1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Fall 2000

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Cultural Diversity Archaeology Linguistics
223,227,232,237,330
332,355,572,577
109A,109B,109C,
352,356,589C
280,388,389,589A,
589B
240,340,348,540
542,549B
Non-Western perspectives
101,109A,109B,232,240,
332,352,363
Senior Seminars 
401A, 401B, 401C,401D

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 101 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3) HANDLER
T R 8:00-9:15

An integrative survey with attention to the major sub-fields of anthropology: human origins, archaeology, anthropological linguistics, cultural anthropology, and folklore. This is a broad introductory course covering human evolution, the relationship of language to thought, cultural diversity and cultural relativity. Restricted to: First year, Second year. Meets Non-Western Perspectives Requirements
Course Web Page

ANTH 109A VIETNAMESE CULTURE (3) ROSS
W 4:00-6:30

This course examines the continuities and discontinuities in recurring themes of "traditional" Vietnamese culture. The class size is limited in order to facilitate class discussion and the sharing of study materials. Students will write several short essays on a variety of topics. Restricted to : Inst Permission. Meets Non-Western Perspective Requirements

ANTH 109C/AAS 205 TRAVEL ACCOUNTS AND ETHNOGRAPHIES OF AFRICA (3) SABEA
T R 9:30-10:45

The course explores how 18-19th century travel accounts about Africa have influenced ethnographic writings about the continent. Starting with contemporary US representations about Africa and anthropological reflections on the disciplines engagements with the Continent, we will trace the genealogy of basic concepts by reading travelers, missionaries, and explorers descriptions about their encounters in Central, Southern and Northern Africa. We will analyze the connections between the profession/gender of writers, their nationality, and their descriptions of the places they visited. We will move then to ethnographic accounts of the same regions to examine how the analysis of different areas within the Continent are premised on certain ideas about people and places, how these ideas are reproduced, and how they reflect heritages of the encounter between the "West" and "Africa". Theoretical and methodological questions of knowledge production, power and the development of disciplines will be examined.

ANTH 223 FANTASY & SOCIAL VALUES (3) WAGNER
T R 9:30-10:45

An examination of imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Attention is given to "alternate cultures" and fictional societal models. A "cultural imaginary" allows us to think carefully about implications of gender, technology, and social existence that we, for very good reasons, are not allowed to experiment upon. Three papers, mandatory attendance in lecture.

ANTH 227 RACE GENDER & MED (3) FRASER
M W 1530-1645

This course is designed to explore the social and cultural dimensions of biomedical practice and experience in the United States, with some cross-cultural material for comparative purposes. It focuses on practitioner and patient, asking about the ways in which race, gender, and socio-economic status contour professional identity and socialization, how such factors influence the experience of and course of illness, and how they have shaped the structures and institutions of biomedicine over time.

ANTH 232 SYMBOL AND RITUAL (3) METCALF
M W F 1000-1050

Ritual provides the characteristic approach of anthropology to the comparative study of religion, and the analysis of ritual is anthropology's major contribution to that project. Everywhere ritual permeates social life, yet in no other category of behavior is the exoticness of other cultures more striking. Consequently ritual presents a special challenge to anthropology. This course asks common-sense questions about what rituals mean, and show how far we have come to answering them in a century of theorizing.

ANTH 237 CULTURE HISTORY PHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M W F 1100-1150

This course is blocked out into three sections: (1) The nature of photography. What form of communication is it and what is unique about it. How do we "read" photographs and why are they always so ambiguous? What are the motivations for snapshots? (2) A survey of the history of photography from its invention at the beginning of the 19th century to the introduction of the Kodak in the 1880's; beyond that if time permits. Subjects to be covered: the people involved with the invention of photography; the early photographic processes; photographs of the places in the world, "views"; photographs of individuals, "likenesses"; photographs of "the other"; photographs in the archives-surveillance and the "criminal type," "genre photography;" photography as an art in the early years until the first decades of the 20th century. The work of particular photographers will be examined in detail. (3) We will conclude by returning to the general nature of photography this time considering the intrusiveness of the photographic act from the "Kodak fiend" to the paparazzi.

ANTH 240 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
T R 2:00-3:15

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists, and how data from languages are used in related fields as evidence of cultural, social, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication.

ANTH 280 INTRO. TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3) HANTMAN
T R 2:00-3:15

Topics include alternative theories of culture change, dating methods, excavation and survey techniques, and the reconstruction of the economy, social organization, and religion of prehistoric and historic societies. Case studies focus on New World cultures.

ANTH 300 PERSPECTIVES FOR MAJORS (1) T. B. A.
W 1300-1350

A course for majors for minors in the department designed to introduce them to a number of topics of concern to current anthropology. Majors and minors are expected to take this course at their first opportunity after joining the program. This course will also be offered in the Spring.

ANTH 301 HISTORY/THEORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY (3) BASHKOW
M W F 10:00-10:50

An outline of the development of anthropology as a scholarly discipline stressing both its unfolding internal logic and its relation to "the rest" of the world. Themes include the dialectics of structure, function, conflict, and cultural style. Restricted to 3rd and 4th year Anthropology majors.

ANTH 330 TOURNAMENTS AND ATHLETES (4) MENTORE
T R 11:00-12:15 plus obligatory discussion section

This course will offer you a cross-cultural study of competitive games. Criticizing current theories about the "innocence" of sports while comparing and contrasting various athletic events from societies around the world, it will provide an argument to explain the competitive bodily displays of athletes. It will select materials which allow you to examine bodily movement, meaning, context, and process, in addition to the relations between athletes, officials, spectators, and social systems. Its general thesis will be that sport brings out the universal morals of community, challenges and tests them in controlled and unthreatening genres, yet never defeats them or makes them appear unjust.

ANTH 332 SHAMANISM HEALING AND RITUAL (3) TURNER
T R 2:00-3:15

The course delves into the sources of shamanism and ritual healing. It provides some understanding of their different logic's, and therefore why the methods heal. The class will "unpack" the meanings of a wide variety of contemporary non-Western rituals, keeping respect for their veridicy and effectiveness. Emphasis is laid on human, personal experience of these forms to complement the extensive descriptive and analytical literature that exists. The authors to be covered include Jung, Victor Tureen, Peters, Friedson, Goulet, and Audrey Richards. oral genres in writing. Special attention will be given to recent work which has recognized, in a variety of ways, the poetic nature of many of the genres. Attention will also be given to the creativity of different native voices in performance of what were once thought of by scholars as fixed memorized texts.

Prerequisites: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor. Meets second writing and Non- Western Perspectives requirements.

ANTH 336-01 COLONIALISM AND ITS VISUAL CULTURES (3) BUCKLEY
MWF 1200-1250

This course uses the theories and methods developed in Visual Anthropology to analyze the dynamics of colonial encounter. We will examine those aspects of colonial power whose authority depended upon the exercise of certain regimes of visual representation and recognition--as well as the ways that this authority was contested, limited, and seized. In turn, we will consider how the structuring-effects of these visual cultures remain active in postcolonial contexts. Topics will include the "optics of truth" that informed the production of colonial and social-scientific ways of knowing the world, the politics of mimesis and masquerade, photography in colonial and postcolonial India, local acts of depicting of the history of newly independent nation-states, and the tournament of aesthetic judgement that presides over the international art trade in "exotic goods" between Africa and America. The course will be concerned mainly with still photography, with reference to painting, sculpture, fashion, and bodily adornment.

ANTH 340/740, STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH (3) DOBRIN
TR 1230-1345

The objective of this course is to help students understand the system of descriptive (as opposed to regulatory) rules underlying English grammar, and so to better appreciate the language and become better writers or educaters. We will begin the course by reading and thinking critically about variation and change in the English language. We will then learn the basic elements of English phonological and morphological description, examining the notion of 'part of speech' from both formal and functional perspectives. The remainder of the course will be spent exploring basic English sentence types, common phrase and clause patterns, and sentence transformations. Coursework will include weekly homework exercises, regular quizzes, and a cumulative final exam.

ANTH 348 LANGUAGE AND PREHISTORY (3) DANZIGER
TR 930-1045 

Course Description: This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics – the study of how languages change over time - and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider, for example, the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the comparative-historical requirement for Linguistics majors. Enrollment limit: 15

ANTH 352 AMAZONIAN PEOPLES (3) MENTORE
T R 3:00-4:15

Native Lowland South American people have been portrayed as "animistic", "totemic", "shamanic", "mythologic", "Dreauduan", "slash and burn horticulturalists", "stateless", "gentle", "fierce", and much more. What do these anthropological portraits mean and what do they contribute to the collective body of Western intellectual thought? Is there any relation between such thinking and the experience of being "Indian" in Amazonian societies? Are there any other ways of understanding the Amazonian social experiences? This course addresses these questions through a reading of the ethnography of the region. This course will satisfy the non-western perspective requirement.

ANTH 355 EVERYDAY LIFE IN AMERICA (3) DAMON
M W 2:00-3:15

Using production and exchange theories about society, this course creates an anthropological perspective on modern American society by analyzing attempts to impose order on the American experience from the Second Great Awakening to the present. The course begins by locating society in present day dynamics found from the Texas panhandle to the tamed Columbia River, and from Wall Street to Silicon Valley by way of urban America. We then take a historical tour beginning with the Second Great Awakening, ending with the paradoxes of gambling, religion and scandals in the late 20th century. Particular emphasis will be put on trials and persecutional forms as mechanisms for dealing with the dialectics of order and its discontents. Data will range from monographic case studies to novels and movies. Four papers, three short(3-8 pages), one long(10+).

This course meets the second writing requirement.

ANTH 356 ANTH OF CONTEMPORY INDIA (3) KHARE
T R 11:00-12:15

Reading and discussion of some major cultural and political developments in mainly post- independent India, with a focus on interdependent roles of India's political and religious "pathfinders," the expanding middle class, changing urban women, Dalits, and Indian public and print media.

ANTH 363 CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION (3) SHEPHERD
T R 12:30-1:45

This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional Chinese forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety. The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered. Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in twentieth century Chinese life. This course will satisfy the second writing requirement. Meets Non-Western requirements.

ANTH 388/788 AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) LAVIOLETTE
M W F 11:00 - 11:50

In this lecture and discussion class we begin with a brief overview of human evolution, from the earliest anstralopithecines to the emergence of modern humans in the Middle to Late Stone Age. We then slow the pace and deal in greater depth with Late Stone Age and Iron Age societies, through the archaeology of European colonialism. Although we cannot touch on all the topics of interest over this vast time period and continent, the goals of the course are to give you solid footing in the broad themes, most important details, and controversies in African Archaeology. Area of focus include great archaeological sites; hunter/gatherer societies; plant and animal domestication; technological and social innovations of the Iron Age; Nile Valley peoples; medium-range and large- scale societies; the archaeology of Islam; the Trans-Saharan, Atlantic and Indian Ocean trades; and the politics of archaeology in the developing nations on the African continent.

ANTH 389 SOUTHWEST ARCHAEOLOGY (3) WILLS
M W F 1200-1250

No Description

ANTH 401A SENIOR SEMINAR (3) DAMON
M 1900-2130 

The Kula Ring and its Cognates

This course has three foci. The first, conducted through group reading assignments and reports, will locate students in an overview of "Indo-Pacific" environments, social forms and histories, and provide a working context for the remainder of the course. The second, through a small number of common readings, will engage a comparison between places in contemporary South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia and Western Melanesia. The third portion of the course will focus on each individual student's major research project and paper. Student research papers should draw from the first two foci but need not be confined to the topics dealt with throughout the first two parts of the course. With permission this course may meet the second writing requirement.

ANTH 401B SENIOR SEMINAR (3) MCKINNON
T R 11:00-12:15

This seminar will explore the ways in which developments in science and technology are shaping what counts as kinship, as well as the ways in which understandings about kinship shape the practices of science and technology, and the legal interpretations of those practices. We will focus on specific ethnographic examples from the new reproductive technologies, biogenetics, disease genealogies, and the human genome project. We will investigate the ways in which older ideas about kinship continue to inform these new technologies at the same time that the new technologies destabilize many of the foundational ideas about what constitutes kinship. In all of this, we will be concerned with the intersection between ideas about kinship and those concerning gender, race, class, sexuality, species, and the relation between humans and machines. Each student will conduct a research project on a topic of his or her choosing and will write a 20-page seminar paper. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 401C SENIOR SEMINAR: (3) KHARE
T 3:30-6:00

A study and discussion of anthropology's roles in and contributions to contemporary world and some its problems, especially food and survival, gender inequality, caste-class-race, religion and ethnicity, and medicine and culture.

ANTH 401D NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORIES/CONTEMPORARY REPRESENTATIONS (3) HANTMAN
W 1900-2130

This seminar is intended to introduce students to the wide variety of cultures and diversity of histories combined under the label Native American. The course takes a comparative approach to examine current writing on the history and contemporary identity of Virginia's Indian tribal groups, the Pueblo people of the southwest, the Iroquois of the northeast, the Lakota Sioux, and others. Within and between case studies, we will focus on the nature of precolonial society, diverse responses to European colonialism, 19th and 20th century Indian struggle for survival and revival, and contemporary Indian identity politics.

After a brief review of American Indian histories across the continent, the course reading and discussion will address the questions of representation and identity (including the unique legal question of authenticity/recognition. We will then examine several histories in detail. In the last third of the class, students will be asked to study and lead discussion of at least one representation of American Indian culture and history produced for a broad public audience. These can include museum exhibits, film and television portrayals, literature, academic discourse, primary or secondary school textbooks, mass print media, Web pages, or other media approved by the instructor. Class discussion will focus on the juncture or disjuncture of the contemporary public representation of Native American culture and history with that presented in the literature reviewed in class.

A related goal is to encourage students to think about how the histories of non-western people are written and how they are represented in contemporary American culture.

Course meets second writing requirement. Restricted to 3rd and 4th year majors only.

 


Course open to Undergraduates and Graduates:

ANTH 540 LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3) DANZIGER
W 1400-1630 

This is an advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically oriented research. Advanced undergraduate students may also enroll in the course. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in perception and world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, universals and particulars in language, language in history and pre- history, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation and the study of poetic language. Through readings and discussion, the implications of each of these topics for the general conduct of anthropology will be addressed. Evaluation is based on take-home essays and problem sets which are assigned throughout the semester. The course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology graduate and undergraduate students. It also counts toward the Linguistics major for graduate and undergraduate students.

ANTH 542 20th CENTURY LINGUISTIC THEORY (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
M W 2:00-3:15

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, paying attention both to theory and analytical practice, and trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the questions it asks about "language" and the fit between theory and analysis. Requirements include: two short papers (about 7 pp. each), two or three written homework assignments, an oral presentation on a scholar or school of linguistics, a take-home exam, and evidence (from classroom discussion) that you have been doing the readings. Prerequisite: a course in linguistics or linguistic anthropology, or permission of instructor.

ANTH 549B ON TRANSLATION (3) SAPIR
M W 1700-1815

The course will consider the problems, choices, methodologies and politics of language translation. Run as a seminar, students will work through specific translation problems presenting their results to the class. Visitors from the University community will present translation problems they have encountered and solved. I hope to have a broad variety of languages represented. Prerequisite: a thorough reading knowledge of a second language.

ANTH 577 CULTURAL INVENTORIES (3) WAGNER
T R 11:00-12:15

No description

ANTH 589A THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF COLONIAL EXPANSIONS (3) LAVIOLETTE
T 1900-2130

This seminar explores the archaeology of colonialism by foregrounding the colonial enterprises Of European nations between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries against a backdrop of other expansions that have been studied archaeologically. We will draw on pertinent, recent literature on colonialism and colonial historiography to help inform our analyses of archaeological studies. We will trace the evolution of contact models used to interpret sites on colonial frontiers, and examine how very different archaeologically-known expansions, e.g. Uruk, Roman, and Bantu, are conceptualized in terms other than strictly those of colonialism. The core of the class will be close readings of case studies bringing to bear the above considerations. The work load will include a 20- page research paper for undergraduates and a 30-page paper for graduate students, plus active participation in weekly discussion, preparation of discussion questions, and presentation of readings.

ANTH 589B RITUAL IN PREHISTORY (3) WILLS
R 1900-2130

No Description

ANTH 589C LABOR, CAPITAL AND STATES IN CONTEMPORARY AFRICA (3) SABEA
F 10:00-12:30

Informed by labor and production theories this course examines one angle of the interface between Africa and the world by focusing on the relationship between international capital, systems of governance, and laboring people. Ethnographic case studies of various social organizational contexts through which this three-tiered relation can be explored will include mining corporations, plantations, conservation and parks, production of cash crops, arms and sex trade, military conscription, and working at ports/docks. Topics covered include: the multiple Meanings of labor and work experienced under diverse regimes of power, the social organization of work and its implications for self identification and group formation, the dynamics of organizing space and controlling people through work, the politics of labor under colonial and post-colonial regimes, and the repercussions of the so-called globalization on labor and social relations in the Continent.

 


Graduate courses:

ANTH 701 HIST OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY (3) MCKINNON
T R 1530-1645 

This seminar will provide a survey of anthropological theory from the late 19th-century up through the early 1970s. We will explore a diverse range of anthropological approaches developed over the course of the century, including: 19th-century evolutionism, Boasian cultural anthropology, British structural-functionalism, French structuralism, British symbolic anthropology, American cultural materialism and neo-evolutionism, and later American cultural anthropology. We will be concerned to understand these approaches not only as theoretical frameworks for understanding other cultures, but also as cultural and historical productions, in themselves.

ANTH 703 ETHNOLOGY II "THE ETHNOGRAPHIC BASIS"(3) METCALF
T R 1530-1645

This is a required course for graduate students in their third semester. Its purpose is to give a close reading to a range of primary ethnographies, some classic, others recent, which demonstrate a range of abstract theoretical paradigms being applied to real-world situations. Since ethnographies provide the basis for whatever truth claims anthropologists make it is essential that we learn to probe them to find out what their authors learned and how they learned it, whether their propositions carry conviction, and how they make themselves readable, assuming they do.

ANTH 705 DATA ANALYSIS (3) SHEPHERD
M W 1530-1645

This course is designed to follow a course on ethnographic methods and research design, and assumes students have had some experience practicing fieldwork methods of data gathering. (For some students the implications of the course material for research design will remain the primary focus). We will review selected methods and design issues, and proceed to the next stages of the research process: organizing data, analysis, write-up, and re-design. The course will be run as both seminar and writing workshop. Students will be expect to make numerous class presentations, and to submit drafts of work in progress. Students will experiment in their writing and analysis with a variety of conceptual approaches and ethnographic styles.

ANTH 715 BOASIAN ANTHROPOLOGY (3) BASHKOW
M 1900-2130*

No Description Available

ANTH/ENAM 734 LIFE HISTORY AND ORAL HISTORY (3) PERDUE
T R 1400-1515

This course offers an in-depth study of the life history and its use as a sociocultural document, and of oral history methodology. Students will read and critique various works, both historical and contemporary, that use oral history or present what various scholars have termed: personal narrative, personal experience story, life history, conversational narrative, or negotiated biography. Practical experience will be gained in conducting interviews and writing life histories.

ANTH 746 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY CONTINI-MORAVA
W 820-1050

A forum for faculty and graduate students in linguistic anthropology to present and discuss work in progress. Prerequisite: graduate student status and completion of ANTH 540 or equivalent.

ANTH 748 LANGUAGE AND PREHISTORY (3) DANZIGER
TR 930-1045

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics – the study of how languages change over time - and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider, for example, the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills a linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology graduate students and also fulfills the comparative-historical requirement for Linguistics graduate students. Enrollment limit: 5

ANTH 763 CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION (3) SHEPHERD
T R 1230-1345*

This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional Chinese forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety. The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered. Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in twentieth century Chinese life.

ANTH 788 AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) LAVIOLETTE
M W F 1100-1150

In this lecture and discussion class we begin with a brief overview of human evolution, from the earliest australopithecines to the emergence of modern humans in the Middle to Late Stone Age. We then slow the pace and deal in greater depth with the Late Stone Age and Iron Age societies, up through the archaeology of European colonialism. Although we cannot touch on all the topics of interest over this vast time period and continent, the goal of the course are to give you solid footing in the broad themes, most important details, and controversies in African archaeology. Areas of focus include great archaeological sites; hunter/gatherer societies; plant and animal domestication; technological and social innovations of the Iron Age; Nile Valley people; medium-range and large- scale societies; the archaeology of Islam; the trans-Saharan, Atlantic and Indian Ocean trades; and the politics of archaeology in the developing nations on the African continent.

ANTH 789A SOUTHWEST ARCHAEOLOGY (3) WILLS
M W F 1200-1250

No Description