1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Fall 2009

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics
2190,2230,2320,3320,
5528,5529-2
2156,2559-1,2660,3152,3150,
3155,3157,3559,3630,3680,
3700,5529-1
2559-3, 2559-4, 2559-5,
2800,3850,3870, 3880,5589, 5840,5880
2400,2559-2,3410,
3450,3470,5410,5420,

Major Requirements
3010
Non-Western perspectives for the majors
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern equirement)
1010,2156,2660,3152,3157,3470,3559, 3630,3680,3700,5529-1
Senior Seminars
4991-1,4991-2,4991-3, 4991-4

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 1010 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DOUGLASS
TR 9:30-10:45

This course introduces the student to some general topics of interest in cultural anthropology. Through readings, films, lectures and discussions student should come to an understanding of the extent of human diversity. We explore what anthropologists mean by "culture" and the methodology most associated with cultural anthropology, fieldwork. A number of societies from around the world provide examples of different practices regarding the meaning of "progress," language and belief, patterns of family relations, the social construction of identity, and the question of "race." We look at other cultures to develop an appreciation of cultural diversity and cultural relativism. However, the anthropological method is comparative, and the aim of anthropology is always to know our own culture better. Satisfies College's Non-Western Perspective Requirement.

ANTH 2156 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF AFRICA 3.0 HICKEL
MWF 10:00 -10:50

This course will review great themes in Africanist anthropology as part of a broader introduction to the history and politics of the continent. Students will explore the general contours of European colonialism beginning in the 19th century, the wave of national liberation movements that swept through the 20th, and the position of African states in today's global economic order. Against this backdrop, we will focus on specific areas of interest - such as Sudan, Rwanda, and South Africa - through classic and contemporary ethnographic texts that have helped define the discipline. This approach will expose students to crucial trends in anthropological theory - including Structuralism, Marxism, and Relativism - and provide basic tools with which to think critically through these frameworks. No prior coursework in anthropology required.

ANTH 2190 DESIRE AND WORLD ECONOMY 3.0 MENTORE
T R 11:00-12:15

This course offers an insight into the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services practiced by peoples ignored or unknown to classic Western economics. Its principle focus will open upon the obvious differences between cultural concepts of the self and the very notion of its desire. Such arguments as those which theorize on the "rationality" of the market and the "naturalness" of competition will be debunked.

ANTH 2230 FANTASY AND SOCIAL VALUES 3.0 WAGNER
TR 9:30-10:45

An examination of imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Attention is given to "alternate cultures" and fictional societal models. A "cultural imaginary" allows us to think carefully about implications of gender, technology, and social existence that we, for very good reasons, are not allowed to experiment upon. Three papers, mandatory attendance in lecture.

ANTH 2320 ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION 3.0 METCALF
MW 11:00-11:50

Explores anthropological approaches to religion, in the context of this discipline's century-old project to understand people's conception of the world in which they live.

ANTH 2400 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 3.0 HARR
TR:12:45-1:45

Description forthcoming.

ANTH 2559-1 TOPICS IN ETHNOGRAPHY/ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY EUROPE 3.0 DOUGLASS
TR 12:30-1:45

This introductory course will turn the anthropological lens on the ethnographical study of contemporary Europe. How do cultural anthropologists explore the variety of identities and cultural forms found in the diverse regional, historical and social contexts of the "new Europe"? A major theme throughout the course is how people construct and negotiate their identities in post-modernity. Issues covered include the resurgence of old nationalisms, the place of ethnic minorities, the European Union and the construct of a pan-European identity, immigration and transnationalism, reconfiguration of gender roles, the changing family structure and the "baby bust," youth culture, rural and urban differences, the resurgence of religiosity, and contemporary cultural performances. We look at the Roma ("Gypsy") in postsocialist Eastern Europe, honor killings in the Netherlands, firewalking in Greece, bullfights in Spain, African migrants in Italy, motherhood in Greece and one-child families in Russia.

ANTH 2559-2 SENIOR SEMINAR: THE WORLD AT PLAY 3.0 MENAIR
TR 9:30-10:45

This course will explore imaginative play by people around the world and consider its social and cultural uses. In material ranging from Balinese cockfights to Charlie Chaplin films we will examine the relevance of joking, parody, and other acts of creative improvisation to people's lives and worldviews. Far from being inconsequential, acts of fun will be revealed as particularly ideologically laden through sociolinguistic and semiotic analysis. Students will have a choice of major assignments, weekly response papers or a term paper. This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

ANTH 2559-3 EXPLORING ANCIENT SOCIAL WORLDS 3.0 MARSHALL
MW 2:00-3:15

This course centers on the archaeology of social relations and organization. We will explore how archaeology can illuminate past social interactions at household, community, and regional levels using examples from prehistoric and historic societies in various parts of the world. The class will consider the value of established models of social complexity (such as band, chiefdom, and state) and survey more recent innovations in the study of social organization. Students will also examine how archaeological research can reveal how individuals are socialized and how they relate to larger group dynamics in terms of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and rank.

ANTH 2559-4 ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY IN THE ANCIENT PAST 3.0 PAWLOWITZ
TR 2:00-3:15

Humans have deep and complex relationships with their environments, changing and manipulating those environments even as they help shape human societies. Recent awareness of the importance of this relationship has prompted study of the environmental impacts of particular human activities and the sustainability of certain practices. Archaeology has the capacity to extend such analysis of humans' interactions with their environments into the ancient past and to provide case studies for the long term effects of particular modes of interaction. This course will thus explore the variety of ways in which archaeologists examine the relationship between humans and the environment and the sorts of effects that different environmental conditions and changes have had on ancient societies.

No prior coursework in archaeology required.

ANTH 2559-5 ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANCIENT ASIA 3.0 MCCARTY
TR 11:00-12:15

This course is a survey focusing on a variety of ancient cultures and time periods that spanned the geographic expanse of Asia. We follow the course later covered by the legendary Silk Road, a series of land and sea routes along which merchandise, ideas, and people moved; it connected Japan at its eastern edge with the Mediterranean in the west. Topics include the archaeology of Jomon period Japan, Shang China, the Indus River Valley Harappan civilization of today's India and Pakistan, Bronze Age Central Asia including Afghanistan and cultures of Anatolia (modern Turkey) including the Hittite Empire. Theoretical themes include changes during the Neolithic period across this area (such as plant and animal domestication and the development of pottery), state formation and the archaeological detection of trade and exchange (including nautical archaeology).

ANTH 2660 PEOPLES OF POLYNESIA 3.0 SIIKALA
MWF 11:00-11:50

This course provides an introduction to the ethnography of Polynesia. The Polynesian people inhabit island groups scattered throughout a vast triangular area in the Central and South Pacific, which spans from New Zealand to Easter Island and Hawai'i. Descendants of Austronesian people originating from the island Southeast Asia, Polynesians share a remarkable cultural and linguistic unity despite the seeming isolation of their island homes. Early anthropologists saw the region as a kind of natural laboratory for controlled study of cultural and linguistic evolution. However, the tremendous mobility and the complex migration patterns of the people meant that Polynesian traditional cultures were never static, and since the 18th century the region has been profoundly affected by the arrival of Christianity, Western colonial powers, and the pressures of the global economic system. This course will deal with the prehistory of the region (maritime migrations, indigenous social structure, religion, and exchange) as well as the changes brought about by Western influence and more contemporary forces affecting the lives of islanders.

ANTH 2800 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
MW 2:00-2:50

This course introduces the history and goals of archaeological research, different theoretical approaches to the study of ancient societies and culture change, and archaeological methods. Alongside this study of archaeological method and theory, we will explore case studies of life in the ancient and not-so-ancient past worldwide as revealed through the work of archaeologists. The class structure is lectures on Monday and Wednesday, and an additional mandatory discussion section.

ANTH 3010 THEORY AND HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY 4.0 SIHLÉ
TR 12:30 - 1:45

This course is designed for students who are majoring in anthropology. It presents a broad historical outline of major theoretical approaches in the field, from the late 19th century to the present. These approaches will be examined in relation to both evolving debates within the discipline, and the larger historical, cultural and intellectual contexts in which they were produced, and which they to some degree reflect; we will also discuss the enduring relevance of these theories. The course stresses close reading of primary texts and emphasizes in particular the critical analysis of these texts’ arguments. The discussion section is obligatory. This is a required course for anthropology majors.

ANTH 3150 READING IN ETHNOGRAPHY 3.0 METCALF
MW 3:30-4:45

A comparative reading and discussion of selected ethnographies,, classical, old and new, illustrating different styles and purposes of ethnographic writing, interpretation and analysis. Class discussions will explicate both the "science" and "art" of field work and ethnography, along with a focus on employing ethnography to study such diverse issues as gender; birth, disease and dying; food and culture; eating disorders; and social communication.

ANTH 3152 AMAZONIAN PEOPLE 4.0 MENTORE
TR 3:30-4:45

Native Lowland South American people have been portrayed as "animistic," "totemic," "shamanic," "mythologic," "Dreauduan," "slash and burn horticulturalists," "stateless," "gentle," "fierce," and much more. What do these anthropological portraits mean and what do they contribute to the collective body of Western intellectual thought? Is there any relation between such thinking and the experience of being "Indian" in Amazonian societies? Are there any other ways of understanding Amazonian social experiences? This course addresses these questions through a reading of the ethnography of the region. Satisfies College's Non-Western Perspectives Requirement.

ANTH 3155 EVERYDAY LIFE IN AMERICA 4.0 DAMON
MWF 10:00-10:50

Taking a production and exchange orientation to society, this course uses anthropological models to analyze aspects of the US experience in North America and its extension into the world. The models will be drawn from the anthropological analysis of exchange, rites of transition, sacrifice and mythology. The course will be organized in two parts. The first will provide a journalistic introduction to United States culture focusing on its financial/productive center, political institutions, and national ideologies. Anthropological, i.e. analytical, models will be reviewed as part of this introduction. The second part will examine the place of war, athletics, and movies in US culture. The collective readings of this second part are to be used by each student as a point of departure for his or her own research project and paper. Several short thematic and response papers will organize the first part. A research paper anchors the second part. Students must enroll in a section of 355D. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement. Anthropology majors or those in allied disciplines (e.g. History, American Studies)

ANTH 3157 CARIBBEAN PERSPECTIVES 3.0 BONILLA
W 3:30-6:00

Breaking with popular constructions of the region as a timeless tropical paradise, this course will re-define the Caribbean as the birthplace of modern forms of capitalism, globalization, and trans-nationalism. We will survey the founding moments of Caribbean history, including the imposition of slavery, the rise of plantation economies, and the development of global networks of goods and peoples. We will then examine the various forms of colonial and imperial power that have operated in the region during the latter part of the twentieth century and the lasting legacies of inequality and hierarchy that persist in contemporary Caribbean societies. Lastly, we will revisit the idea of the Caribbean as a tourist heaven and question popular images of the region as a site of tropical fantasy.

ANTH 3320 HEALING, SHAMANISM, AND THE SOURCE OF RITUAL 3.0 TURNER
TR 2:00-3:15

Ritual provides the characteristic approach of anthropology to the comparative study of religion, and the analysis of ritual is anthropology's major contribution to that project. Everywhere ritual permeates social life, yet in no other category of behavior is the exoticness of other cultures more striking. Consequently ritual presents a special challenge to anthropology. This course asks common-sense questions about what rituals mean, and show how far we have come to answering them in a century of theorizing.

ANTH 3450 NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGES 3.0 DANZIGER
TR 9:30-10:45

This course in an introduction to the native languages of the Americas and to the methods that linguists and anthropologists have used to record and analyze them. It covers linguistic analysis and theory as a way into knowledge of languages very different from English and the frequently studied European languages. The methods of analysis learned should enable students to make intelligent use of linguistic materials on languages in other parts of the world as well. The native languages of the Americas are many, diverse and unevenly studied. Generalizations about them all can rarely be very meaningful or penetrating. The best way to gain a genuine sense of the subject is to become familiar with one of the languages . Such familiarity will give more than acquaintance with that particular language. It will give insight into the nature of the data and problems of the field as a whole (i.e. the field of study of languages which have been, for their speakers, unwritten.) To achieve this purpose, the course is designed so that each student will be working on a different language for which adequate published materials are available. The major assignments involve that work. Pre-requisite: LNGS 325 (3250). This course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors.

ANTH 3470 LANGUAGE CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST 3.0 LEFKOWITZ
MW 2:00-2:50

This course provides an introduction to the people, cultures, and histories of the Middle East, through an examination of language-use in contemporary Middle Eastern societies. The course focuses on Israel/Palestine, and the contact between Hebrew and Arabic, as a microcosm providing insight into important social processes-such as colonization, religious fundamentalism, modernization, and the changing status of women-affecting the region as a whole. Readings contrast ethnographic with novelistic representations of language, society, and identity. A primary concern will be to compare social scientific and literary constructions of self and other in the context of the political and military confrontation between Israel and Palestine. This is a lecture and discussion course. A number of feature films from the Middle East are incorporated into the course material. Requirements include four short essays and a book review. Prerequisite: previous course in anthropology, linguistics, or Middle Eastern studies; or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 3559 TRANSNATIONAL EAST ASIA: CHINA AND KOREA 3.0 FREEMAN
TR 12:30-1:45

This course asks in what ways have border crossing-activities and mobility within circuits of global capitalism altered the way life is lived and imagined both at home and in Korean and Chinese communities overseas? Seeking new understandings of the way power works in a transnational milieu, we will explore the challenges that mobility poses to concepts of ethnic/national identity, citizenship, gender and family formation.

ANTH 3630 CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION 3.0 SHEPHERD
TR 12:30-1:45

This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional Chinese forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety. The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered. Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in 20th- and 21st-centuryChinese life.
This course will satisfy the Second Writing Requirement. Meets College's Non-Western Perspective Requirements.

ANTH 3680 ANTHROPOLOGY OF AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL ART 3.0 SMITH
TR 9:30-10:45

This class will study the intersection of anthropology, art and material culture focusing on Australian Aboriginal art. We will examine how Aboriginal art has moved from relative obscurity to global recognition over the past thirty years. Topics include the historical and cultural contexts of invention, production, marketing and appropriation of Aboriginal art. Students will conduct research using the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection and Study Center.

ANTH 3700 ANTHROPOLOGY OF CONTEMPORARY INDIA 3.0 KHARE
W 2:00-4:30

An anthropological discussion of selected changing aspects of and issues in India since independence, with a focus on interdependently transforming Indian modernity and traditions in the (a) family, kinship, caste, community organizations; (b) the Indian middle-class, in rural India and in "slum" India; (c) caste politics and Indian democracy; (d) selected major religious conflicts and identities; and (e) popular TV and cinema culture.

ANTH 3850 HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 NEIMAN
W 4:30-7:00

Historical archaeology is the archaeological study of the continental and transoceanic human migrations that began in the fifteenth century, their effects on native peoples, and historical trajectories of the societies that they created. This course offers an introduction to the field. It emphasizes how theoretical models, analytical methods, and archaeological data can be combined to make and evlaluate credible inferences about the cultural dynamics of the past. The class combines lecture and discussion with computer workshops, in which students have a chance to explore historical issues raised in the reading and lectures. Our principle historical focus this semester is change in the conflicting economic and social strategies pursued by Europeans, Africans, and Native-Americans, and their descendents in the 17th-century and 18th-century Chesapeake. The course is designed to teach students in architectural history, history, and archaeology how to use theoretical models, simple statistical methods, and software applications, including spreadsheets, databases, and GIS, to address important historical questions.

ANTH 3870 ARCHAEOLOGY OF VIRGINIA 3.0 HANTMAN
TR 2:00-3:15

This course examines the insights gained into Virginia's history and prehistory through the joining of archaeological and ethnohistoric research. The course explores culture change and adaptation in Virginia (and the Chesapeake region more broadly) from the time of earliest human settlement in the region to the nineteenth century. In this vast time frame, we will focus on a number of selected topics for which people, events, and sites in Virginia provide a unique perspective. These include: debate surrounding the timing and process of the initial settlement of the Americas, the adoption of domesticates, the development of distinct regional polities such as the Powhatan and Monacan, early interaction between American Indians and Europeans and the impacts of colonialism, and archaeological research on Euroamerican and African-American cultures in the region.

ANTH 3880 AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
MWF 11:00-11:50

This course provides a survey of the archaeological knowledge currently available about the African continent, with particular emphasis on the Late Stone Age, when fully modern humans dominate the cultural landscape, up to the archaeology of the modern colonial period. The material includes the great social, economic, and cultural transformations in African history known primarily through archaeology, and the most important archaeological sites and discoveries on the continent. Throughout the course a theme will be the politics of the past, and the changing role of the practice of archaeology in Africa.

ANTH 4991-1 SENIOR SEMINAR: SOCIAL INEQUALITIES IN THE MODERN WORLD 3.0 KHARE
M 2:00-4:30

Description forthcoming.

ANTH 4991-2 SENIOR SEMINAR: TECHNOLOGY, CULTURE AND TIME 3.0 DAMON
MW 4:00-5:15

The last twenty or more years have witnessed an outpouring in anthropological literature taking seriously the proposition that motivated cultural forms are determinants of technological orders and that cultures themselves are a kind of technology, knowledge of and for the world. This course will convene a selective reading of this new work . A specific focus in this inquiry will concern the internal or external organization of time embedded, or not embedded, in particular technological configurations. Time is a critical component in Western technologies with their bubble-like orientations: Is this true elsewhere? The course has a two-fold orientation, on the one hand affording the class a review of this intellectual thrust; on the other providing each student the occasion for his or her own specific inquiry into the relationship between a culture and some significant aspect of its technology. The course will be organized around short response papers to the collective readings and a term/research paper. This course will meet the second writing requirement.

ANTH 4991-3 PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGIES 3.0 HANTMAN
M 3:30-6:00

This seminar addresses the multi-faceted issues that arise when archaeological research of diverse pasts is presented to modern public audiences in North America. Legal and ethical issues in the management, study and public presentation of archaeological research in North America are reviewed, with a particular focus on indigenous concerns. The class will review case studies and current literature in the field.

ANTH 4991-4 SENIOR SEMINAR: MOBILITY & CONNECTIONS ACROSS THE BRITISH EMPIRE IN SOUTH ASIA 3.0 RATANAPRUCK
R 6:00-8:30 PM

The creation of an empire is a trans-cultural and trans-regional phenomenon of a very large scale. As a state becomes mobile in its overseas expansion, its people, ideas, capital, legal system and cultural practices also move. The process of conquest and the maintenance of an empire also create conditions for many categories of people to move-colonial administrators, mercenary soldiers, private traders, business entrepreneurs, indentured labor. As a new sovereignty is formed, cutting across preexisting cultural and political boundaries, exchanges and connections across the new empire also develop, while long-standing ties endure or reconfigure themselves. In this course, we will explore these effects of the British Empire on South Asian societies, through historical and ethnographic writings as well as works of fiction, particularly by Amitav Ghosh.

Since the British Empire extended beyond South Asia, these phenomena are also laboratories for exploring the relationships between South Asia and other parts of the world that were brought into contact with one another during the British Empire. Towards the end of the course, we will explore how the ending of an empire, and the making of independent nation-states impacted connections and social relations that were formed as a result of movements during the British Empire. How, for example, does the formation of new states generate problems of ethnic conflicts and refugees in many parts of the world?

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 5410 PHONOLOGY 3.0 DOBRIN
T 2:00-4:30

An introduction to the theory and analysis of linguistic sound systems. Covers the essential units of speech sound that lexical and grammatical elements are composed of, how those units are organized at multiple levels of representation, and the principles governing the relation between levels.

ANTH 5420 THEORIES OF LANGUAGE 3.0 CONTINI-MORAVA
TR 12:30-1:45

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; weekly reading responses, a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course.

ANTH 5528 TOPICS IN RACE THEORY: RACE 3.0 MARSHALL
M 6:30-9:00 PM

The 2008 Election will explore the role of race, class and gender in the 2008 presidential election. We will pay particular attention to the media constructs of "the white working class," and of the "first African American and woman" to viably run for the office of the presidency.We will also attend to the media unmentionable of white supremacy.

ANTH 5529-1 TIBETAN RELIGION 3.0 SIHLÉ
M 3:30-6:00

This seminar approaches a complex, major religious tradition, Tibetan Buddhism in its larger sociocultural contexts, from an analytical, anthropological perspective. Through ethnographies, a selection of comparative and theoretical elements, and film, we will analyze the diverse array of Tibetan religious forms, from mass and elite monasticism to spirit-mediums, from the complexities of Tantric ritual to conceptions of the cosmos and the person. Through this focus on Tibetan religion, we will address larger anthropological issues and debates on religion and society (e.g., issues pertaining to Buddhism and modernity), religion and politics, ritual (central here to an unusual degree in Buddhist traditions and, as such, a major emphasis in this course), and the anthropology of texts. Course meets Second Writing Requirement.
 

ANTH 5529-2 CULTURAL INVENTORIES 3.0 WAGNER
TR 12:30-1:45

This class uses the work of Jorge Luis Borges and Ludwig Wittgenstein to explore the "inventory" side of the language-phenomenon, the quixotic logic or order of experience that is manifest in what is said, or meant, or intended in the use of language, rather than in its syntax, grammar, or basic structure. The logic of "what to say." Readings and discussion in seminar; course paper.

ANTH 5549 MIND IN LANGUAGE 3.0 DANZIGER
R 2:00-4:30

Anthropologists report that across societies, different cultural attitudes exist as to the acceptability of speculating on what is taking place in another person's mind. In certain cultural settings, speculation of this kind is considered completely inappropriate: something to be politely avoided. Meanwhile however, linguistic theories about how conversation works rely heavily on the premise that in order to function successfully, conversational interactants must constantly seek out and interpret the unstated intentions of their conversation partners. How can we reconcile the linguistic account with the anthropological observations? This seminar course covers the relevant literature from ethno-psychology and linguistic pragmatics, and considers the relationship of cultural philosophies of language, including our own, to the actual conduct of interaction. Because figurative language forms (e.g., metaphor, irony) seem especially to require intention-guessing for their interpretation, the course includes significant consideration of the role and range of such forms in different cultural contexts.

ANTH 5840 ARCHAEOLOGY OF COMPLEX SOCIEITIES 3.0 WATTENMAKER
T 3:30-6:00

This seminar course examines key themes, theories and controversies of interest to archaeologists researching complex societies. We will first examine theoretical approaches to ranked or "middle scale" societies and, with this background, will then consider state societies and empires. Readings will include problem-oriented case studies dealing with a range of relevant topics, such as archaeological signatures of state societies, political economy, gender, class and other sources of variation in state societies, and inter-cultural dynamics. Drawing on these case studies, we will address the questions of how social hierarchies and inequalities are constructed, maintained and undermined in archaeologically documented complex societies.

ANTH 5880 ANALYTICAL METHODS 3.0 MOST
F 9:30-12:00

This course provides an introduction to the use of analytical procedures, database applications, statistics, and quantitative methods in archaeology and anthropology. Analytical techniques used to generate, describe, and analyze archaeological and anthropological data sets are emphasized but experience has shown that students in sociology, psychology, and nursing have little problem applying the statistical methods learned to their own data sets. The course focuses on research design, database construction, hypothesis testing, probability and sampling, and univariate statistics. No prior knowledge of statistics is necessary; background in anthropology, archaeology, or a related field is required.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 7010 HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY 3.0 WESTON
W 3:00-5:30

This required course for first year graduate students explores the diverse intellectual roots of Anthropology from the 18th to the mid 20th Century. We attempt to keep clear the differences and interweavings amongst US, English and French traditions that lay the ground work for late 20th and early 21st century Anthropology.

ANTH 7030 EHNOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS 3.0 BASHKOW
W 3:00-5:30

In this third semester of the Anthropology graduate core sequence, we will read and discuss a series of monographs to study the creation and presentation of ethnographic analyses and arguments. Course is restricted to Anthropology graduate students in their third semester.

ANTH 7060 GRANT WRITING 3.0 MCKINNON
TBA

A workshop for graduate students on how to write solid dissertation proposals and winning applications for research grants. We will examine model proposals and discuss application strategies, selection criteria, and the process by which applications are evaluated. Each student will prepare a draft proposal and take it through several revisions that will be discussed by the group.

ANTH 7450 NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGE 3.0 DANZIGER
TR 9:30-10:45

This course in an introduction to the native languages of the Americas and to the methods that linguists and anthropologists have used to record and analyze them. It covers linguistic analysis and theory as a way into knowledge of languages very different from English and the frequently studied European languages. The methods of analysis learned should enable students to make intelligent use of linguistic materials on languages in other parts of the world as well. The native languages of the Americas are many, diverse and unevenly studied. Generalizations about them all can rarely be very meaningful or penetrating. The best way to gain a genuine sense of the subject is to become familiar with one of the languages. Such familiarity will give more than acquaintance with that particular language. It will give insight into the nature of the data and problems of the field as a whole (i.e. the field of study of languages which have been, for their speakers, unwritten.) To achieve this purpose, the course is designed so that each student will be working on a different language for which adequate published materials are available. The major assignments involve that work. Pre-requisite: LNGS 325 (3250) , LNGS 701 (7010) or ANTH 740 (7400). This course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and for Linguistics graduate students

ANTH 7470 LANGUAGE & CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST 3.0 LEFKOWITZ
MW 2:00-2:50

This course provides an introduction to the people, cultures, and histories of the Middle East, through an examination of language-use in contemporary Middle Eastern societies. The course focuses on Israel/Palestine, and the contact between Hebrew and Arabic, as a microcosm providing insight into important social processes-such as colonization, religious fundamentalism, modernization, and the changing status of women-affecting the region as a whole. Readings contrast ethnographic with novelistic representations of language, society, and identity. A primary concern will be to compare social scientific and literary constructions of self and other in the context of the political and military confrontation between Israel and Palestine. This is a lecture and discussion course. A number of feature films from the Middle East are incorporated into the course material. Requirements include four short essays and a book review. Prerequisite: previous course in anthropology, linguistics, or Middle Eastern studies; or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 7541 SOCIOLINGUSTICS 3.0 CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 11:00-11:50

Sociolinguistics is the study of the way language is used to express social relationships. Topics to be covered include language as an index of socio-economic class. Black English, male-female language, pidgin and Creole languages, the analysis of everyday conversation, and political, legal, and social issues affecting language use in multilingual societies, including ours. Midterm and final; field project involving observation of language use in the speech community.

ANTH 7559 EMPIRE AND SOVEREIGNITY 3.0 BONILLA
T 3:30-6:00

This graduate seminar will provide students with a foundation in both classic and contemporary theories of colonialism, postcolonialism, empire, and sovereignty. We will examine anthropological approaches to the workings of colonialism and empire, the nature of postcolonial identity formation, and the contemporary challenges to self determination and governance in the Postcolony.

ANTH 7630 CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGION 3.0 SHEPHERD
TR 12:30-1:45

This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional Chinese forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety. The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered. Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in 20th- and 21st-century Chinese life.

ANTH 7700 SOCIAL PRODUCTION OF HEALTH DISEASE 3.0 MARSHALL & OLIVER
T 2:00-4:30

The seminar explores health and disease in socio-cultural, political-economic, and historic contexts, with a particular focus on health disparities. The course is interdisciplinary (including anthropology, sociology, nursing and public health).

ANTH 7850 HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 NEIMAN
W 4:30-7:00

Historical archaeology is the archaeological study of the continental and transoceanic human migrations that began in the fifteenth century, their effects on native peoples, and historical trajectories of the societies that they created. This course offers an introduction to the field. It emphasizes how theoretical models, analytical methods, and archaeological data can be combined to make and evlaluate credible inferences about the cultural dynamics of the past. The class combines lecture and discussion with computer workshops, in which students have a chance to explore historical issues raised in the reading and lectures. Our principle historical focus this semester is change in the conflicting economic and social strategies pursued by Europeans, Africans, and Native-Americans, and their descendents in the 17th-century and 18th-century Chesapeake. The course is designed to teach students in architectural history, history, and archaeology how to use theoretical models, simple statistical methods, and software applications, including spreadsheets, databases, and GIS, to address important historical questions

ANTH 7880 ARCHAEOLOGY OF AFRICA 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
MWF 11:00-11:50

This course provides a survey of the archaeological knowledge currently available about the African continent, with particular emphasis on the Late Stone Age, when fully modern humans dominate the cultural landscape, up to the archaeology of the modern colonial period. The material includes the great social, economic, and cultural transformations in African history known primarily through archaeology, and the most important archaeological sites and discoveries on the continent. Throughout the course a theme will be the politics of the past, and the changing role of the practice of archaeology in Africa.