1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Fall 2011

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics
2559-1, 2190, 2210, 2230, 2280, 2310, 2320, 2559-1,3320, 5529-1, 5529-2 2500-1, 2559-2, 3152, 3155, 3550, 3590-01, 3590-02, 3680, 3700, 5510, 5529-03 2800, 2810, 3589-1, 3589-2, 3830, 3840 2400, 2420, 2557, 3450, 3480, 5420
Major Requirements
3010, 4991-1, 4991-2, 4991-3
Non-Western perspectives for the majors
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern equirement)
1010, 2500-1, 2559-2, 3152, 3590-01, 3590-02, 3680, 3700, 5510
Senior Seminars
4991-1, 4991-2, 4991-3

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 1010-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DOUGLASS
TR 1100-1215

 

ANTH 1010-002 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 HARR
MWF 1100-1215

This course introduces the student to some general topics of interest in cultural anthropology. Through readings, films, lectures and discussions student should come to an understanding of the extent of human diversity. We explore what anthropologists mean by "culture" and the methodology most associated with cultural anthropology, fieldwork. A number of societies from around the world provide examples of different practices regarding the meaning of "progress," language and belief, patterns of family relations, the social construction of identity, and the question of "race." We look at other cultures to develop an appreciation of cultural diversity and cultural relativism. However, the anthropological method is comparative, and the aim of anthropology is always to know our own culture better. Satisfies College's Non-Western Perspective Requirement.

ANTH 1050 ANTHROPOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION 3.0 ARMENGOL
MWF 0900-0950

Description to be posted

ANTH 2190 DESIRE AND WORLD ECONOMICS 3.0 MENTORE
MWF 1100-1150

This course offers an insight into the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services practiced by peoples ignored or unknown to classic Western economics. Its principle focus will open upon the obvious differences between cultural concepts of the self and the very notion of its desire. Such arguments as those which theorize on the "rationality" of the market and the "naturalness" of competition will be debunked.

ANTH 2210 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 3.0 MELISSA NELSON
TR 0930-1045

This course compares domestic groups in Western and non-Western societies. Considers the kinds of sexual unions legitimized in different cultures, patterns of childrearing, causes and effects of divorce, and the changing relations between the family and society.

ANTH 2230 FANTASY AND SOCIAL VALUES 3.0 WAGNER
MW 1600-1650

An examination of imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Attention is given to "alternate cultures" and fictional societal models. A "cultural imaginary" allows us to think carefully about implications of gender, technology, and social existence that we, for very good reasons, are not allowed to experiment upon. Three papers, mandatory attendance in lecture.

ANTH 2310 SYMBOL AND RITUAL 3.0 DOUGLASS
TR 1530-1645

This course will introduce the student to the social meaning of rituals and symbols. We will look at symbols not only in rituals but also those embedded in "everyday life." Likewise, we will study rituals not only as recognized ceremonies but also as accepted parts of our normal routines.

ANTH 2320 ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION 3.0 METCALF
MW 1100-1150

Ritual provides the characteristic approach of anthropology to the comparative study of religion, and the analysis of ritual is anthropology's major contribution to that project. Everywhere ritual permeates social life, yet in no other category of behavior is the exoticness of other cultures more in evidence. This course asks commonsense questions about religion and ritual, and shows how far we have come towards answering them in a century of theorizing. There are no prerequisites for this course, which is designed to be accessible to those with no background in anthropology.

ANTH 2400 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 3.0 ASHLEY WILLIAMS
MW 1300-1350

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Course includes an plus obligatory discussion section. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

ANTH 2420 LANGUAGE AND GENDER 3.0 CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 1100-1150

In many societies, differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation. We will compare gender differences in our own society with those in other societies including non-Western ones. Topics to be addressed include: the relation between gender difference and gender inequality (in scholarly discussion of language as well as in language itself); intersection of gender, race, and social class in language use; gender and non-verbal communication (including representations of gender in advertising and the media); issues of nature vs. nurture in explaining these differences. Requirements will include one or two papers based on fieldwork conducted jointly with a working group, participation in the required discussion section, and a take-home essay question exam focusing on the course readings and lectures.

ANTH 2500-001 CULTURES, REGIONS, AND CIVILIZATIONS: INSIDE IRAN: EVERYDAY LIFE IN THE ISLAMIC REPUBLIC 3.0 WELLMAN
MWF 1200-1250

This course will explore the cultural politics of kinship, Islam, and everyday life in post-revolutionary Iran. Moving beyond the sensationalist headlines, the course will use ethnographies on Iran (and elsewhere in the Middle East), films, and popular media to challenge commonly held assumptions about gender, martyrdom, and the veil the Islamic world. This course will additionally provide a very basic introduction to the anthropology of the Middle East and Islam, including concepts such as orientalism and islamaphobia.

ANTH 2557 LANGUAGE AND CINEMA 3.0 LEFKOWITZ
MW 0900-0950

This course takes a historical look at the role that speech and language have played in Hollywood movies. We will look at the artistic controversies, aesthetic theories, and technological challenges that attended the transition from silent to sound films as a backdrop to the main discussion of how gender, racial, ethnic, and national identities were constructed and reproduced through the representation of speech, dialect, and accent. This course provides an introduction to the study of semiotics but requires no knowledge of linguistics or of film studies.

ANTH 2559-001 INTERNET IS ANOTHER COUNTRY 3.0 ALVARADO
TR 1230-1345

We explore the Internet as a mode of exchange and communication that has produced a series of social institutions in the economic, political, and cultural spheres in the context of globalization. Using anthropological literature as our guide, we will describe and analyze emerging s ocial and cognitive formations associated with Facebook, Google, Wikipedia, and other Internet zones. Students will create an online ethnography of the web.

ANTH 2559-002 JAPAN: CULTURE & MODERNITY 1.0-4.0 ALISON ALEXY
TR 0930-1045

This course offers an introductory survey of Japan from an anthropological perspective. It is open without prerequisite to anyone with a curiosity about what is arguably the most important non-Western society of the last 100 years, and to anyone concerned about the diverse conditions of modern life. We will range over many aspects of contemporary Japan, and draw on scholarship in history, literature, religion, and the various social sciences. The requirements include two short papers and one longer final paper with a graded rough draft.

ANTH 2800 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
TR 4:30-5:20

This course introduces the history and goals of archaeological research, different theoretical approaches to the study of ancient societies and culture change, and archaeological methods. Alongside this study of archaeological method and theory, we will explore major transformations in human history through archaeological case studies and discoveries from important sites worldwide. The class meets as a lecture on Monday and Wednesday and students take an additional mandatory discussion section.

ANTH 2810 HUMAN ORIGINS 3.0 HANTMAN
MW 1400-1515

The course provides an overview and assessment of the theory, methods, and data used by anthropologists to reconstruct human physical and cultural evolution. Chronologically, the course spans the time from the initial appearance of distinctly human ancestors (ca 4.5 million years ago) to the period just prior to the rise of plant and animal domestication and early village life (ca 10,000 B.C.). The course is divided into three topical components: 1) a review of evolutionary theory, and the ever-growing American controversy surrounding that theory; 2) an in-depth survey of the data used to support current models of the complex ancestral tree of human evolution, and 3) a study of the origins of uniquely modern human behaviors of the relatively recent past, such as complex language, ritual, religion and art, as well as the question over how, when and where 'modern' humans evolved. Throughout we will examine anthropological perspectives in evolutionary studies as they compare and /or contrast with interpretations of unique (innate?) human behaviors argued for in the literature of evolutionary psychology and biology, as well as how those arguments are represented in the popular media and in public policy debates

The grade for the course is based on two quizzes (40% total) and a mid-term and final exam (60% total).

ANTH 3010 THEORY AND HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY 4.0 RATANAPRUCK
TR 1100-1215

This course is designed for students who are majoring in anthropology. It presents a broad historical outline of major theoretical approaches in the field, from the late 19th century to the present. These approaches will be examined in relation to both evolving debates within the discipline, and the larger historical, cultural and intellectual contexts in which they were produced, and which they to some degree reflect; we will also discuss the enduring relevance of these theories. The course stresses close reading of primary texts and emphasizes in particular the critical analysis of these texts' arguments. The discussion section is obligatory. This is a required course for anthropology majors.

ANTH 3152 AMAZONIAN PEOPLES 4.0 MENTORE
MW 1530-1645

Native Lowland South American people have been portrayed as "animistic", "totemic", "shamanic", "mythologic", "Dreauduan", "slash and burn horticulturalists", "stateless", "gentle", "fierce", and much more. What do these anthropological portraits mean and what do they contribute to the collective body of Western intellectual thought? Is there any relation between such thinking and the experience of being "Indian" in Amazonian societies? Are there any other ways of understanding the Amazonian social experiences? This course addresses these questions through a reading of the ethnography of the region. This course will satisfy the non-western perspectives requirement.

ANTH 3155 ANTHROPOLOGY OF EVERYDAY AMERICAN LIFE 3.0 DAMON
MWF 1000-1050

Taking a production and exchange orientation to society, this course uses anthropological models to analyze aspects of the US experience in North America and its extension into the world. The models will be drawn primarily from the anthropological analysis of exchange, rites of transition, sacrifice and mythology. Although introduced by issues drawn from the immediate questions of American culture, the course has a serious historical orientation. It runs from our 19th century foundation up to contemporary crises. In addition to attending class and a Discussion section students will write several response papers (2-4 pages/) and one research project outline/paper (10+/_ pages) built out of the response papers but involving additional library or ethnographic research. There will be no tests; in-class quizzes may be given. The course should satisfy Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 3320 SHAMANISM, HEALING AND RITUAL 3.0 TURNER
TR 1400-1515

The course delves into the sources of shamanism and ritual healing. It provides understanding of their different logic, and therefore why they communicate and heal. The class brings to life the reports and experiences of contemporary non-Western shamanic and healing rituals, maintaining respect for native interpretations in order to understand the effectiveness of their rituals. We will emphasize the human, personal experience of the events as living processes, and will use the in-depth studies of scholars who have become more than academics and who sometimes participate as practitioners of the crafts about which they seek knowledge. The experiencing and practicing of shamanism and healing being the actual life of these crafts, we will learn how to approximate a sense of these rituals by enacting them. A term paper is required, also a book presentation and short papers during the term.

ANTH 3450 NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGES 3.0 DANZIGER
MW 1400-1515

This course is an introduction to the native languages of the Americas and to the methods that linguists and anthropologists have used to record and analyze them. It covers linguistic analysis and theory as a way into knowledge of languages very different from English and the frequently studied European languages. The methods of analysis learned should enable students to make intelligent use of linguistic materials on languages in other parts of the world as well. The native languages of the Americas are many, diverse and unevenly studied. Generalizations about them all can rarely be very meaningful or penetrating. The best way to gain a genuine sense of the subject is to become familiar with one of the languages. Such familiarity will give more than acquaintance with that particular language. It will give insight into the nature of the data and problems of the field as a whole (i.e. the field of study of languages which have been, for their speakers, unwritten.) To achieve this purpose, the course is designed so that each student will be working on a different language for which adequate published materials are available. The major assignments involve that work. Pre-requisite: LNGS 325 (3250). This course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors.

ANTH 3480 LANGUAGE AND PREHISTORY 3.0 DANZIGER
MW 1000-1050

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics - the study of how languages change over time - and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the comparative-historical requirement for Linguistics majors.

ANTH 3550 ETHNOGRAPHY 3.0 METCALF
MW 1530-1645

Readings in Ethnography An ethnography is the characteristic way of presenting the results of research in anthropology. They provide our claim to knowing something interesting and useful about the world. But ethnographies vary widely in their style of presentation, theoretical underpinnings, and success at convincing the reader. This course explores this variety by close readings of half a dozen texts ranging over several continents. Requirements: this course is restricted to majors in anthropology who have already taken ANTH 301. It also requires weekly readings, for which there will be quizzes in class, plus two essays.

ANTH 3589-1 LANDSCAPE ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 NEIMAN
W 1630-1900

This course examines current archaeological approaches to the reconstruction and explanation of the ways in which humans at once shaped and adapted to past landscapes. It emphasizes current theory as well as GIS and statistical methods for the analysis of diverse data - from pollen spectra to topography. The course is structured around a series of projects in which students will have an opportunity to make sense of real archaeological data.

ANTH 3589-02 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY: LITHIC TECHNOLOGY 3.0 GEIB
F 0900-1130

Stone artifacts provide a principal means for inferring various aspects of human behavior in prehistory. Aside from lecture and seminar-like discussion, students will learn by making and using stone tools, collecting descriptive data from stone artifacts, and summarizing and interpreting those data in reports. This hands-on course focuses on production technology and tool use as a means for understanding these aspects with prehistoric artifacts.

ANTH 3590-01 TRANSNATIONAL EAST ASIA 3.0 FREEMAN
MW 14:00PM-15:15

South Korea and China are countries “on the move.” By this I refer to their tumultuous histories as well as the increased circulation of people, ideas, and objects within and across their national borders. Through cross-cultural comparison of China and South Korea, this course asks in what ways have border crossing-activities and mobility within circuits of global capitalism altered the way life is lived and imagined both at home and in Korean and Chinese communities overseas? Seeking new transnational milieu, we will explore the challenges that mobility poses to concepts of ethnic/national identity, citizenship, gender and family formation. Topics include, but won’t be limited to, the new forms of marriage and romance mediated by the global economy; diasporic cultures; migrant laborers and “split transnational families;” consumer practices; overseas entrepreneurs; transnational adoptees; and return migrants and their (re)encounter with their imagined homelands.

ANTH 3590-02 DEVELOPMENT AND CULTURE IN AFRICA 3.0 HULTIN
TR 11:00-12:15

This course draws on critical theory to examine social issues and development in Africa. It explores the general contours of European colonialism, national independence, and the position of African states in today's global economic order. The course exposes students to various theories of underdevelopment and draws on case studies (Sudan, Rwanda, South Africa) to discuss issues related to race, class, labor, gender, trade & HIV/AIDS.

ANTH 3680 ANTHROPOLOGY OF AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL ART 3.0 SMITH
TR 0930-1045

This class will study the intersection of anthropology, art and material culture focusing on Australian Aboriginal art. We will examine how Aboriginal art has moved from relative obscurity to global recognition over the past thirty years. Topics include the historical and cultural contexts of invention, production, marketing and appropriation of Aboriginal art.

ANTH 3700 CONTEMPORARY INDIA 3.0 KHARE
T 1400-1630

An anthropological discussion of selected changing aspects of and issues in India since independence, with a focus on interdependently transforming Indian modernity and traditions in the (a) changisng social organization; (b) leaders, caste politics and Indian democracy; (c) social inequalities, Indian modernity and the middle class; (d) religious diversity, religious rituals and politics; and (e) India in the Indian Diaspora.

ANTH 3830 NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 HANTMAN
TR 1530-1645

This course provides an overview of the contributions of archaeological research to our understanding of the long term history of North America, particularly the history of indigenous Native American people. Following an introductory study of the diverse history of archaeological research in North American from the 18th century to the present, the course shifts focus to specific topics of interest. Among these are the debate over the timing and process of the initial peopling of the Americas, the development of distinctive regional traditions, discussions of the origins of domestication and regional exchange systems and the rise and fall of chiefdoms in prehistory, colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans, and the historical archaeology of Europeans and Africans in Colonial America.

ANTH 3840 ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE MIDDLE EAST 3.0 WATTENMAKER
TR 1230-1345

We explore the prehistory and early history of the Middle East and Egypt, focusing mainly on the period from ca. 11,000 to 4000 BP. Through both lectures and discussion, we will examine archaeological research and findings on the origins of food production (the domestication of plants and animals), the earliest village communities, the origins of social ranking, the advent of state societies, urbanism and the origins of writing systems.

ANTH 4991-001 ANTHROPOLOGY, VIOLENCE, AND, HUMAN RIGHTS 3.0 NIKLAS HULTIN
M 1900-2130

This seminar examines how anthropology has approached human rights, what human rights can gain from anthropological insight, and the cultural meanings attached to human rights and violations thereof, such as genocide and discrimination. Among the questions we will address are: What are rights, and are they culture specific? What happens when cultural and religious norms contradict notions of universal human rights? Are some rights more important than other rights? Can, for example, political rights be ignored if it would help national security or socio-economic development or are there situations when women's rights should take a back seat to religious rights? How are violence and the absence of rights experienced and justified? And is there a culture of human rights, or do human rights activists have their own way of experiencing the world, viewing social issues, and seeking to effect legal and social changes?

ANTH 4991-002 ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE MIDDLE EAST 3.0 WATTENMAKER
MW 1500-1615

This seminar course explores the ways that Middle Eastern ethnographies have contributed to anthropological debates on topics such as history and memory, tribalism gender, religion and secularism, colonialism, nationalism, and markets. We will examine the portrayals of Middle Eastern societies in the Western world and consider how this has changed through time. Second, we will explore the relevance of archaeological and historical narratives to modern communities in the Middle East. Finally, a series of ethnographies (and films) will highlight both the heterogeneous nature of Middle Eastern societies and the anthropological issues confronted by these works.

ANTH 4991-003 TBA 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
TR 1100-1215

This seminar explores the comparative archaeology of colonialism, emphasizing European expansions post AD 1500 but contextualizing them against a backdrop of other archaeologically known examples, e.g., in the ancient Near East, the Classical Mediterranean world, and cases of internal colonialism. In addition to the archaeology itself, we will be considering the success of various perspectives in terms of translating and communicating the human experience of being colonized. The core of the class will be critical readings of case studies and attention to the changing theoretical landscape of colonialism studies. This course can fulfill the Second Writing Requirement.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 5420 THEORIES OF LANGUAGE 3.0 CONTINI-MORAVA
TR 1230-1345

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; weekly reading responses, a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course.

ANTH 5510 THE MIDDLE EAST IN ETHNOGRAPHIC PERSPECTIVE 3.0 LEFKOWITZ
MW 1530-1645

Survey of the anthropological literature on the Middle East & N. Africa. Begins historically with traditional writing on the "middle east" and proceeds to critiques of this tradition and attempts at new ways of constructing knowledge of this world region. Readings juxtapose theoretical and descriptive work toward critically appraising modern writers' success in overcoming the critiques leveled against their predecessors.

ANTH 5529-001 CULTURAL INVENTORIES 3.0 WAGNER
TR 1230-1645

This class uses the work of Jorge Luis Borges and Ludwig Wittgenstein to explore the "inventory" side of the language-phenomenon, the quixotic logic or order of experience that is manifest in what is said, or meant, or intended in the use of language, rather than in its syntax, grammar, or basic structure. It focuses on the logic of "what to say." Readings and discussion in seminar; course paper.

ANTH 5529-002 KINSHIP & CITIZENSHIP 3.0 ALEXY
TR 1400-1515

This seminar examines how kinship and citizenship intersect in contemporary societies. We will use these examples to understand how nation-states construct legal categories through, against, and in relation to family memberships. Particular attention will center on adoption, marriage, divorce, and inheritance cases that offer perspectives on the uses and effects of kinship in citizenship claims. In addition diverse ethnographic monographs and films, we will consider legal writing and research. Requirements include active discussion participation, regular short response papers, and a longer final paper.

ANTH 5529-03 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY: ETHNOGRAPHIC ISSUES, STUDIES AND INTERPRETATIONS 3.0 KHARE
R 1300-1530

Grounded in and guided by distinct anthropological ideas, field methods, experiences, and moral-ethical responsibilities, ethnography invites innovative explorations and experimentation for studying different major socio-economic, religious and transnational value issues. This seminar discusses distinct ethnographic studies on India/South Asia, America and Latin America concerning (a) ethnic alienation; (b) illness and social abandonment; (c) food ways and food politics under globalization; and (d) identity under local/global ethnic warfare. The IRB and some other field related issues will be discussed in the course.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 7010 HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY THEORY I 3.0 HANDLER
MW 14001515

This required course for first year graduate students explores the diverse intellectual roots of Anthropology from the 17th to the mid 20th Century.

ANTH 7450 NATIVE AMERICAN LANGAUGE 3.0 DANZIGER
MW 1400-1515

This course in an introduction to the native languages of the Americas and to the methods that linguists and anthropologists have used to record and analyze them. It covers linguistic analysis and theory as a way into knowledge of languages very different from English and the frequently studied European languages. The methods of analysis learned should enable students to make intelligent use of linguistic materials on languages in other parts of the world as well. The native languages of the Americas are many, diverse and unevenly studied. Generalizations about them all can rarely be very meaningful or penetrating. The best way to gain a genuine sense of the subject is to become familiar with one of the languages . Such familiarity will give more than acquaintance with that particular language. It will give insight into the nature of the data and problems of the field as a whole (i.e. the field of study of languages which have been, for their speakers, unwritten.) To achieve this purpose, the course is designed so that each student will be working on a different language for which adequate published materials are available. The major assignments involve that work. Pre-requisite: LGS 325, LGS 701 or ANTH 740. This course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics graduate students.

ANTH 7480 LANGUAGE AND PREHISTORY 3.0 DANZIGER
MW 1000-1050

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics - the study of how languages change over time - and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment.

ANTH 7541 TOPICS IN SOCIOLINGUISTICS: METHODS OF ANALYZING DISCOURSE 3.0 BECHTER
M 1700-1930

The close analysis of language use is a valuable tool in the critical study of sociocultural reproduction. What range of communicative media make fluent discourse possible? How do referential units cohere in speech and depend on cultural context? How do kinds of social interaction support one another in larger discursive "regimes"? In this seminar, we survey key microanalytical approaches to discourse and explore them through independent recordings, transcriptions and class presentations. Beyond examining established schools such as conversation analysis, pragmatics, interactional sociolinguistics, and the ethnography of communication, we also explore work on the interface of gesture and speech, and consider larger discursive structures. Class is based heavily on student-led discussion and student questions submitted each week. Grades will be based on participation and on a final paper pursuing the student's research.

ANTH 7559-001 POLITICAL ECONOMY 1.0-4.0 RATANAPRUCK
R 1530-1800

The course examines how 'economic facts' are embedded in larger social, political, and cultural contexts. It explores ways in which people of different cultures and societies organize themselves to facilitate production, exchange, and consumption of material goods, as well as to meet non-material needs. It will examine a range theoretical frameworks and the diversity of social, historical, and ideological contexts in which they emerged.

ANTH 7589 LANDSCAPE ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 NEIMAN
W 1630-1900

This course examines current archaeological approaches to the reconstruction and explanation of the ways in which humans at once shaped and adapted to past landscapes. It emphasizes current theory as well as GIS and statistical methods for the analysis of diverse data - from pollen spectra to topography. The course is structured around a series of projects in which students will have an opportunity to make sense of real archaeological data.