1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Fall 1999

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Cultural Diversity Archaeology Linguistics
223,225,237,324,330,332,
346,355,534,577
109,109B,260,314,
316,356,363
281,589A,589,589C 109,242,344,347,
540,542,549A
Non-Western perspectives
109,109B,332,344
Senior Seminars 
401A, 401B, 401C

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 101 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3) DEETZ
MWF 9:00-9:50

An integrative survey with attention to the major sub-fields of anthropology: human origins, archaeology, anthropological linguistics, cultural anthropology, and folklore. This is a broad introductory course covering human evolution, the relationship of language to thought, cultural diversity and cultural relativity.

ANTH 109 VIETNAMESE CULTURE (3) ROSS
W 4:00-6:30

This course examines the continuities and discontinuities in recurring themes of "traditional" Vietnamese culture. The class size is limited in order to facilitate class discussion and the sharing of study materials. Students will write several short es says on a variety of topics. The class fulfills the Arts and Sciences multicultural requirement and the second writing requirement.

ANTH 109B NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN (3) V. HYMES
T R 2:00-3:15

Explores the lives of Native American women through reading and discussion of life histories, autobiographies, ethnographics, and articles addressing specific questions of the roles and status of women in Native American societies before and after contact with Europeans.

ANTH 223 FANTASY AND SOCIAL VALUES (3) WAGNER
T R 09:30 - 10:45

An examination of imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Attention is given to "alternate cultures" and fictional societal models. A "cultural imaginary" allows us to think carefully about implications of gender, technology, and social existence that we, for very good reasons, are not allowed to experiment upon. Three papers, mandatory attendance in lecture.

ANTH 225 NATIONALISM, RACISM, MULTICULTURALISM (3) HANDLER
M W F 10:00 - l0:50

Introductory course in which the concepts of culture, multiculturalism, race, racism, and nationalism are critically examined in terms of how they are used and structure social relations in American society and, by comparison, how they are defined in other cultures through out the world.

ANTH 237 CULTURE & HISTORY PHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M W F 1100 - 1150

This course is blocked out into three sections: (1) The nature of photography. What form of communication is it and what is unique about it. How do we "read" photographs and why are they always so ambiguous? What are the motivations for snapshots? (2 ) A . survey of the history of photography from its invention at the beginning of the 19th century to the introduction of the Kodak in the 1880's; beyond that if time permitsSubjects to be covered: the peop le involved with the invention of photography; the early photographic processes; photographs of the places in the world, "views"; photographs of individuals, "likenesses"; photographs of "the other"; photographs in the archives-surveillance and the "crim inal type," "genre photography;" photography as an art in the early years until the first decades of the 20th century. The work of particular photographers will be examined in detail. (3) We will conclude by returning to the general nature of photography this time considering the intrusiveness of the photographic act from the "Kodak fiend" to the paparazzi.

ANTH 242 LANGUAGE AND GENDER (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
M W 11:00-11:50 plus obligatory discussion section

In many societies, differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation. We will compare gender differences in our own society with those in other societies, including non-Western ones. Topics to be addressed include: the relation between gender difference and gender inequality (in scholarly discussion of language as well as in language itself); intersection of gender, race, and social class in language use; gender an d non-verbal communication (including representations of gender in advertising and the media); issues of nature vs. nurture in explaining these differences. Requirements will include one or two papers based on fieldwork conducted jointly with a working g roup, and a take-home essay question exam focusing on the course readings.

ANTH 260 ANTH 260 INTRODUCTION TO INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
T R 9:30-10:45

A discussion of caste, kinship, and marriage; religion, music and dance; and modern popular arts.

ANTH 281 HUMAN ORIGINS (3) HANTMAN
M W F 10:00 - 10:50

The course is intended to provide an overview and assessment of the theory, methods, and data used by anthropologists to reconstruct human physical and cultural evolution. Chronologically, the course spans the time from the initial appearance of hominids (ca 4.5 million years ago) to the period prior to the rise of urbanism and early state formation (ca 10,000 B.C.). The course is divided into three topical components: 1) a review of evolutionary theory, and the controversy surrounding that theory; 2) a n in depth survey of the data used to support current models of the pattern of human evolution, and 3) a study of the origins of modern human adaptations in the relatively recent past, with respect to uniquely human behaviors such as complex language, rit ual, religion and art.

ANTH 300A PERSPECTIVES FOR MAJORS (1) TBA
M 12:00 - 12:50

A course for majors and minors in the department designed to introduce them to a number of topics of concern to current anthropology. Majors and minors are expected to take this course at their first opportunity after joining the program. This course will also be offered in the Spring.

ANTH 301 HISTORY/THEORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY (3) MOORE
T R 12:30-1:45

An outline of the development of anthropology as a scholarly discipline stressing both its unfolding internal logic and its relation to "the rest" of the world. Themes include the dialectics of structure, function, conflict, and cultural style. Restricted to 3rd and 4th year Anthropology major.

ANTH 314 WRITING JEWISH CULTURE: FROM GHETTO TO MUSEUM (3) FELDMAN
M W F 12:00-12:50

The subject of this course is Jewish culture as it is represented in 20th-century social scientific and humanistic literature. The goal is not only to introduce students to some critical case studies in Jewish culture, but also to push them to engage tho se texts with insights drawn from current culture theory. The approach to the material will be chronological, selecting key texts from each decade across a period of eighty years, with particular emphasis on Jewish culture in Europe, the United States an d the Middle East. Although the list is not exhaustive, each book speaks to the innovations and persistent obsessions that mark this genre. Analysis, therefore, will take place at the level of close reading, as well as social-historical contextualizatio n. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 316/761 HINDU WORLD VIEW via MYTHS, NARRATIVES & COMMENTARIES (3) KHARE
T R 11:00-12:15

A discussion of selected aspects of the "unchanging"/"changing" Hindu world view, primarily via selected accounts of mythology, folktales and popular traditional stories, on the one hand, and striking cultural narratives, literary reflections and critical social commentaries, on the other. The class will explicate Hindu cultural forces, meanings and dilemmas ranging across the morally "eternal," historically contingent, and politically contested in contemporary India. The offering will be at two interre lated levels: to undergraduates to help understand the multifaceted Hindus, Hinduism and India in real life terms, and to graduates to re-view and evaluate the Hindu world's "inner" and "outer" tensions. Prerequisites: for undergraduates: ANTH 101 or a course in South Asian studies; permission of the instructor for graduate students.

ANTH 330 TOURNAMENTS AND ATHLETES (4) MENTORE
T R 1100-1215 plus obligatory discussion section

This course will offer you a cross-cultural study of competitive games. Criticizing current theories about the "innocence" of sports while comparing and contrasting various athletic events from societies around the world, it will provide an argument to e xplain the competitive bodily displays of athletes. It will select materials which allow you to examine bodily movement, meaning, context, and process, in addition to the relations between athletes, officials, spectators, and social systems. Its general thesis will be that sport brings out the universal morals of community, challenges and tests them in controlled and unthreatening genres, yet never defeats them or makes them appear unjust.

ANTH 324/724 RENUNCIATION AND POWER IN BUDDHIST SOCIETY (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 3:30-6:00

Examines the sociological characteristics of Buddhist monasticism and its relations with the state; the contemporary involvement of monks in social power.

ANTH 332 SHAMANISM, HEALING, AND RITUAL (3) TURNER
T R 1400 - 1515
Course Cancelled

The course delves into the sources of shamanism and ritual healing. It provides some understanding of their different logic's, and therefore why the methods heal. The class will "unpack" the meanings of a wide variety of contemporary non-Western rituals , keeping respect for their veridicy and effectiveness. Emphasis is laid on human, personal experience of these forms to complement the extensive descriptive and analytical literature that exists. The authors to be covered include Jung, Victor Tureen, P eters, Friedson, Goulet, and Audrey Richards.

ANTH 344/744 NATIVE AMERICAN VERBAL ART (3) V. HYMES
T R 9:30-10:45

This course will deal with a wide range of the verbal art of Native American groups. The genre to which most attention will be given is oral narrative, but other genres such as announcements, orations, ritual discourse and songs will be covered in so far as good data about them is available. All genres will be situated in their original cultural context as well as in the post contact situation. One major topic will be a review of the ways in which, since contact, both Native American and outsiders such as anthropologists, missionaries and linguists have recorded these oral genres in writing. Special attention will be given to recent work which has recognized, in a variety of ways, the poetic nature of many of the genres. Attention will also be given to the creativity of different native voices in performance of what were once thought of by scholars as fixed memorized texts. Prerequisites: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor. Meets second writing and Non-Western Perspectives requirements.

ANTH 346 AFRICAN ORAL LITERATURE (3) SAPIR
M W 14:30-15:45
Postponed until the Spring of 2000

This semester (Fall 1999) the course will concentrate on the oral literature of the Sene-Gambia of West Africa. Two major topics will be an examination of Mandang Oral Epics and Kujamaat Jóola Extemporaneous Funeral Songs. We will also examine the genres of proverbs and folk tales among others. This course will be taught jointly with Professor Kandioura Drame of the French Department, where it is listed under a different number. Enrollment is limited to12 under Anthropology and 12 under French.

ANTH 347/747 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST (3) LEFKOWITZ
T R 12:30-13:45

This course provides an introduction to the people, cultures, and histories of the Middle East, through an examination of language-use in contemporary Middle Eastern societies. The course focuses on Israel/Palestine, and the contract between Hebrew and A rabic, as a microcosm providing insight into important social processes- - such as colonization, religious fundamentalism, modernization, and the changing status of women- - affecting the region as a whole. Readings contrast ethnographic with novelistic representations of language, society, and identity. A primary concern will be to compare social scientific and literary constructions of "self" and "other" in the context of the political and military confrontation between Israel and Palestine. This is a lecture and discussion course. A number of feature films from the Middle East are incorporated into the course material. Requirements include three short essays, a book review, and a research paper. Prerequisite: previous course in anthropology or Middle Eastern studies, or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 352 AMAZONIAN PEOPLES (3) UZENDOSKI
T 1600 - 1830

No description available at this time

ANTH 355 ANTHROPOLOGY OF EVERYDAY LIFE (3) DAMON
M W 1400 - 1515

Using production and exchange theories about society, this course creates an anthropological perspective on modern American society by analyzing attempts to impose order on the American Mind from the Second Great Awakening to the Present. This course beg ins by locating the consuming society of the present in dynamics found from urban America to the Texas panhandle and tamed Columbia River. We then take a historical tour beginning with the Second Great Awakening, ending with the paradoxes of gambling and scandals in the late 20th century. Particular emphasis will be put on trials and persecutional forms as mechanisms for dealing with the dialectics of order and its discontents. Data will range from monographic case studies to novels and movies. Three papers, two short (5+/-), one long (10+). Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 363 CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION (3) SHEPHERD
T R 12:30-13:45

This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional Chinese forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of Chinese marriage and domestic life , gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety. The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian t raditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered. Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in twentieth century Chinese life. This course will satisfy the second writing requirement. Meets Non-Western re quirements.

ANTH 367/767 SPAIN IN THE NEW EUROPE (3) DOUGLASS
T R 15:30-16:45

Spain, with its bullfights, flamenco dancing, and machismo, has always seemed "exotic" from a Euro-American perspective. This course is an ethnographic survey of Spain and Spanish cultures in relation to a changing Europe. Issues considered include nati onalism and ethnicity, the European Union, changing family structures, and contemporary cultural performances.

ANTH 401A ENVIRONMENT, SOCIETY and HISTORY in the PACIFIC
SENIOR SEMINAR (3) DAMON
M 1900-2130

This course has three foci. The first, conducted through group reading assignments and reports, will locate students in an overview of "Pacific" environments, social forms and histories, and provide a working context for the remainder of the course. The second, through a small number of common readings, will engage a comparison between the societies of Eastern Indonesia and Western Melanesia. The third portion of the course will focus on each individual student's major research project and paper. Stu dent research papers should draw from the first two foci but need not be confined to the two areas of Eastern Indonesia and Western Melanesia. Meets second writing requirement. Meets Non-Western Perspectives.

ANTH 401B HISTORICAL ETHNOGRAPHY (3) DEETZ
T Brooks Hall 1530-1645 B002

This seminar will address selected sets of documents including the published Records of Plymouth Colony, wills and probate inventories, as part of a long range program of what is known as demographic reconstitution, or record stripping. The course will b e largely devoted to the extraction and analysis of data from these sources, formulating and discussing various research questions, and continuing to build up a database which is part of an ongoing archaeological and documentary research project on the hi storical ethnography of seventeenth century Plymouth. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 401C SENIOR SEMINAR: KINSHIP, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY (3) McKINNON
T R 9:30-10:45

This seminar will explore the ways in which developments in science and technology are shaping what counts as kinship, as well as the ways in which understandings about kinship shape the practices of science and technology, and the legal interpretations o f those practices. We will focus on specific ethnographic examples from the new reproductive technologies, biogenetics, disease genealogies, and the human genome project. We will investigate the ways in which older ideas about kinship continue to inform these new technologies at the same time that the new technologies destabilize many of the foundational ideas about what constitutes kinship. In all of this, we will be concerned with the intersection between ideas about kinship and those concerning gend er, race, class, sexuality, species, and the relation between humans and machines. Each student will conduct a research project on a topic of his or her choosing and will write a 20-page seminar paper. Meets second writing requirement.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 534 ILLNESS IN AMERICAN SOCIETY (3) FRASER
F 14:00-16:30

We focus on illness because my claim is that it is often at moments of intense stress or reptures in the normalcy of the body's functioning that individuals/societies reflect on the taken for granted assumptions about self, family, community, social and p olitical institutions, the relation between normal and pathological, the roles of healers and patients, life and death. It is also true that as least for particular classes and social groupings writing about illness and the body is a form of therapeutic action. We will examine closely these claims and the writings done by those facing bodily distress. A research paper 15-20 pages, two shorter book reviews (5-7 pages) and one page reading-responses turned in every other week are the requirements for the course. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 540 LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3) DANZIGER
M 14:00 - 16:30

This is an advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically orie nted research. Advanced undergraduate students may also enroll in the course. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in perception and world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, universals and parti culars in language, language in history and pre-history, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation and the study of poetic language. Through readings and discussion, the implications of each of these topics for the general conduct of anthropology will be addressed. Evaluation is based on take-home essays and problem sets which are assigned throughout the semester. The course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology graduate and undergraduate students. It also counts toward the Linguistics major for graduate and undergraduate students.

ANTH 542 20th CENTURY LINGUISTIC THEORY (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
T R 2:00-3:15

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, paying attention both to theory and analytical practice, and trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the questions it asks about "languag e" and the fit between theory and analysis. Requirements include: two short papers (about 7 pp. each), two or three written homework assignments, an oral presentation on a scholar or school of linguistics, a take-home exam, and evidence (from classroom discussion) that you have been doing the readings. Prerequisite: a course in linguistics or linguistic anthropology, or permission of instructor.

ANTH 549A ETHNOPSYCHOLOGIES (3) DANZIGER
W 9:00-11:30

The ways in which people think abut minds and behaviors has recently become a topic of great interest in the social sciences. Using literature from anthropology, philosophy, psychology and linguistics, this seminar will explore the explicit and implicit ideas about minds and behaviors that are held in different cultures of the world. Our aim will be to arrive at a better understanding of whether the European-American social science model of psychology, or elements of it, can be called universal. If not , how can ideas from other cultures enrich our own psychological model? General problems involved in obtaining evidence in other cultures, the method of ethnography, and basic cultural psychology issues will be considered, as well as the developmental qu estion of how ideas about mind and behavior develop in the individual.

ANTH 577 CULTURAL INVENTORIES (3) WAGNER
T R 12:30-13:15

No description available at this time

ANTH 589A THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF SYMBOLISM (3) WATTENMAKER
W 4:00-6:30

Much controversy surrounds the question of whether anthropologists can investigate the symbolic aspects of society through archaeological research. This seminar course examines the theoretical underpinnings of this debate, the ways in which various archa eologists have studied the symbolic dimensions of societies, and the controversies surrounding their findings. Some of the topics we will examine include archaeological approaches to changing concepts of space and time, the symbolic uses of goods in vari ous societies, and the construction of social identity (particularly rank and gender). We will also discuss the symbolism of the past, and archaeological constructions of the past, to various modern societies.

ANTH 589B QUANTITATIVE METHODS I (3) MOST
F 9:30-12:00 Brooks Hall B002

This course provides an introduction to the use of statistics and quantitative methods in anthropology. Analytical techniques used to describe both anthropological and archaeological data sets are emphasized but experience has shown that students in soci ology, psychology, and nursing have little problem applying the statistical methods learned to their own data sets. The course focuses on descriptive statistics, probability and sampling, and univariate, multivariate and non-parametric statistics. No pr ior knowledge of statistics is necessary.

Course requirements: Timely completion of 8-10 weekly assignments and a research project/term paper (about 15-20 pages) involving the statistical analysis of a data set of your choice. (Students who lack a data set will have assistance in locating one w ith which they can work.)

ANTH 589C ORGANIZATION & CHANGE IN LATE PUEBLO PREHISTORY (3) PLOG
T 15:30-18:00

The post-Chaco Canyon era in the American Southwest is one of the most studied, yet least understood periods in the prehistory of the Pueblo region of the American Southwest. In this seminar we will examine some of the central issues concerning the centu ries from AD 1100 to 1600, including the nature of regional social relationships during the immediate post-Chaco period, conflict and cannibalism, the development of katsina ritual, abandonments, social differentiation and political hierarchies, and conti nuities and discontinuities between the prehistoric and historic periods.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 701 THE HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY (3) MCKINNON
TR 15:30-16:45

This seminar will provide a survey of anthropological theory from the late 19th-century up through the early 1970s. We will explore a diverse range of anthropological approaches developed over the course of the century, including: 19th-century evolutioni sm, Boasian cultural anthropology, British structural-functionalism, French structuralism, British symbolic anthropology, American cultural materialism and neo-evolutionism, and later American cultural anthropology. We will be concerned to understand the se approaches not only as theoretical frameworks for understanding other cultures, but also as cultural and historical productions, in themselves.

ANTH 703 ETHNOLOGY II (3) KHARE
T 15:30 - 18:00

A discussion of development of ethnography since the forties as a core anthropological method and discursive strategy, with special attention to changing directions, issues and debates surrounding ethnographic writing and cultural anthropological theories .

ANTH 705 DATA ANALYSIS (3) SHEPHERD
M W 3:30-4:45

This course is designed to follow a course on ethnographic methods and research design, and assumes students have had some experience practicing fieldwork methods of data gathering. (For some students the implications of the course material for research design will remain the primary focus). We will review selected methods and design issues, and proceed to the next stages of the research process: organizing data, analysis, write-up, and re-design. The course will be run as both seminar and writing wor kshop. Students will be expect to make numerous class presentations, and to submit drafts of work in progress. Students will experiment in their writing and analysis with a variety of conceptual approaches and ethnographic styles.

ANTH 708 CURRENT ISSUES IN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) HANTMAN
R 19:00-21:30pm

This eponymous course reviews current issues in anthropological archaeology. The course is recommended for graduate students who want a general overview of contemporary archaeology and those who seek a course in method and theory. While current and cont emporary are the words which guide the course and its reading list, the historical context of the course will be part of our concern. Undergraduate students must have permission of instructor and prior advanced archaeological course work. Evaluation bas ed on weekly 1-2 page papers and a seminar paper.

ANTH 724/324 RENUNCIATION AND POWER IN BUDDHIST SOCIETY (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 15:30-18:00

Examines the sociological characteristics of Buddhist monasticism and its relations with the state; the contemporary involvement of monks in social power.

ANTH 732: SEE ENAM 885/ANTH 732

This course will focus primarily on Anglo- and Afro-American traditional culture and, within that domain, deal with problems of definition, origin, collection, and analysis of the main genres of folklore--narrative and song.

NOTE: ENAM 885 is a graduate English course, cross-listed with Anthropology.

ANTH 733-ETHNOHISTORY: RESEARCH AND METHODS (3) CHARLES L. PERDUE, JR. & NANCY J. MARTIN-PERDUE
T R 14:00-15:15pm
FOLKLORE ARCHIVE: B001, BROOKS HALL

This course offers an introduction to ethnohistory, considers various sources and methods for conducting ethnohistorical research, and requires a practical application of these to an historical case study in Albermarle County. Conceptions of group identi ty and culture, or "ethnos"--based on race, ethnicity, class, or situation--and of the nexus between history and anthropology will be discussed, with some consideration given to contemporary ethnohistorical case studies that address issues of contact, con flict, control, and commodification.

ANTH 744 NATIVE AMERICAN VERBAL ART (3) V. HYMES
T R 9:30-10:45

This course will deal with a wide range of the verbal art of Native American groups. The genre to which most attention will be given is oral narrative, but other genres such as announcements, orations, ritual discourse and songs will be covered in so far as good data about them is available. All genres will be situated in their original cultural context as well as in the post contact situation. One major topic will be a review of the ways in which, since contact, both Native American and outsiders such as anthropologists, missionaries and linguists have recorded these oral genres in writing. Special attention will be given to recent work which has recognized, in a variety of ways, the poetic nature of many of the genres. Attention will also be given to the creativity of different native voices in performance of what were once thought of by scholars as fixed memorized texts. Prerequisites: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor. Meets second writing and Non-Western Perspectives requirements.

ANTH 746 SHAMANISM HEALING AND RITUAL (3) TURNER
T R 14:00-15:15

The course delves into the sources of shamanism and ritual healing. It provides some understanding of their different logic's, and therefore why the methods heal. The class will "unpack" the meanings of a wide variety of contemporary non-Western rituals , keeping respect for their veridicy and effectiveness. Emphasis is laid on human, personal experience of these forms to complement the extensive descriptive and analytical literature that exists. The authors to be covered include Jung, Victor Tureen, P eters, Friedson, Goulet, and Audrey Richards.

ANTH 747 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST (3) LEFKOWITZ
T R 12:30-13:45

This course provides an introduction to the people, cultures, and histories of the Middle East, through an examination of language-use in contemporary Middle Eastern societies. The course focuses on Israel/Palestine, and the contract between Hebrew and Arabic, as a microcosm providing insight into important social processes- - such as colonization, religious fundamentalism, modernization, and the changing status of women- - affecting the region as a whole. Readings contrast ethnographic wit h novelistic representations of language, society, and identity. A primary concern will be to compare social scientific and literary constructions of "self" and "other" in the context of the political and military confrontation between Israel and Palesti ne. This is a lecture and discussion course. A number of feature films from the Middle East are incorporated into the course material. Requirements include three short essays, a book review, and a research paper. Prerequisite: previous course in an thropology or Middle Eastern studies, or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 761/316 HINDU WORLD VIEW via MYTHS, NARRATIVES & COMMENTARIES (3) KHARE
T R 11:00-12:15

A discussion of selected aspects of the "unchanging"/"changing" Hindu world view, primarily via selected accounts of mythology, folktales and popular traditional stories, on the one hand, and striking cultural narratives, literary reflections and critical social commentaries, on the other. The class will explicate Hindu cultural forces, meanings and dilemmas ranging across the morally "eternal," historically contingent, and politically contested in contemporary India. The offering will be a t two interrelated levels: to undergraduates to help understand the multifaceted Hindus, Hinduism and India in real life terms, and to graduates to re-view and evaluate the Hindu world's "inner" and "outer" tensions. Prerequisites: for undergraduates : ANTH 101 or a course in South Asian studies; permission of the instructor for graduate students.

ANTH 767 SPAIN IN THE NEW EUROPE (3) DOUGLASS
T R 15:30-16:45

Spain, with its bullfights, flamenco dancing, and machismo, has always seemed "exotic" from a Euro-American perspective. This course is an ethnographic survey of Spain and Spanish cultures in relation to a changing Europe. Issues considered include nationalism and ethnicity, the European Union, changing family structures, and contemporary cultural performances.

ANTH 790 CULTURE, TIME AND IDENTITIES (3) MENTORE
W 15:30-17:45

This interdisciplinary course will bring together the perspectives of history and anthropology in exploring various ways of thinking about the lives, rituals, beliefs, and institutions that make up human societies. Reaching across geographic al boundaries, we will grapple with diverse issues--politics, community, religion, the family, the state, hierarchy, egalitarianism, everyday life--both as lived realities and as analytical categories, we will raise fundamental questions about how to conc eptualize social life. by relating practice and theory to one another in our readings, we will consider broad issues: what does culture mean and how it changes over item; what relation everyday life bears to larger ideas, such as national identities, id eologies, and politics; how change and continuity relate to one another in what we generally think of as historical time; what it means that there are different registers and understandings of time; how identities--racial, class, gender, ethnic, regional, professional, national--come to be; what role memory, myth, and history play in fashioning these identities? At the boundaries between disciplines, this course should be interesting to all students who want to broaden the repertoire of questions they br ing to their exploration of human societies.

ENAM 885/ANTH 732-AMERICAN FOLKLORE (3) PERDUE
T R 11:00-12:15

This course will focus primarily on Anglo- and Afro-American traditional culture and, within that domain, deal with problems of definition, origin, collection, and analysis of the main genres of folklore--narrative and song.

NOTE: ENAM 885 is a graduate English course, cross-listed with Anthropology.