     BASHKOW
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

This course is the first half of the graduate core sequence in the History of Anthropological Theory, covering from (roughly) the beginning of cosmic time until the mid-20th century. By careful reading of classic works we will learn about the philosophical roots of the two great streams of western social theory, prefiguring the conflict between social evolutionism and cultural particularism in the 20th century. We will study different national traditions of anthropology, emphasizing the U.S., France, and Britain, and trace the early trajectory of major approaches and debates in the field. We will be concerned to understand anthropological theories not only as frameworks for understanding other cultures, but also as reflections or commentaries upon the culture of those who produced them. The course stresses close reading, analysis, and discussion of primary texts. This is a required course for entering anthropology graduate students.

ANTH 7340     ANTHROPOLOGY & HISTORY     3.0     TBA
R 3:30-6:00 PM

 

ANTH 7480     LANGUAGE AND PREHISTORY     3.0     DANZIGER
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics - the study of how languages change over time - and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment.

ANTH 7541-001     TOPICS IN SOCIOLINGUISTICS     3.0     DANZIGER
W 7:00-9:30 PM

This graduate seminar course exposes students to a variety of recent and forthcoming research in linguistic anthropology, with an emphasis on students’ own professionalization and preparedness to undertake research.  Students will explore such topics as the preparation of a research proposal, ethics in linguistic anthropology research, and publication venues in this field.  Assignments will be tailored to the needs of particular students enrolled in the class, but will include written submissions as well as seminar presentations during the semester.

ANTH 7541-002     DISCOURSE OF THE ARAB SPRING     3.0     LEFKOWITZ
MW 10:00-10:50 AM

 

ANTH 7590-001     LOVE AND ROMANTIC INTIMACIES     3.0     ALEXY
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

This course offers an introduction to recent anthropological scholarship on romance to examine how intimate relationships shape human experiences.  Drawing from ethnographies of diverse cultural contexts, we will consider changing perceptions of what makes relationships successful, and changing expectations about the role of romantic love in marriage.  Through readings and films, we will investigate the increasingly popular idealization of "companionate marriages," in which spouses are ideally linked by affection, and the subjectivities promoted by these ideals.  Our ethnographic examples include queer and straight experiences, and a diversity of racial, cultural, classed, and gendered representations.

ANTH 7590-002     ECOLOGY AND SOCIETY     3.0     DAMON
TR 7:30-8:20 PM

This course attempts to 1) mediate the divide between the Arts and the Sciences; 2) introduce students new to anthropology aspects of culture theory and contemporary ecological/environmental anthropology; 3) forge a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology; 4) provide new insights on how human both fashion and are fashioned by their environments; 5) create a seminar-like context in which we can evaluate, as anthropologists and citizens of our world, aspects of the current environmental debate in our culture; and 6) facilitate independent study on environmental issues by each student. Although case studies will be drawn from throughout the world, there will be a stress on the social systems and environments triangulating South Asia, East Asia, and Australia, and the Americas. A dominant theme will be the relationships between climate and human culture. The course will be taught in two parts. Lectures based on readings will occupy every Monday and for 25 minutes on Wednesdays; the last part of every Wednesday will be devoted to class discussion of special readings through March, and then individual research projects in April.  An additional one hour discussion section is required part of this course. The course meets the Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 7630     CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION     3.0     SHEPHERD
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional Chinese forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety. The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered. Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in 20th- and 21st-centuryChinese life.

ANTH 7855     HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY     3.0     NEIMAN
W 4:30-7:00 PM

Historical archaeology is the archaeological study of the continental and transoceanic human migrations that began in the fifteenth century, their effects on native peoples, and the historical trajectories of the societies that they created. This course offers an introduction to the field. It emphasizes how theoretical models, analytical methods, and archaeological data can be combined to make and evaluate credible inferences about the cultural dynamics of the past. The class combines lecture and discussion with computer workshops, in which students have a chance to explore historical issues raised in the reading and lectures. Our principle historical focus this semester is change in the conflicting economic and social strategies pursued by Europeans, Africans, and Native-Americans, and their descendants in the 17th-century and 18th-century Chesapeake. The course is designed to teach students in architectural history, history, and archaeology how to use theoretical models, simple statistical methods, and software applications, including spreadsheets, databases, and GIS, to address important historical questions.