1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Spring 1997

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Cultural Diversity Archaeology Linguistics
225,320,327,334,337

256,260,351,358,365,
366

281,280,285 240
Non-Western perspectives
101,240,256,260,320,327,
334,358,365,366
Senior Seminars 
401A, 401B, 401C

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 101 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3) DEETZ
MWF 1100 - 1150

An integrative survey with attention to the major subfields of anthropology: human origins, archaeology, anthropological linguistics, cultural anthropology, and folklore. This is a broad introductory course covering human evolution, the relationship of language to thought, cultural diversity and cultural relativity.

USEM 171-003 PROGRESS (2) METCALF
T R 1400 - 1600

Westerners have been deeply attached to the idea of progress since the Enlightenment. But it is not universal; elsewhere, and in the past, people have conceived of a world constantly in decline from an unrecoverable golden age. In the nineteenth century, rapid technological change inspired almost limitless confidence in progress, but at the same time the success of evolutionary theories introduced a more somber note. At the height of the industrial revolution and the New Imperialism, social Darwinists like Herbert Spencer argued that some were inevitably left behind in the forward struggle. This course raises a series of questions about our notion of progress. What are its ideological roots? How are either related to whatever we might think of as social or moral progress? As the twentieth century closes, can we still believe in progress?

USEM 171 VISUALIZING THE OTHER, VISUALIZING OURSELVES (2) SAPIR
W 1400 - 1600

This seminar will examine two topics: 1. How have anthropologists, since the 1 9th Century, represented "the other" by visual means. How do we understand these images and how do they contribute to the task of Anthropology. 2. By way of contrast, who do we visualize ourselves - in snap shots and family albums. Each student will give oral presentations on each of the two topics.

ANTH 225 NATIONALISM, RACISM, & MULTICULTURALISM (3) HANDLER
M W 1400 - 1515

This course examines nationalism, racism, and multiculturalism as interrelated ideologies of the modern world. It focuses on how groups-~ whether nations, races or cultures—are defined in public discourse today, and on the political and social consequences of those definitions. Examples are drawn from Canada, the United States. the Caribbean. and elsewhere.

ANTH 236 CASTANEDA AND DON JUAN (3) WAGNER
T R 930 - 1045

The six books of Carlos Castaneda represent what is perhaps an anthropological ideal- - a world in which the native's concepts of power, sorcery, and transformation are "real" rather than the social systems, adaptations, and symbolic processes generally used to explain them. They are not ethnography; in his latest preface Castaneda prefers to treat them as "autobiography." Yet they can be used very effectively to illustrate a wide range of concepts in anthropology and traditional religions, which is what this seminar is all about. It will not teach you to fly, it may teach you to write, but it will, hopefully, help you to understand how anthropologists think. The course will be given in an open seminar format, with discussion encouraged. Grades will be based on three course papers.

ANTH 240 LANGUAGE & CULTURE (3) ROSS
TR 1400 - 1515

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists, and how data from languages are used in related fields as evidence of cultural, social and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, use of linguistic evidence to make interferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication.

ANTH 256 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF AFRICA (3) LAVIOLETTE
M W F 1000 -1050.

This course surveys the cultural landscape of modern Africa, through the close reading of a selection of ethnographies, novels, social histories, and African feature-length films. This material is taught against a backdrop of major economic strategies, varieties of social organization, and socioeconomic problems facing many Africans in the late 20th century. We discuss elite and poor urban dwellers, rural farmers, pastoralists and hunter/gatherers; settings in all four "corners" of Africa; and Islam, Christianity, and other spiritualisms. Although the course ranges widely both geographically and culturally, it is not an attempt to depict all of modern Africa; rather, it seeks to focus on certain themes of wide relevance in Africa in this century. The course requirements will be a combination of short essays, a midterm and final exam, a map quiz, and class discussion.

ANTH 260 IMAGES OF INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 1400 - 1630

A non-technical introduction to the society and culture of India by the use of a selection of novels and films. This course fulfills the non-westem requirement.

ANTH 280 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3) TBA
T R 1 230 -1 345

Topics will include alternative theoretical approaches to the study of prehistory and cultural change, methods and techniques of excavation, regional survey and dating, and the construction of economic, political, social and religious organization of prehistoric societies. Case-studies will be drawn from both the Old and the New World.

ANTH 281 HUMAN ORIGINS (4) HANTMAN
M W F 1100-1150

This course consists of a lecture and discussion section. The discussion section . . is required. This course is intended to provide an overview and assessment of the theory, methods, and data used by anthropologists to reconstruct human physical and cultural evolution. Chronologically, the course spans the time from the initial appearance of hominids (ca 4.5 million years ago) to the period prior to the rise of urbanism and early state formation (ca. 10,000 B.C.). The course is divided into three topical components: 1 ) a review of evolutionary theory, and the controversy surrounding that theory; 2) an in- depth survey of the data used to support current models of the pattern of human evolution, and 3) a study of the origins of modern human adaptations in the relatively recent past, with respect to uniquely human behaviors such as complex language, ritual, religion and art.

ANTH 285 AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE (3) DEETZ
M W F 0900 - 0950

Using a structural anthropological approach, this course treats changes in several categories of American material culture, including ceramics, architecture, mortuary art, foodways and trash disposal. Emphasis is placed on the way in which these changes reflect a fundamental transformation of the way in which Americans perceived the world in which they lived. In addition, Native American, African American, and Asian American examples will be discussed, to show how they were different from the dominant European Americans.

ANTH 301 HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY (4) MCKINNON
T R 1230-1345

This course consists of a lecture and discussion section. The discussion section is required. A review of the major theoretical developments in the field of anthropology from nineteenth century evolutionism to postmodernism. Restricted to 3rd and 4th year anthropology majors

ANTH 320/ 720 MARRIAGE, GENDER AND POLITICAL ECONOMY (3) SHEPHERD
MW 1400 -1515

Cross-cultural comparison of marriage and domestic groups, analyzed as a point of intersection between cultural conceptions of gender and a larger political economy. Detailed analysis of marriage transactions, inheritance, and household formation. Puts recent changes in American marriage in historical and comparative perspective. Readings will include ethnographic, historical, and analytical treatments. No pre-requisites. This course is cross-listed with Women's studies. Will fulfill second writing.

ANTH 327/727 POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) CROCKER
MW 1530 - 1645

Reviews the variety of political systems found outside the western world. Examines the major approaches and results of anthropological theory in trying to understand how radically different politics work.

 ANTH 334 CULTURE, SPACE AND NATURE (3) DAMON
M W F 10:00-1050

This course forges a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology. Its intent is to provide new insights on how human cultures both fashion and are fashioned by their environment. Topics covered will range from ethnobiology and ethnomedicine to the relationship between global change and its impact on human culture. Ethnographic examples will be employed from the Amazon, the Pacific Islands, East and South Asia, and one or mrore modern societies.

ANTH 337/737 On Power and the Body (3) MENTORE
R 1530 - 1800

The human individual, as subject to the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of Western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as the constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will study the intimacy between relational power and the knowing body. We will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, the medical body, the tattooed body, the divine body, the sovereign body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced.

ANTH 351 CONFLICT AN3 ETHNICITY IN THE BALKANS (3) SHOTT
M W F 1300 - 1350

Situated at the crossroads of East and West, the Balkans have been variously referred to as incomprehensible, intractable, and hopelessly mired in histories of conquest and confrontation. "Conflict" and "ethnicity" inevitably arise in discussions of the region, and they are frequently cited as its defining features. With a focus on the former Yugoslavia, this course will examine anthropological, and other, literature in an attempt to generate new understandings of these concepts in the Balkan context.

ANTH 358/758 CREOLE NARRATIVES (3) MENTORE
TR 1100-1215

We begin with the 18th and 19th century Caribbean intellectual life. We do so from the perspective of European imperialism and its influences upon colonized values, slavery, race, class and colour. We tend to examine the persistence of these major themes through the 20th century, formalized in the battle of ideas between the elite of the "mother"country and the Creole upper classes. We will attempt to read the images of the Creole "self" and explore their claims for a crisis of identity. We will also focus on the so-called spiritual character of the Creole personality. We shall conclude by looking at the way in which the specifics of island culture have directed nation building and how they appear to have helped in the perpetuation of ideological and political independencies.

ANTH 359 ETHNOPHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M 1930 - 2200

This course will be composed of two parts- academic and workshop. The academic part of the course will involve tracing the development of photojournalism from date of Lewis Hine to the present. Students will search through 30 years of "LIFE" Magazine for "ethnophotographic reportage and give oral reports on selected photographers. The workshop will be an ethnophotography project. It will involve going out and taking pictures in a controlled situation and getting all necessary permissions. The work will then be mounted and presented to a jury in which you will explain what is going on and for what reasons.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and knowledge of darkroom techniques.

ANTH 365 ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCES (3) FREEMAN
MWF 1200-1250

This course will explore the story of Asian immigration to America within a comparative framework that emphasizes the commonalities and differences in the experiences of Chinese, Korean, Filipino, Asian Indian and Southeast Asian Americans. A range of Asian Americans' own perspectives on their experiences will come through reading book-length life histories. The course aims to set these personal accounts in their global context by examining the complex circumstances that have influenced how Asian immigrants and their descendants were and are being received in America. Aside from historical perspectives, contemporary issues to be discussed include the ambiquities of treating Asian Americans as a collective entity, anti- Asian-American violence and resistance to oppression, the myth of the "model minority", generational differences, women's status, and the place of Asian Americans in the matrix of black-white race relations. Prior knowledge of Asian or Asian-American history is not required.

ANTH 366/766 CHINA: EMPIRE AND NATIONALITIES (3) SHEPHERD
TR1400-1515

Tibetans, Mongols, Manchus, Turkic Muslims, peoples of Yunnan, aborigines of Taiwan; a Chinese state has incorporated all these groups in recent centuries. This course explores the distant and recent history of Han and non-Han nationalities in the Chinese empire and nation-state. The course will examine the reaction of minority nationalities to Chinese predominance, and the bases of Chinese rule and cultural hegemony. The course explores changes in gender roles, ethnic and subethnic (i.e., intra-Han) identity formation, processes of ethnic conflict, and the emergence of separatist and nationalist movements. The course also examines the role of minorities in the definition of Chinese nationalism, and China as a multi-cultural society and an historic empire. The course will offer a critique of Eurocentric theories of colonialism, modernity, and world system. Course will fulfill second writing requirement.

ANTH 401A SENIOR SEMINAR (3) FRASER
M W 1530 - 1645
Culture and Reproduction

This senior seminar will focus on the social, cultural, and physiological factors which frame the experience of, knowledges about, and practices associated with birth, pregnancy, and sexuality in human societies. We will use the contemporary United States as a reference point for our discussion of reproduction, but then the course will range across different cultures and societies, past and present, in order to understand how a universal fact--biological reproduction--takes on specificially cultural and human dimensions. The course will examine the interrelationship between reproducing societies and reproducing people. Come prepared to write a long research paper, participate actively in class discussion and projects, and consider your own history of ideas about and experience with reproduction and reproductive practices.

ANTH 401 B SENIOR SEMINAR (3) CROCKER
Rethinking Symbolic Anthropology
W 1930 - 2200

"No description available at this time."

ANTH 401C SENIOR SEMINAR (3) WATTENMAKER
TR 1400- 1515
The Archaeology of Symbolism

Much controversy surrounds the question of whether anthropologists can investigate the symbolic aspects of society through archaeological research. This courses examines the theoretical underpinnings of this debate, the ways in which various archaeologists have studied the symbolic dimensions of societies, and the controversies surrounding their findings. Some of the topics we will examine include archaeological approaches to changing concepts of space and time, the symbolic uses of goods in various societies, and the construction of social identity (particularly rank and gender). We will also examine the symbolism of the past in various cultures, and relations between the past and present in modern societies.

ANTH 401 D SENIOR SEMINAR (3) WAGNER
TR 1230- 1345

This seminar explores the synthesing capabilities, the power or grasp of meaningfulness behind what is usually called the "symbolism" of a number of indigenous peoples. Beginning with Navajo religion and world view, the course examines as well examples from the mythology, symbolism, and material culture of Venezuela and of several Melanesian peoples.

 


Courses open to both Graduate & Undergraduate Students

ANTH 504 LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
M 1400 - 1630

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence not likely to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We will try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language entirely on the basis of data collected from the language consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include one paper on phonology, one on morphology, and one on syntax (the nature of the assignments may vary depending on the particular language being studied). Prerequisites: LING 325/701, Anth 240, or permission of instructor.

ANTH 517 PROBLEMS OF VISUAL DOCUMENTATION (3) SAPIR
M W F 1000 -1050

Interpreting visual materials - especially photographs and film - from an anthropological perspective. A variety of documents will be considered including images created by late 19th and early 20th century anthropologists, classic documentary films, the work of documentary photographers, especially Lewis Hine and those photographers associated with the FSA during the late 1 930's, and the work of photojournalists. What is the value of vernacular photography to Anthropology? How does a modern anthropologist use and create visual documentation?

ANTH 522 ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3) DAMON
M 1900 - 2130

Consideration of western economic theories and their relevance to non-western societies and the comparative analysis of different forms of production, consumption, and circulation.

ANTH 529 SCIENCE AND CULTURE (3) MCKINNON
W 1830 - 2000

This course examines science as a cultural artifact. Topics to be addressed include: the historical development of science in relation to other cultural domains; the significance of its demographics; the historical development and cultural logic of its methodologies, practices, and rhetorical strategies; the definition of particular objects of study; and the intersection between science and larger social and political projects. Enrollment via Isis is limited to anthropology graduate students; others must obtain permission of the instructor.

ANTH 543 PRACTICUM IN ETHNOLOGY OF SPEAKING (3) V HYMES
T 1400 -1630

This course is designed to give local field experience in studying the interaction of language and social life. The emphasis will be on the collection and analysis of data from participant observation in a variety of speech situations in the University and its wider community. Readings will be chosen to give the theoretical and methodological background of the ethnography of communication and to provide cogent examples of its implementation.

ANTH 549 COGNITIVE & FUNC. LING THEORIES (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
TR1230-1345

Contemporary linguistics offers two competing models of language. In one, language is a self-contained system whose organizing principles are "hard-wired" into the human brain as part of our biological inheritance, and cannot be explained in terms of either more general cognitive processes or in terms of the social functions that language performs. This approach has been most closely associated with Noam Chomsky and the schools of linguistics that he has inspired. The alternative view, that will be the focus of this seminar, seeks explanations for linguistic phenomena in two areas: general cognitive principles used by human beings to make sense out of the world, and the communicative goals of language users. Each of these latter perspectives treats linguistic structure as "motivated" by something that ranges beyond language itself, but they tend to look in different directions: the "cognitive" linguists connect their work with cognitive psychology, and the "functionalists" connect their work with philosophical pragmatics and sociolinguistics. Examples of cognitive and/or functionalist linguists: George Lakoff, Ronald Langacker, Sandra Thompson, Roman Jakobson, William Diver. We will critically examine work that represents both approaches.

ANTH 556 BUDDHISM AND SOCIETY (3) SENEVIRATNE
R 1800 - 2030

Elements of the Buddhist Doctrine, historical and sociological circumstances of its origin and spread, and its conceptual and contextual affinities with society and polity. Material from Buddhist kingdoms of South and Southeast Asia will be examined.

ANTH 572 ARCTIC SHAMANISM AND HEALING (3) TURNER
M 1930 - 2230

The seminar will first study arctic conditions and the human technologies developed to cope with them; then the history of shamanism as the prime ameliorative agency in the past; finally close-up accounts of present-day Inupiat healing, along with discussion of its survival in the face of Western medicine. The course will be concerned with understanding the viewpoint of the practitioners themselves. Changing Western attitudes in the study of ritual will be examined. New directions in the anthropology of experience will be explored in the light of recent work on healing and spirit possession.

ANTH 588 QUANTITATIVE METHODS (3) PLOG
Hours TBA

This course examines quantitative analytical techniques used in archaeology. Topics include seriation, regression analysis, measures of diversity, and classification. Pre-requisite: A course in introductory statistics.

 


Courses restricted to Graduate Students

ANTH 702 CURRENT THEORY (3) METCALF
W 1400 - 1630

This course is required of graduate students in their second semester, and is not normally available for other students. It deals with the main currents of anthropological thoughts since World War II, a half century in which separate English, French, and American traditions influenced each other to produce a broad and sophisticated international discipline.

ANTH 706 RESEARCH DESIGN (3) METCALF
T 1700 - 1930

This course is available for graduate students actively engaged in preparing research grant applications for the summer and fall of 1997. After some introductory readings, the course comprises a workshop in which students present their draughts for collective review and critique. Each student is required to produce during the course of the semester at least three draughts following the format of NSF research proposals.

ANTH 711 PAPER AND PRESENTATION (3) LAVIOLETTE
T 1900 - 2130

This course is available for graduate students in their fourth semester, as they prepare to fulfill their Paner and Presentation requirement.

ANTH 732 AMERICAN FOLKLORE (3) PERDUE
T 1900 - 2130

This course will focus primarily of Anglo- and Afro- American traditional culture and, within that domain, deal with problems of definition, orgin, collection, and analysis of the main genres of folklore-narrative and song.

ANTH 733 ETHNOHISTORY (3) PERDUE
TR 1400 - 1515

This course offers an introduction to ethnohistory, considers various sources and methods for conducting ethnohistorical research, and requires a practical application of these to an historical case study in Albemarle County. Conceptions of group identity and culture, or "ethnos"--based on race, ethnicity, class, or situation-- and of the nexus between history and anthropology will be discussed, with some consideration given to contemporary ethnohistorical case studies that address issues of contact, conflict, control, and commodification.

ANTH 783 ARCHAEOLOGY Il: STATES AND EMPIRES (3) WATTENMAKER
MW 1530-1645

Case studies from the Old and New Worlds provide the basis for evaluating classic and recent constructs proposed by anthropologists for the emergence and organizational dynamics of complex societies. Some specific topics covered in the class include theories on state formation, political, economic, and social dynamics in state societies, urbanism, and archaeological approaches to empires.