1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Fall 2008

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics

236,254,258, 303A, 334,302A,302B,529A,529B

291A,291B,291C,367, 350,554,557,559

282, 307,384,390, 398,480,588,589,592

242,341,349,504,549

Non-Western perspectives for the majors
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern equirement)
401A,401B,401C,401D 01,401A,401B,401C,401D
101,230,240,319,322,352,347, 357,363,370,372
Senior Seminars

401a, 401b, 401c

Second Writing Requirement
355,363,370,401A,401B,401C 529A,529C,592

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 101 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 JOHNSEN
MWF 09:00-09:50

In this course we will introduce how and why anthropology examines the uniformities and regularities it perceives as existing in social life -- the perceived order that members of society produce so as to live together. We will read, write, and talk about these instances of eradicated contradictions not as isolated and self-contained institutions but as part of a meaningful and systemic thought process. The study of kinship and marriage, love and moral obligation, economic production and exchange, religious beliefs and values, as well as political power and its distribution will be our principal topics. Satisfies College's Non-Western Perspective Requirement.

ANTH 219 DESIRE & WORLD ECONOMICS 3.0 MENTORE
TR 1100-1215

Because of the current woeful lack of understanding about the economies of other societies, this course offers an insight into the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services practiced by peoples ignored or unknown to classic Western economics. Its principle focus will open upon the obvious differences between cultural concepts of the self and the very notion of its desire. Such arguments as those which theorize on the "rationality" of the market and the "naturalness" of competition will be debunked through the critical purvey of alternative subjectivities. More substantively the course will present societies of the gift, barter, and monetary exchange; the morality of consumption; the value and ethics of production; to name but a few of the topics covered.

ANTH 223 FANTASY & SOCIAL VALUES 3.0 WAGNER
TR 0930-1045

An examination of imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Attention is given to "alternate cultures" and fictional societal models. A "cultural imaginary" allows us to think carefully about implications of gender, technology, and social existence that we, for very good reasons, are not allowed to experiment upon. Three papers, mandatory attendance in lecture.

ANTH 224 PROGRESS 3.0 METCALF
MW 1600-1650

Since the Enlightenment, Westerners have been deeply attached to the idea of progress. In the nineteenth century, rapid technological development inspired an almost limitless confidence in the upward progress of humanity, expressed in theories of social evolution.These same theories introduced, however, somber themes of extinction for those left behind in the struggle. This course raises a series of questions about progress. What are its ideological roots? How is technical progress related to social or moral progress? What threats menace it?

ANTH 230 BUDDHISM IN ASIAN SOCIETIES 3.0 SIHLÉ
TR 1400-1515

This course is an examination of Buddhism in contemporary Asian societies, from an anthropological perspective. This course will challenge common reductive depictions of Buddhism as primarily philosophical or “spiritual”, and highlight how socially embedded and historically situated the various forms of Buddhism are. Doctrinal and historical aspects, beyond a brief introduction at the beginning of the course, will not be a major focus in themselves. Rather, through a selection of ethnographic studies, this course will focus on analyzing a strikingly diverse array of contemporary living traditions, stretching from Sri Lanka, Thailand and Burma to Tibet, parts of Nepal, and Japan. The fundamental, overarching aim will be to reconsider critically our assumptions of what “religion” is.

Prior coursework in anthropology or religion is not required. Students must however be ready to engage in a relatively challenging course.

ANTH 240 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 3.0 TBA
MW 0900-0950

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists, and how data from languages are used in related fields as evidence of cultural, social, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication.
Satisfies the non-western requirement.

ANTH 280 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 ARKUSH
TR 0930-1045

This course surveys the history and goals of archaeological research, different theoretical approaches to the study of ancient societies and culture change, and archaeological methods. Alongside the study of archaeological method and theory, we will explore life in the ancient and not-so-ancient worlds as revealed through the work of archaeologists.

ANTH 292 NEW WORLD CIVILIZATIONS: AZTEC, INCA AND MAYA 3.0 KOVACEVICH
MWF 0900-0950

This course will explore the rise and fall of New World civilizations in Mexico, Central America, and the Andes. Although the names Aztec, Inca and Maya are well known to the general public, very little is known about the cultures that preceded them. To understand these cultures and the nature of Pre-Hispanic civilization, one must have an understanding of the cultural trends that lead to their development. This diachronic approach will also allow us to demystify some of the more "exotic" cultural practices while underscoring their essential humanity, with relevant comparisons to our own and other societies. In the case of the Aztec of Mexico and the Inca of the Andes, these empires existed for a relatively short period of time before the encounter with the Spanish in the mid-sixteenth century. The Classic Period Maya civilization, in contrast, experienced a political and social "collapse" prior to the arrival of the Spanish and many cities were abandoned, although some of the culture was still thriving in certain regions in different forms at the time of contact. Each of these complex civilizations still have descendents who live in Central and South America today, and the legacies of these cultures will be discussed. We will reconstruct the social, political, and economic lives of these civilizations using a combination of archaeological, ethnohistoric, art historical, and ethnographic data. Films, activities, and images of material culture will supplement lectures, readings, and discussions.

ANTH 296 WITCHCRAFT AND CULTURES OF TERROR 3.0 NEWELL
MWF-10:00-10:50

This class considers the role of fear in social organization, cultural forms, and conflict. The witch represents evil within one's midst, disguised as a neighbor or even family member, driven by antisocial impulses. Taking the literature of witchcraft and the occult in societies around the world as our starting point, we examine questions of what witchcraft ideology represents, why it seems to be so captivating, and the effects of witchcraft beliefs on society. Why do so many people confess to witchcraft? Why is the symbolism of witchcraft (including flying, bodily transformations, and cannibalism) so consistent across cultures? Throughout the course we consider how these questions apply to analogous representations of otherness and fear such as deviance, warfare, terrorism, McCarthyism, Satanic Ritual Abuse, and anti-Semitism. We consider the techniques of eradication people resort to in the effort to free themselves from imagined and/or real internal evils, and ways in which witchcraft discourse functions metaphorically as an idiom for social conflicts both local and large scale.

ANTH 301 HISTORY & THEORY OF ANTHRO 4.0 MCKINNON
TR 1100-1215

This course will provide a survey of anthropological theory from the late 19th-century up to the present. We will explore a diverse range of anthropological approaches developed over the course of the century, including: 19th-century evolutionism, Boasian cultural anthropology, British structural-functionalism, French structuralism, British symbolic anthropology, American cultural materialism and neo-evolutionism, later American cultural anthropology, feminism, and post-colonial and post-modern theories. We will be concerned to understand these approaches not only as theoretical frameworks for understanding other cultures, but also as cultural and historical productions, in themselves. The discussion session is obligatory. This is a required course for anthropology majors.

ANTH 308 ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS 3.0 HANTMAN
R 1400-1630

This class is intended for upper-level archaeology students who have completed ANTH 280 (Introduction to Archaeology) or ANTH 381 (Field Methods) and are interested in doing further study in archaeological research design (relating questions to methods to data). We will critically examine current approaches to site survey and excavation. Topics to be included throughout the semester are sampling in archaeology, typology and classification, lithic analysis, ceramic analysis, ethnobotanical studies, bioarchaeological studies, and curation. Course requirements include the completion of an excavation and analysis simulation project early in the semester, a weekly lab analysis of artifact types with 1-2 page write-ups, and a final 10-15-page paper expanding on one of the research methods discussed in class.

ANTH 319 URBAN AFRICA AND POPULAR CULTURE 3.0 NEWELL
MW 1400-1515

In this course, we explore the cultural transformations and continuities produced by the emergence of African cities during and after colonialism. Tracing anthropological debates around African urban centers from the 1940s until the present, we will consider the efflorescence of new cultural forms of music, art, dress, and film in conjunction with new sources of identity such as slang, nationality, religion, ethnicity, consumption, and migration. Attention will be given to local efforts at attaining 'modernity' as well as perceived "loss of culture" and movements to preserve 'tradition'. Theoretical issues to be discussed: mimesis, modernity and 'hybrid' identities; urban social integration and the production of ethnicity; colonialism, class, and resistance; capitalism and economy; transformations in kinship, gender and sexuality.

ANTH 326 GLOBALIZATION & DEVELOPMENT 3.0 BASHKOW
TR 1530-1645

How does the globalization of economic markets affect people's lives? By readings in various disciplines including economics, history, sociology, and anthropology, this course offers an overview of global capitalism as a cultural phenomenon. Lectures and readings will examine economic phenomena in their cultural dimensions and social impact. Topics will include antecedents of globalization in western imperialism, the social nature of markets, the rise of neoliberalism, the politics of international lending, the "resource curse" and promotion of Third World corruption, the social implications of hidden (outsourced) production chains, the political and cultural roles of corporations and NGOs, and the ethnography of development projects and international aid. Coursework will consist of intensive reading and writing assignments, an ideas and reading journal, and a final take-home exam. Students may enroll in one of the optional discussion sections of 326D that will meet in the evenings to view and discuss films related to course themes.

ANTH 332 HEALING AND SHAMANISM 3.0 TURNER
TR 1100-1215

The course delves into the sources of shamanism and ritual healing. It provides some understanding of their different logics, and therefore why they communicate and heal. The class brings to life the reports and experiences of contemporary non-Western shamanic and healing rituals, keeping respect for native interpretations in order to better understand the effectiveness of ritual. We will give emphasis to the human, personal experience of the events as process, and will use the in-depth studies of scholars who have become more than scholars and participants, indeed practitioners of the crafts about which they seek knowledge. The experiencing of shamanism and healing being the actual life of these crafts, we will learn how to approximate a sense of the ritual by enacting it. A term paper is required, also a book presentation and short papers during the term.

ANTH 347 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST 3.0 LEFKOWITZ
MW 1400-1450

This course provides an introduction to the people, cultures, and histories of the Middle East, through an examination of language-use in contemporary Middle Eastern societies. The course focuses on Israel/Palestine, and the contact between Hebrew and Arabic, as a microcosm providing insight into important social processes-such as colonization, religious fundamentalism, modernization, and the changing status of women-affecting the region as a whole. Readings contrast ethnographic with novelistic representations of language, society, and identity. A primary concern will be to compare social scientific and literary constructions of self and other in the context of the political and military confrontation between Israel and Palestine. This is a lecture and discussion course. A number of feature films from the Middle East are incorporated into the course material. Requirements include four short essays and a book review. Prerequisite: previous course in anthropology, linguistics, or Middle Eastern studies, or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 348 LANGUAGE AND PREHISTORY 3.0 DANZIGER
WF 1000-1050

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics - the study of how languages change over time - and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the comparative-historical requirement for Linguistics majors.

ANTH 352 AMAZONIAN PEOPLES 3.0 MENTORE
TR 1530-1645

Native Lowland South American people have been portrayed as "animistic," "totemic," "shamanic," "mythologic," "Dreauduan," "slash and burn horticulturalists," "stateless," "gentle," "fierce," and much more. What do these anthropological portraits mean and what do they contribute to the collective body of Western intellectual thought? Is there any relation between such thinking and the experience of being "Indian" in Amazonian societies? Are there any other ways of understanding Amazonian social experiences? This course addresses these questions through a reading of the ethnography of the region. Satisfies College's Non-Western Perspectives Requirement.

ANTH 355 EVERYDAY LIFE IN AMERICA 4.0 DAMON
MWF 1100-1150

Taking a production and exchange orientation to society, this course uses anthropological models to analyze aspects of the US experience in North America and its extension into the world. The models will be drawn from the anthropological analysis of exchange, rites of transition, sacrifice and mythology. The course will be organized in two parts. The first will provide a journalistic introduction to United States culture focusing on its financial/productive center, political institutions, and national ideologies. Anthropological, i.e. analytical, models will be reviewed as part of this introduction. The second part will examine the place of war, athletics, and movies in US culture. The collective readings of this second part are to be used by each student as a point of departure for his or her own research project and paper. Several short thematic and response papers will organize the first part. A research paper anchors the second part. Students must enroll in a section of 355D. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 357 CARIBBEAN PERSPECTIVES 3.0 BONILLA
W 1500-1800

Description to be provided.

ANTH 363 CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION 3.0 SHEPHERD
TR 1230-1345

This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional Chinese forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety. The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered. Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in 20th- and 21st-century Chinese life. This course will satisfy the Second Writing Requirement. Meets College's Non-Western Perspective Requirements.

ANTH 370 ANTHROPOLOGY OF CONTEMPORARY INDIA 3.0 KHARE
W 1400-1630

The course discusses selected major socio-cultural, religious, political aspects of and issues in India since independence, with particular focus on the distinctly Indian fabrication of modernity for its fast spreading social position, cultural value and practical reach among contemporary Indians. This increasingly interpenetrating change will be studied against (a) India's current caste-family-kin-class social organization; (b) religions, gender issues and the Untouchables or Dalits; (c) caste alliances and Indian democratic politics; (d) Indian modernity in history and social practices; and (e) the Indian identity under globalization. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 372 ANTHROPOLOGY OF AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL ART 3.0 SMITH
MW 1400-1515

This class will study the intersection of anthropology, art and material culture focusing on Australian Aboriginal art. We will examine how Aboriginal art has moved from relative obscurity to global recognition over the past thirty years. Topics include the historical and cultural contexts of invention, production, marketing and appropriation of Aboriginal art. Students will conduct object-based research using the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection.

ANTH 383 NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 HANTMAN
MWF 1100-1150

This course provides an overview of the contributions of archaeological research to our understanding of the long term history of North America, particularly the history of indigenous Native American people. Following an introductory study of the diverse history of archaeological research in North American from the 18th century to the present, the course shifts focus to specific topics of interest. Among these are the debate over the timing and process of the initial peopling of the Americas, the development of distinctive regional traditions, discussions of the origins of domestication and regional exchange systems and the rise and fall of chiefdoms in prehistory, colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans, and the historical archaeology of Europeans and Africans in Colonial America.

ANTH 385 HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 NEIMAN
W 1630-1900

This course is an introduction to archaeological approaches to the study of the early modern Atlantic world (1500-1800). Our principal regional foci are Britain, West Africa, North America, and the Caribbean. Topics covered include subsistence and settlement systems, agricultural and ornamental landscapes, the arrangement and the use of architectural space on domestic sites, and commodity production and consumption. The course combines lectures, discussion sessions, and computer workshops. In the latter students have the opportunity to learn technical skills required to analyze effectively real archaeological data. The course aims to teach students in architectural history, art history, history, and archaeology new ways to use material evidence to chart important historical trends and to evaluate explanations for them.

ANTH 388 AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
MWF 1100-1150

This course surveys the archaeological knowledge currently available about the African continent. The emphasis will be on the Late Stone Age, when fully modern humans dominate the cultural landscape, and the subsequent Iron Age, but will also briefly cover pre-modern humans and the archaeology of the colonial period. The material includes the great social, economic, and cultural transformations in African history known primarily through archaeology, and the most important archaeological sites and discoveries on the continent. Throughout the course a theme will be the politics of the past, and the changing role of the practice of archaeology in Africa.

ANTH 395 GENDER AND ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 KOVACEVICH
MW 1530-1645

Anthropologists have found that there is great diversity in gender roles and identities through time and across cultures. Gender differences can be related to age and biological sex, but there is significant variation in the kinds of tasks, leadership roles, and ritual practices that different genders perform. This course will explore how and why archaeologists study the identities of men, women, and children, as well as the socially constructed ideologies that underlie these identities. We will read and discuss case studies from around the world, as well as topics such as biological sex vs. gender vs. sexuality, masculinity, motherhood, the sexual division of labor, and the limitations of a two sex/two gender approach (among others). We will use ethnographic and textual evidence as interpretive guides in exploring these topics, but will focus on the use of material culture to elucidate gender roles. Central questions of the course will include, how do we find these behaviors in the archaeological record, which are often only considered to be accessible through texts or direct observation of behavior? And, how can we use material culture, such as pottery, stone tools, figurines, bones, graves, and architecture to engender archaeology?

ANTH 401A SOCIAL INEQUALITIES: THE POSTCOLONIAL AND MODERN 3.0 KHARE
M 1400-1630

This is a seminar on anthropological discussion of social inequalities in the societies postcolonial and modern, with a comparative cultural focus on the inequalities in postcolonial India and the contemporary U.S. Beginning with (a) a comparative discussion of social inequalities in selected modern Western societies, the seminar will turn to (b) Indian caste, religious and gender inequalities; (c) anthropology of race; (d) American class-race-gender-ethnic differences; (e) Indian "casteism" and identity politics and American "race without racism"; and (f) inequalities in health care and globalization. The seminar will encourage students to research and write on innovative programs and activities (local, national or international) addressing inequalities to reduce human suffering. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 401B MARRIAGE IN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 3.0 SHEPHERD
TR 9:30-10:45

This seminar will look at the varieties of marriage found cross-culturally and historically. Includes examination of polygyny and polyandry, Goody's theory of the historical origins of the European marriage system, legal controversies over recognition of same sex marriages. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 401C THE SOCIAL LIFE OF GOODS AND MATERIALS 3.0 WATTENMAKER
W 1800-2030

Drawing on theoretical works in the social sciences, archaeological case studies, and ethnographies, this course examines the diverse ways that cultures have used materials and goods to create and transform their worlds. The course takes an inclusive view of material culture that considers settlements, houses, burials and shrines, as well as objects. We consider how the productive context, exchange and cultural uses of goods endow them with spiritual and social meanings. Topics include the use of goods in negotiating social relations, the circulation of goods, gifts and commodities, craft production as ritual, body adornment, gender and identity, and consumption and globalization. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 410 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 MARSHALL
TBA

The suffering body is inevitable in human experience, but the meaning of suffering is interpreted differently across cultures and time. Conceptions of the body, notions of health and methods of healing vary considerably. The point of this course, which introduces medical anthropology to undergraduates, is to contextualize bodies, suffering, health and power. The aim of the course is to provide a broad understanding of the relationship between culture (particularly in the U.S.), healing (especially the Western form of healing known as biomedicine), health and political power.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 504 LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS 3.0 SANCHEZ
T 1530-1800

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include one paper on phonology, one on morphology, and one on syntax (the nature of the assignment may vary depending on the particular language being studied).

ANTH 529A CULTURAL STUDIES OF SCIENCE 3.0 MCKINNON
W 1530-1800

This course explores the culture of science and science as a cultural production. It asks how the conventions of science were brought into being in a particular historical and cultural context, and how these conventions are challenged in and by different national contexts and transnational movements. It asks what social hierarchies shape who gets to do science, and how science contributes to the creation and maintenance (or the dismantling) of social hierarchies. It asks how different cultural understandings delimit the questions that can and cannot be asked, the way "facts" are produced, and what "objectivity" might be about. Along the way, it delves into the fascinating ethnographies of a diverse set of scientific topics--from slime mold to high-energy physics, from epidemiology to artificial life, from primatology to biogenetics. This is a graduate course, but it is open to interested upper-level undergraduates, by permission of the instructor. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 529B ANIMALS AS OTHER 3.0 METCALF
MW 1400-1515

This course explores Claude Lévi-Strauss' maxim that "animals are good to think." It asks how people in different times and places have understood what animals are, and how they participate in the same world as we inhabit. It explores the proposition that religions are not about the supernatural after all, but the natural. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 529C ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION: SELECTED TOPICS 3.0 SIHLÉ
M 1530-1800

This seminar will provide an overview of a selection of key theoretical formulations and discussions in the anthropology of religion. The ethnographic readings will range across a wide diversity of contexts, with a slight emphasis on Asia. Prospective students are encouraged to contact the instructor in advance and to discuss their interests with him.
Course fulfils second writing requirement.
 

ANTH 542 THEORIES OF LANGUAGE 3.0 CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 1530-1645

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; weekly reading responses, a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course.
 

ANTH 549A MULTILINGUALISM AND LANGUAGE CONTACT 3.0 SANCHEZ
TR 0930-1045

In the generative tradition, the model of an ideal monolingual speaker is often assumed. However, most of the world’s citizens experience language as bi- or multilingual individuals, and many of these live in multilingual communities. This course considers what happens to language at both the individual and community levels in circumstances of multilingualism and language contact. We will examine different types of contact, and their specific structural effects on each level of language, from phonetics to discourse-pragmatics. General topics will include pidiginization, creolization, language transfer, borrowing (lexical and structural), diglossia, codeswitching, and the speech community (e.g. How does one define a ‘multilingual speech community’, if such a thing is even possible?).

ANTH 549B MIND AND LANGUAGE 3.0 DANZIGER
R 1400-1630

Anthropologists report that across societies, different cultural attitudes exist as to the acceptability of speculating on what is taking place in another person's mind. In certain cultural settings, speculation of this kind is considered completely inappropriate: something to be politely avoided. Meanwhile however, linguistic theories about how conversation works rely heavily on the premise that in order to function successfully, conversational interactants must constantly seek out and interpret the unstated intentions of their conversation partners. How can we reconcile the linguistic account with the anthropological observations? This seminar course covers the relevant literature from ethno-psychology and linguistic pragmatics, and considers the relationship of cultural philosophies of language, including our own, to the actual conduct of interaction. Because figurative language forms (e.g., metaphor, irony) seem especially to require intention-guessing for their interpretation, the course includes significant consideration of the role and range of such forms in different cultural contexts.

ANTH 577 CULTURAL INVENTORIES 3.0 WAGNER
TR 1230-1345

This class uses the work of Jorge Luis Borges and Ludwig Wittgenstein to explore the "inventory" side of the language-phenomenon, the quixotic logic or order of experience that is manifest in what is said, or meant, or intended in the use of language, rather than in its syntax, grammar, or basic structure. The logic of "what to say." Readings and discussion in seminar; course paper.
 

ANTH 587 ARCHAEOLOZOOLOGY 3.0 WATTENMAKER
T 1530-1800

This laboratory course provides students with the background and skills needed to analyze animal bones from archaeological sites. Emphasize will be placed on the potential of faunal analysis for contributing to anthropological issues, such as the domestication of animals, political economy, state formation and the organizational dynamics of urban economies, and the construction of ritual systems. Lectures will include a critical survey of the methodological approaches and techniques to address anthropological questions through the analysis of animal bones. Topics such as research design, strategies of field collection of animal bones, and data analysis and interpretation will be covered. In the laboratory, students will learn to identify fauna remains to species, determine age and sex of species, distinguish between wild and domestic animals, recognize bone pathologies, and observe cultural modification of bones. This course is intended for undergraduate anthropology or archaeology majors, undergraduate students in related fields, and graduate students with a specialization in archaeology.

ANTH 592 ARCHAEOLOGY OF COLONIAL EXPANSION 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
W 1400-1630

This seminar explores the archaeology of colonialism by placing European expansions against a backdrop of other archaeologically-known examples. The course is in three sections. We begin by examining a selection of the literature that shaped the way we talk about colonialism in anthropology today, and will in each case discuss the relationship and relevance of that literature to archaeological research. The middle weeks focus on how thematic issues at the center of colonialism studies have been tackled archaeologically (and sometimes historically, or in other complementary disciplines). And the last segment of the course focuses on case studies that I hope will be of broad interest to the class, concluding with presentations of research paper topics. The core of the class will be critical readings of case studies, contextualized against the changing theoretical landscape of colonialism studies. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 701 HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY 3.0 DAMON
M 1900-2130

This required course for first year graduate students explores the diverse intellectual roots of Anthropology from the 18th to the mid 20th Century. We attempt to keep clear the differences and interweavings amongst US, English and French traditions that lay the ground work for late 20th and early 21st century Anthropology.

ANTH 703 ETHNOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS 3.0 BASHKOW
W 1600-1830

In this third semester of the Anthropology graduate core sequence, we will read and discuss a series of monographs to study the creation and presentation of ethnographic analyses and arguments. Course is restricted to Anthropology graduate students in their third semester.

ANTH 708 ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHOD & THEORY 3.0 ARKUSH
T 1400-1630

An intensive investigation of theory and method in anthropological archaeology, with particular attention paid to the evolution of archaeological theory in the last fifty years, and to the diversity of modern approaches in archaeology.

 

ANTH 729 NATIONALISM & POLITICS OF CULTURE 3.0 HANDLER
MW 1400-1515

This course surveys theories of nationalism in relationship to theories of culture, and then looks at culture-building and history-making processes as these reflect nationalist politics. The course also considers racial and ethnic identity and cultural authenticity.

 

ANTH 738 SOC PROD HEALTH & DISEASE 3.0 MARSHALL
T 1400-1630

Co-taught by Norm Oliver, M.D. (UVa Health Systems-Family Medicine) and Wende Marshall, the course will explore health and disease in socio-cultural, political-economic, and historic contexts. We will pay particular attention to the current popular discourse on "minority health disparities," exploring its conceptual meaning, and its limits for understanding the relationship between race, poverty, health and disease. Readings are interdisciplinary and will range across anthropology, epidemiology and public health, history of science, and sociology among others. The course is appropriate for graduate students in the social sciences and humanities, as well as in the health sciences.

ANTH 747 LANGAUGE AND CULUTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST 3.0 LEFKOWITZ
MW 1400-1450

This course provides an introduction to the people, cultures, and histories of the Middle East, through an examination of language-use in contemporary Middle Eastern societies. The course focuses on Israel/Palestine, and the contact between Hebrew and Arabic, as a microcosm providing insight into important social processes-such as colonization, religious fundamentalism, modernization, and the changing status of women-affecting the region as a whole. Readings contrast ethnographic with novelistic representations of language, society, and identity. A primary concern will be to compare social scientific and literary constructions of self and other in the context of the political and military confrontation between Israel and Palestine. This is a lecture and discussion course. A number of feature films from the Middle East are incorporated into the course material. Requirements include four short essays and a book review. Prerequisite: previous course in anthropology, linguistics, or Middle Eastern studies, or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 772 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AFRICAN ETHNOGRAPHY 3.0 NEWELL
R 1530-1800

This course surveys the greatest hits of African ethnography, from early classics of British social anthropology and symbolic anthropology to current works reshaping contemporary debates. The focus of the class will be critical readings of full scale monographs, evaluating them in terms of methods, questions of representation, and theoretical significance. While readings will be adapted to interests and needs of the students, themes of particular importance in the class will be colonialism and postcolonial identity, modernity and social imagination, globalization, witchcraft and ritual, corruption and the state, consumption, urban space and culture, emergent ethnicities, sex and gender. A principal goal of this course will be to advance students' professional expertise in the anthropology of Africa.

ANTH 785 HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 NEIMAN
W 1630-1900

This course is an introduction to archaeological approaches to the study of the early modern Atlantic world (1500-1800). Our principal regional foci are Britain, West Africa, North America, and the Caribbean. Topics covered include subsistence and settlement systems, agricultural and ornamental landscapes, the arrangement and the use of architectural space on domestic sites, and commodity production and consumption. The course combines lectures, discussion sessions, and computer workshops. In the latter students have the opportunity to learn technical skills required to analyze effectively real archaeological data. The course aims to teach students in architectural history, art history, history, and archaeology new ways to use material evidence to chart important historical trends and to evaluate explanations for them.