1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Fall 2002

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Cultural Diversity Archaeology Linguistics
223, 224, 225, 330, 332
355, 529A, 529B, 577
260,305,352,354
363,367,529C,529D
280,348,356,388
359A,589B
341,348,504,540
Non-Western perspectives
260,305,332,352,354,529C
Senior Seminars 
401A, 401B, 401C

Undergraduate Courses:

 ANTH 223 FANTASY & SOCIAL VALUES (3) WAGNER
TR 0930-1045

An examination of imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Attention is given to "alternate cultures" and fictional societal models. A "cultural imaginary" allows us to think carefully about implications of gender, technology, and social existence that we, for very good reasons, are not allowed to experiment upon. Three papers, mandatory attendance in lecture.

ANTH 224 PROGRESS (3) METCALF
MW 1100-1150

Westerners have been deeply attached to the idea of progress since the Enlightenment. But it is not universal; elsewhere and at other times people have seen a world in decline from a Golden Age. In the nineteenth century rapid technological development inspired an almost limitless confidence in progress, but at the same time the success of evolutionary theories introduced a more somber note of extinction for those left behind in the struggle. This course raises a series of questions about our notion of progress: What are its ideological roots? How is technical progress related to social or moral progress? At the beginning of a new century, what threats undermine our confidence in progress? The course includes two lectures per week plus a discussion section.

ANTH 225 NATIONALISM, RACISM, MULTICULTURALISM (3)HANDLER
MW 1400-1515

Introductory course in which the concepts of culture, multiculturalism, race, racism, and nationalism are critically examined in terms of how they are used and structure social relations in American society and, by comparison, how they are defined in other cultures throughout the world.

ANTH 229 AMERICAN WESTS (3) HANTMAN
TR 1230-1320

Anthropology professor Jeff Hantman, history professor Peter Onuf, and Media Studies postdoctoral fellow Doug Seefeldt will lead this new and innovative course about the peoples and cultures of the American West. The course will range in chronological scope from initial human settlement through the twentieth century. Students will explore the many different ways in which Americans, and others, have defined and redefined the West. Sponsored by the University’s Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Project, American Wests will incorporate the perspectives and methodologies of a number of other disciplines. Students can anticipate guest lectures from, for example, art historians, biologists, environmental scientists, and English professors. Topics will include images of the mythical West, Native American peoples and cultures, the environment and the extraction of natural resources, the development of public policy, and visual representations of the American West. Course requirements will include approximately 125 pages of primary and secondary source reading per week, two mid-semester take-home exams, a blue-book final exam, and a paper. In addition, students should expect to attend two lectures and a discussion section each week. Participation in class discussion will be emphasized, and so each discussion section is capped at 15 students.

ANTH 237 CULTURE & HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
MWF 1100-1150

This course is blocked out into three sections: (1) The nature of photography. What form of communication isit and what is unique about it? How do we "read" photographs and why are they always so ambiguous? What are the motivations for snapshots? (2) A survey of the history of photography from its invention at the beginningof the 19th century to the introduction of the Kodak in the 1880's; beyond that if time permits. Subjects to be covered: the people involved with the invention of photography; the early photographic processes; photographs of places in the world; "views"; photographs of individuals, "likenesses"; photographs of "the other"; photographs in the archives - surveil lance and the "criminal type," "genre photography;" photography as an art in the early years until the first decades of the 20th century. The work of particular photographers will be examined in detail. (3). We will conclude by returning to the general nature of photography, this time considering the intrusiveness of the photographic act from the "Kodak fiend" to the paparazzi. This course is an elective in the anthropology major and fulfills a humanities requirement in the college, not social science, beginning this semester. Click here for course web site.

ANTH 300 PERSPECTIVES FOR MAJORS (1) TBA
M 1300-1350

A course for majors and minors in the department designed to introduce them to topics of concern to current anthropology. This course is offered each semester, and also topics of relevance for students interested in pursuing anthropology in various ways after graduation. Majors and minors are expected to take this course at their first opportunity after joining the program.

ANTH 301 HISTORY AND THEORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY (3) BASHKOW
MWF 1100-1150

This course is designed for students who are majoring in anthropology: it presents a broad historical outline of major approaches and debates in the field, and seeks to foster skills in critically reading and discussing social and cultural theory. By reading sample works we will learn about the approaches of social evolutionism, diffusionism, Boasian particularism, l'Année Sociologique, British structural functionalism, French structuralism, symbolic anthropology, Marxist anthropology, cultural materialism, neo-evolutionism, structural history, postmodern anthropology, feminist anthropology, practice theory, postcolonial criticism, and globalization/transnational studies. We will attempt to understand past anthropological theories in relation to key debates of their time, while also considering their larger cultural-historical context and their enduring relevance. We will ask: What are the sources (and kinds) of modern anthropological concepts of culture? How have anthropological theories reflected and come to grips with the culture of the theorists? What have scholars learned, and been forced to unlearn, about humanity in studying other cultural worlds?

Restricted to 3rd and 4th year Anthropology majors, or by instructor permission. Meets the second writing requirement.

ANTH/AAS 305 TRAVEL ACCOUNTS OF AFRICA (3) SABEA
M 1530-1800

The course explores how 18th and 19th century travel accounts about Africa have influenced ethnographic writings and popular views about the continent and its people. It traces the genealogy of methods of knowledge production, major concepts that are generated and inherited, underlying assumptions and recurring images that have shaped the representation of a place and people. We will analyze the accounts produced about Africa with special focus on categories of gender, nationality, profession of the authors, the purposes underlying their encounters, and the times and places they visited.

ANTH 330 TOURNAMENTS AND ATHLETES (4) MENTORE
TR 1100-1215

This course will offer you a cross-cultural study of competitive games. Criticizing current theories about the "innocence" of sports while comparing and contrasting various athletic events from societies around the world, it will provide an argument to explain the competitive bodily displays of athletes. The materials will allow you to examine bodily movement, meaning, context, and process, in addition to the relations between athletes, officials, spectators, and social systems. Its general thesis will be that sport brings out the universal morals of community, challenges and tests them in controlled and unthreatening genres, yet never defeats them or makes them appear unjust. The student must enroll in one of the obligatory discussion sections in 330D.

ANTH 332 SHAMANISM & HEALING (3) TURNER
TR 1230-1345

The course delves into the sources of shamanism and ritual healing. It provides some understanding of their different logics, and therefore why they communicate and heal. The class will "unpack" the meanings of contemporary non-Western rituals, keeping respect for their veridicy and effectiveness. Emphasis is given to the human, personal experience of ritual as living process to complement the extensive descriptive and analytic literature that exists. Experience of ritual being its actual life, we will learn how to approximate the sense of ritual by enacting it. A term paper is required, also short papers during the term. This course meets the second writing requirement.

ANTH 341 SOCIOLINGUISTICS (3) NEVINS
TR 1530-1645

This course is designed to introduce students to thefoundations, concepts, and methods of sociolinguistics.Sociolinguistics takes as its focus the interaction betweenlanguage and social life. The course will move from anexamination of the conceptual foundations ofsociolinguistics to an exploration of its scope andapplication in research. In addition to introducingstudents to basic terms and concepts of the field, wewill conduct in-depth analyses and comparisons ofethnographies. Prerequisites: Anthropology 101, or LNGS325, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 348 LANGUAGE & PREHISTORY (3) DANZIGER
MW 0900-0950

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics-the study of how languages change over time -and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider for example the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. Examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan languages of Central America, and will include discussion of pre-Columbian Mesomerican writing systems and their ongoing decipherment. Over the semester, students will be responsible for completing several homework assignments based on course content, and a final exam.

ANTH 352 AMAZONIAN PEOPLES (3) MENTORE
TR 1500-1615

Native Lowland South American people have been portrayed as "animistic," "totemic," "shamanic," "mythologic," "Dreauduan," "slash and burn horticulturalists," "stateless," "gentle," "fierce," and much more. What do these anthropological portraits mean and what do they contribute to the collective body of Western intellectual thought? Is there any relation between such thinking and the experience of being "Indian" in Amazonian societies? Are there any other ways of understanding the Amazonian social experiences? This course addresses these questions through a reading of the ethnography of the region. This course will satisfy the non-western perspectives requirement.

ANTH 354 PEOPLES OF THE SOUTHWEST (3) CHAMBERLAIN
MW 1400-1515

The course will integrate archaeological, ethnohistoric, and ethnographic studies to discuss people of the American southwest.

ANTH 355 EVERYDAY LIFE IN AMERICA (3) DAMON
MWF 1100-1150

Using production and exchange theories about society, this course creates an anthropological model about modern forms of life by analyzing attempts to impose order on the US experience in North America. The course begin s by locating us in present-day dynamics found from the Texas panhandle to the tamed Columbia River, and from Wall Street to Silicon Valley by way of urban America. We then take a historical tour beginning with religious transformations in the early 19th century, ending with the paradoxes of gambling, religious and legal literalism, and the political and economic scandals that mark contemporary debate. Particular emphasis will be put on trials and persecutional forms as mechanisms for dealing with the dialectics of order and its discontents. Data will range from monographic case studies to novels and movies. Four papers, three short (2-8 pages), one long (10+). This course meets the second writing requirement. Students are encouraged to enroll in one a one-credit discussion section.

ANTH 356 /ARH 356 VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE (3) UPTON
TR 1100-1215

American Vernacular Architecture introduces a variety of North American vernacular building traditions, examining the design and building traditions of a variety of ethnic and regional cultures, the ways buildings and landscapes are used, and what they mean to their builders and users. Among the topics to be explored will be rural and urban house types, vernacular building systems, commercial architecture, the public landscape, and the vernacular landscapes of work and of religion, focusing on European, African, and Native American traditions that shaped the most familiar and widespread folk architectures, as well as on the urban landscapes of 19th- and 20th-century African Americans and European and Asian immigrants. In every case, we will look at built environments as expressions of ethnic and racial identity, organizers of social life, and conscious works of art.

ANTH 363 CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1230-1345

This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional Chinese forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety. The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered. Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in twentieth-century Chinese life. This course will satisfy the Second Writing Requirement. Meets Non-Western requirements.

ANTH 367/767 TIBETAN AND HIMALAYAN ANTHROPOLOGY (3) SIHLÉ
TR 1230-1345

This course aims at providing a balanced, anthropological outlook on a complex, and culturally diverse area, on which the West has massively projected its own fantasies: that of the Tibetan and Himalayan societies. Culturally related societies situated more to the east, such as societies speaking Tibeto-Burman tongues in South-western China, shall occasionally also be taken under scrutiny. Topics investigated shall include political and social organization, economy, cultural contacts, ethnicity, and religious forms.

ANTH 388/788 AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (4) LAVIOLETTE
TR 0930-1045

This course surveys the archaeological knowledge currently available about the African continent. The emphasis will be on the Late Stone Age, when fully modern humans dominate the cultural landscape, and the subsequent Iron Age, but will also briefly cover pre-modern humans and the archaeology of the colonial period. We will cover the great social, economic, and cultural transformations in African history known primarily through archaeology, and the most important archaeological sites and discoveries on the continent. Throughout the course a theme will be the politics of the past, and the changing role of the practice of archaeology in Africa.

ANTH 401A SENIOR SEMINAR: SOCIAL INEQUALITY & RELIGIOUS OTHERS (3) KHARE
T 1530-1800

A seminar on anthropology of social inequality, devoted to examining differences and conflicts expressed by the body, gender, caste, class, race, and religious ideology. With a comparative focus on similarities and differences in India and America, the class will analyze specific issues surrounding conflicting religious groups, women, immigrants, and subaltern/marginal group like Dalits and tribals.

This seminar will explore the ways in which developments in science and technology are shaping what counts as kinship, as well as the ways in which understandings about kinship shape the practices of science and technology, and the legal interpretations of those practices. We will focus on specific ethnographic examples from the new reproductive technologies, biogenetics, and disease genealogies. We will investigate the ways in which older ideas about kinship continue to inform these new technologies at the same time that the new technologies destabilize many of the foundational ideas about what constitutes kinship. In all of this, we will be concerned with the intersection between particular cultural ideas about kinship and those concerning gender, race, class, and sexuality. Each student will conduct a research project on a topic of his or her choosing and will write a 20-page seminar paper.

ANTH 401C SENIOR SEMINAR: ENDANGERED LANGUAGES (3) DOBRIN
R 1530-1800

Over the next century it is predicted that, continuing a trend, between 50% and 90% of the world’s languages will cease to be spoken. Many of these cases represent voluntary “shifts” in allegiance from the traditional language of a speech community to a more prestigious alternative. What are the forces that impel speakers toward language shift? What happens, linguistically, in the process? Can–and should–anything be done to slow the trend? This course addresses the issues of language endangerment, death, and maintenance, with an eye toward understanding the sociopolitical, practical, and linguistic dimensions of the problem and any possible solution(s). Each student will be assigned a language case from the literature, which he or she will research independently, present in the seminar, and become the resident authority on for the purpose of seminar discussions.

 


Undergraduates & Graduate Courses:

ANTH 504 LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
M 1900-2130

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include one paper on phonology, one on morphology, and one on syntax (the nature of the assignment may vary depending on the particular language being studied).

ANTH 529A TOPICS IN RACE THEORY (3) MARSHALL
T 15:30-1800

"Gender/Race and Power" will explore the imbrications of race and gender within and without the African Diaspora, with regard to questions of State power, conquest, colonialism/postcolonialism and global capitalism. We will be particularly attentive to the shortcomings of "race theory" in regard to gender and sexuality, and will attempt to chart masculinist assumptions within "canonical" race theory. Requirements: responsibility for leading each seminar; weekly précis on the readings; a final 20 page + bibliography paper. Course meets the Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 529B MIGRANTS & TRANSNATIONALS (3) SABEA
R 1800-2100

This course explores the relationship between migration and transnational paradigms in dealing with the movement of people across and within state boundaries. Is the shift in paradigm one of rhetoric or does it bespeak a conceptual rethinking? By analyzing ethnographic case studies, we will focus on the larger historical context in which these paradigms developed, the central categories that underlie them (e.g., nation, state, citizenship, tribe, race, gender, capital, labor), and the connections drawn between culture, society, polity and economy. Questions of changing political economic structures, labor movements, property relations, and identity politics will be examined.

ANTH 529C RELIGION, CULTURE & NATION IN ASIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 1530-1800

An exploration of the cultural context of nationalism in Asia. Religion and culture in the articulation of nation and state in selected ethnographic examples.

ANTH 529D RELIGIOUS SPECIALISTS IN BUDDHIST AND OTHER ASIAN CONTEXTS (3) SIHLÉ
W 1530-1800

This seminar aims at investigating the growing body of ethnographic literature devoted to various types of religious specialists in a number of Asian contexts. These range from South-east Asian, urban or forest-dwelling Theravada monks, to South Asian Brahmans and ascetics, and to Himalayan, Buddhist or Hindu, Tantric priests, shamans, and sacrificers. In most of the ethnographic cases we shall examine, in which religious specialists of different traditions exist side by side, these are defined locally, at least partly, in contrast with each other. In such contexts, the study of one particular type necessarily entails a study of the broader configuration constituted by the various, local, religious figures. One of the main objectives of this seminar is to take up the study of some of these local configurations from a comparative perspective. In light of these materials, we will try to reassess a number of theoretical distinctions, among which are notably Weber and Dumont's polarities in matters of religious types.

ANTH 540 LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3) DANZIGER
TR 0930-1045

This is an advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically oriented research. Advanced undergraduate students may also enroll in the course. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in perception and world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, universals and particulars in language, language in history and pre-history, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation and the study of poetic language. Through readings and discussion, the implications of each of these topics for the general conduct of anthropology will be addressed. Evaluation is based on take-home essays and problem sets which are assigned throughout the semester. The course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology graduate and undergraduate students. It also counts toward the Linguistics major for graduate and undergraduate students.

ANTH 577 CULTURAL INVENTORIES (3) WAGNER
TR 1100-1215

Just what, precisely, is a cultural inventory, if not a list of words or the things they stand for? If "we picture facts to ourselves" (Wittgenstein), and the fact of the picture is the picture of the fact, we would mean the imagery of a culture and its reflection in the world. This is a course in the cultural imaginary.

ANTH 589A POLITICS OF THE PAST (3) WATTENMAKER
M 1900-2130

In many societies, beliefs about history form an integral component of social identity. This makes archaeology, which seeks to construct and understand the history of cultures and regions, deeply meaningful to modern populations living in areas where research is underway. Moreover, archaeological results are sometimes viewed as having bearing on modern political conflicts over issues such as land claims. This seminar examines the dynamic relationship between the past and the present from a number of different angles. For example, we explore why and how views about the past help shape aspects of identity, and how different interest groups manipulate understanding of the past to further their political agendas. We will also consider how the understanding archaeologists have of their own culture in relation to others shapes the ways that the past is portrayed in films, museum exhibits and scholarly literature. Specific issues and case studies from various parts of the world, such as the excavation of Native American cemetery sites, serve to highlight some of the ways that the past and present intersect, the impact modern politics has on the ways archaeologists work, and the kinds of political issues archaeologists confront in their research. Please contact instructor if enrolling in course.

Anth 589B ISSUES IN SOUTHWEST PREHISTORY (3) PLOG/MOST
TR 0930-1045

Discussions will emphasize recent research on key questions regarding culture change including the nature of political complexity, the formation of social boundaries, major demographic fluctuations, and the development of ritual and ideology.

ANTH 589C/ARH 789 EVERYDAY: ORDINARY, EXTRORDINARY (3) UPTON
T 1530-1800

This seminar looks at the construction and experience of the commonplace, the ordinary places we visit every day and the things we do there. At the same time, it will also ask about ways that the banal is made extraordinary, for example through the construction of odd or striking buildings or landscapes (such as roadside structures or "outsider" art), the attribution of religious significance to otherwise unexceptional spaces, or the commemoration of catastrophic or exceptional events in ordinary spaces. Our exploration will draw on a variety of disciplinary stances and theoretical writings, including older studies of the folk and the vernacular, current works on the "everyday" by Lefebvre, de Certeau, Bourdieu, and others, and psychological and philosophical works on perception, cognition, and concepts of the self.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 701 HISOTRY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY (3) DAMON
W 1900-2130

This course explores the diverse intellectual roots of Anthropology from the 18th century to the mid 20th. We attempt to keep clear the differences and interweavings amongst US, English, and French traditions that lay the groundwork for late 20th and early 21st century Anthropology

ANTH 703 ETHNOLOGY II - THE ETHNOGRAPHIC BASIS (3) SAPIR
MW 1530-1645

This is a required course for graduate students in their third semester. Its purpose is to give a close reading to a range of primary ethnographies and similar documents, some classic, others recent. Since these documents provide the basis for whatever truth claims anthropologists make it is essential that we learn to probe them, to find out what their authors learned and how they learned it, whether their propositions carry conviction, and how they make themselves readable, assuming they do.

ANTH 705 DATA ANALYSIS (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1400-1515

This course is designed to follow a course on ethnographic methods and research design, and assumes students have had some experience practicing fieldwork methods of data gathering. (For some students the implications of the course material for research design will remain the primary focus.) We will review selected methods and design issues, and proceed to the next stages of the research process: organizing data, analysis, write-up, and re-design. The course will be run as both seminar and writing workshop. Students will be expected to make numerous class presentations, and to submit drafts of work in progress. Students will experiment in their writing and analysis with a variety of conceptual approaches and ethnographic styles.

ANTH 706 GRANT WRITING (3) MCKINNON
W 1830-2100

This course is designed specifically for those graduate students who will be actively applying for research grants beginning in the fall 2002 and spring 2003. We will produce drafts of grant proposals appropriate to submit to such agencies as the Wenner-Gren Foundation, Fulbright and Fulbright-Hays, and National Science Foundation.

ANTH 708 ADVANCED METHOD & THEORY IN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) HANTMAN

Postponed until the Spring of 2003

Seminar in current methodological and theoretical issues in archaeology and the historical context of debate on these issues. Topics include, but are not limited to agency, gender, households and regional systems, exchange, style, political structures, and public archaeology.

ANTH 714 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY (3) BASHKOW
MW 1530-1645

This graduate seminar offers a selective introduction to contemporary authors and current approaches in the history of anthropology. It is primarily a reading seminar, in which we will read and discuss recent writings that deal with various topics in anthropology’s history, clustering primarily around two broad areas: (1) Boasian anthropology, its background in German Counter-Enlightenment scholarship, and its relation to American modernism; and (2) the colonial situation of anthropology, particularly in Britain but also in the U.S. Subsidiary topics include non-canonical anthropologists, the problem of ethnographic restudies, ideas of civilization and race, and the institutional, social, and political contexts of anthropological knowledge. For the most part, we will be reading works that have been published in the last several years, though we will begin by reading George Stocking’s seminal essays on the historiography of anthropology, social evolutionism, and Boasian anthropology from Race, Culture, and Evolution. Other authors we will read include James Clifford, Richard Handler, Henrika Kuklick, Regna Darnell, Lee Baker, Lyn Schumaker, Maria Lepowsky, Susan Hegeman, Matti Bunzl, Curtis Hinsley, Patrick Wolfe, William Pietz, Peter Pels, Gloria Goodwin Raheja, and Nicholas Dirks. Where possible, we will read books along with published reviews of them in scholarly journals. Course requirements are three seminar presentations (with handouts), participation in discussion, and a book review written in the style of anthropological journals.

Click here for course web page

ANTH 734 LIFE HISOTRY AND ORAL HISTORY(3) PERDUE & PERDUE
TR 1400-1515

This course offers an in-depth study of the life history and its use as a sociocultural document, and of oral history methodology. Students will read and critique various works, both historical and contemporary, that use oral history or present what various scholars have termed: personal narrative, personal experience story, life history, conversational narrative, or negotiated biography. Practical experience will be gained in conducting interviews and writing life histories.

ANTH 738 TOPICS IN THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE BODY (3) MARSHALL
R 1900-2130

"Topics in Anthropology of the Body" will explore the body as a critical site for the instantiation/creation/recreation of culture/history/power. On one hand we will attend to the relationship between bodies and structure, specifically exploring the impact of (nation) states on and through bodies, in regarding to policing, imprisonment, "rehabilitation," and healing. On the other hand we will look closely at how the body is a site for creative processes of agency/resistance to power and structure. Course requirements: responsibility for leading each seminar; weekly précis on the readings; a final 20 page + bibliography paper on theoretical/ethnographic issues.

ANTH 748/348 LANGUAGE & PREHISTORY (3) DANZIGER
MW 0900-0950

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics-the study of how languages change over time -and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider for example the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. Examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan languages of Central America, and will include discussion of pre-Columbian Mesomerican writing systems and their ongoing decipherment. Over the semester, students will be responsible for completing several homework assignments based on course content, and a final exam.

ANTH 763 CHINESE FAMILY & RELIGION (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1230-1345

This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional Chinese forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety. The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered. Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in twentieth century Chinese life.

ANTH 767 TIBETAN AND HIMALAYAN ANTHROPOLGY (3) SIHLÉ
TR 1230-1345

Cf. ANTH 367 above for a description of the course.

ANTH 787 TOPICS IN AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) LAVIOLETTE
TR 1230-1345

This is a graduate class in advanced topics in African archaeology. It will focus on major recent developments on the continent, and on archaeological theory that has been or could be best applied to African archaeology.

ANTH 788/388 AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) LAVIOLETTE
TR 0930-1045

See the description for ANTH 388. Graduate students who take this course will attend lectures and prepare a major research paper on a topic of their choice.

ANTH 791 ANTHRO & MODERNITY (3) METCALF
W 1900-2130

Anthropology has had an unstable and ambiguous relationship to "modernity," in all its different forms. In the nineteenth century the founders of the discipline were clearly in the vanguard, but it does not follow that succeeding generations of anthropologists who rejected them were anti-modernist. To what extent has anthropology been involved in reactionary romanticism? Is a post-progressivism still part of our agenda? Or was anthropology post-modern even before the term was invented? This course addresses these questions by relating the work of such authorities as Berman, Harvey, and Latour to recent anthropological theory.