1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Spring 2000

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Cultural Diversity Archaeology Linguistics
236,251,317,329,334,337,
359,332,520,522,529

222,253,346,367,354

280,383,388,582 240,341,349,504
Non-Western perspectives
101,240,332,341
Senior Seminars 
401A, 401B, 401C

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 101 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3) HANDLER
T R 1400 - 1500

This course provides an introduction to human diversity as studied by the four fields of anthropology: biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology and sociocultural anthropology. Special attention is given to diversity imagined in terms of race, language, culture and history; "Western" and "non-Western" worldviews; and egalitarian and hierarchical social systems. Meets non-western perspectives.

ANTH 222 BUDDHISM (3) SENEVIRATNE
T R 9:30 - 10:45

An introduction to the sociology of Buddhism. Discusses the transformation of an ethical religion of an urban elite into a ritualistic mass religion of the peasantry. After a brief introduction to the Buddhist Doctrine, its social origins and the sociology of its transformation are discussed with particular reference to the orthodox traditions of Burma, Thailand and Sri Lanka.

ANTH 236 CASTENEDA & DON JUAN (3) WAGNER
T R 09:30 - 10:45

The six books of Carlos Castaneda represent what is perhaps an anthropological ideal-a world in which the native's concepts of power, sorcery, and transformation are "real" rather than the social systems, adaptations, and symbolic processes generally used to explain them. They are not ethnography; in his latest preface Castaneda prefers to treat them as "autobiography." Yet they can be used very effectively to illustrate a wide range of conception anthropology and traditional religious, which is what this course, is all about. It will not teach you to fly, it may teach you to write, but I will hopeful, help you to understand how anthropologists think. The course will be given in an open seminar format, with discussion encouraged. Grades will be based on 3 papers.

ANTH 240 LANGUAGE & CULTURE (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
T R 12:30 - 13:45

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how languages are used in related fields as evidence of cultural, social, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication.

ANTH 251 PRIMITIVE ART/CIVILIZED PLACES (3) BOLES
T 1530 - 1800

This course focuses on the art of small scale societies in terms of 1) its epresentation or "symbolic meaning," 2) the social functions of art and its relation to style, use and value, and 3) art as mediation between individuals and societies. Taught by the curatorial staff of the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, the course will concentrate on the indigenous art of Australia and the Americas, with some coverage of Africa and Oceania. Texts will include Primitive Art in CivilizedPlaces by Sally Price and The Anthropology of Art by Robert Layton. Requirements include a mid-term essay, a slide quiz in the first half of the term, a slide quiz in the second half of the term, and a final exam.

ANTH 253 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS (3) CULLEY
M W F 10:00 - 10:50

This class is an introduction to the anthropology of Native Americans in North America. It provides a broad overview of pre-Columbian, colonial, and contemporary time periods using materials drawn from archaeology, linguistics, and sociocultural anthropology.

ANTH 280 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3) LAZAZZERA
M W F 12:00-12:50

In this class, I introduce the history, methods and theories of American Archaeology in the context of several case studies from around the world. Students will track the development of modern archaeology as a social science from the antiquarianism of the late 19th century. In doing so, we will connect changing views of the past with contemporary social concerns and technological advances in the field. Shifting the focus onto current practices, students will then learn archaeologist strategies for reconstructing the past. I will present specific techniques for recovering meaning from material remains within students will link method and theory. They will critically review archaeological interpretations of history and prehistory using selected examples of recent investigations.

ANTH 300 PERSPECTIVES FOR MAJORS (1) TBA
M 1:00 - 1:50

Perspectives for Majors are a required course for all majors. It has three main goals. To introduce students to University wide resources of interest to Anthropology majors, including, the research resources at the university libraries; administrators, advising and mentoring, sources of funding for undergraduate anthropological research, including field projects or internships. Second, to introduce students to departmental faculty and to the range of research and teaching interests represents in the department, Third, to create an environment where students will begin to identify the sets of intellectual and practical skills that they have or intend to develop as anthropology majors.

ANTH 301 HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY THEORY (3) MCKINNON
T R 11:00-12:15

This course will provide a survey of anthropological theory from the late 19th-century up to the present. We will explore a diverse range of anthropological approaches developed over the course of the century, including: 19th-century evolutionism, Boasian cultural anthropology, British structural-functionalism, French structuralism, British symbolic anthropology, American cultural materialism and neo-evolutionism, later American cultural anthropology, feminism, and postmodernism. We will be concerned to understand these approaches not only as theoretical frameworks for understanding other cultures, but also as cultural and historical productions, in themselves. The discussion session is obligatory. Restricted to Anthropology majors.

ANTH 317/717 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) SAPIR
M W F 11:00-11:50

This course is divided into three major topics with more-or-less equal weight given to each: still photography in Anthropology - then and now, with an examination of the use of still photographs in old as well as current ethnographies; the use of film and video in Anthropology and the great tradition of American documentary photography from Jacob Riis and Lewis Hine to its hay day in Life magazine from 1936 to the mid 1960's. Students will divide up into teams that will be responsible for giving oral presentations. Over and above the regular class hours a time and place will be arranged where films would be shown. Course is limited to 20 students.

ANTH 329/719 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, AND FERTILITY (3) SHEPHERD
T R 11:00-12:15

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality be gender, age, and class. The impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternative, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 101 or equivalent recommended as background. This is an advanced course, adding to general offerings in social organization, kinship, marriage, and gender. This course is cross-listed with women's studies. Upper level majors and non-majors. This course satisfies the second writing requirement and non-western.

ANTH 332 SHAMANISM, HEALING, AND RITUAL (3) TURNER
TBA

This course delves into the sources of shamanism and ritual healing, and provides an understanding of their inner processes and how they can be effective. The class will "unpack" the meanings of contemporary non-western rituals, keeping respect for their veridicy and function. Performance of ritual being its actual life, we will learn how to approximate a sense of ritual by performance. A term paper is required, also short papers during the term. Meets Non-Western Perspectives.

ANTH 334 ECOLOGY & SOCIETY (3) DAMON
M W F 11:00-11:50

This course attempts to 1) introduce students new to anthropology aspects of culture theory and contemporary ecological/environmental anthropology'; 2) forge a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology;' 3) provide new insights on how human cultures both fashion and are fashioned by the environments; 4) provide a seminar-like context in which we can evaluate, as anthropologists and citizens of our world, aspects of the current environmental' debate in our culture; and 5) facilitate independent study on environmental issues on the part of each student. In addition to tests and the independent study project paper, the course will be taught in two parts. Lectures based on readings will occupy every Monday and Wednesday. Fridays shall be devoted to a Seminar' format in which we read and discuss a recent book or two devoted to one or another aspect of the environment.' Although ethnographic examples will draw from the whole world, special emphasis will be placed on societies bordering the Pacific Ocean and in the Asias. Students from the Departments of Biology, Chemistry and Environmental Sciences are especially invited to join this course.

ANTH 337/737 ON POWER AND THE BODY (3) MENTORE
11:00-12:15

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body in fact seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced. Course satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 341/741 SOCIOLINGUISTICS (3) DANZIGER
M W F 10:00-10:50

Sociolinguistics is the study of the way language is used to express social relationships in the speech community. Topics to be covered include language as an index of socio-economic class, Black English, male-female language, pidgin and Creole languages, the analysis of everyday conversation, and political, legal, and social issues affecting language in multilingual societies, including ours. Midterm and final; field project involving observation of language use in the speech community. Meets non-western requirement.

ANTH 346 AFRICAN ORAL LITERATURE (3) SAPIR
M W 14:30-15:45

This semester (Spring) the course will concentrate primarilyon the oral literature of the Sene-Gambia of West Africa. Two major topics will be an examination of Mandang Oral Epics and Kujamaat Jóola Extemporaneous Funeral Songs. We will also examine the g enres of proverbs and folk tales among others. This course will be taught jointly with Professor Kandioura Dramé of the French Department, where it is listed under a different number. Enrollment is limited to 12 under Anthropology and 12 under French.

ANTH 349/749LANGUAGE AND THOUGHT (3) DANZIGER
R 1530-1800

There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others do to individuals? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of more recent cross-intelligence, linguistic structure and general cognition. In the course of the discussion, we consider topics such as the significance of literacy for cognition, and the development of language-specific cognitive preferences during childhood. We also ask how our own culturally particular ways of talking about language might reflect and reinforce some of the unexamined "common-sense" ideas about the nature of language which underlie most linguistic research. During the term, students will prepare short written summaries of assigned readings, and a longer research paper. Fulfills second Linguistics requirement for Anthropology Graduate Students.

ANTH 354 DEAF CULTURE (3) FJORD
M W F 1200-1250

The American Civil rights movement provided a framework in the 1960"s for the social politicization of deaf people in the U.S. and Scandinavia, particularly. Within this framework, deaf people may self-identify as members of a cultural group - Deaf people - with valued languages and traditional distinct from the primary hearing parents'. Yet, increasingly inalienable rights to signed languages and access has been tied to different meanings and statuses as minorities or "disabled" people in each national context. This course is a cross-cultural analysis of histories, representations, education, and identity politics in the U.S., Denmark, and Sweden with some data from Norway and Uganda. Discussion of the cochlear implant, medical diagnoses of deafness, and generic counseling are included.

ANTH 359 ETHNOPHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M 1930 - 2200

This course will be composed of two parts: academic and workshop. The academic part of the course will examine specific photographic work that can be thought of as "ethnographic" in some way. The materials will be drawn from documentary photography exemplified by LIFE magazine. Students will give oral reports, to be w ritten up, on selected works. The workshop will be an ethnophotography project. Students will find an appropriate field subject to photograph. The work will be displayed in "photo essay" and presented to a jury. Prerequisites are permission of the ins tructor and knowledge of darkroom techniques. Course limited to 9 undergraduate students and one graduate student. The course meets at the instructor's home.

ANTH 367 VIETNAMESE CIVILIZATION (3) ROSS
W 1600 - 1830

This course examines the continuities and discontinuities in recurring themes of "traditional" Vietnamese culture from the horticultural Neolithic to the present. The class size is limited in order to facilitate class discussion and the sharing of study materials. Students will write several short essays on a variety of topics. The class fulfills second writing requirement.

ANTH 383 NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) HANTMAN
T R 1400-1515

This course provides an overview of the contributions of archaeological research to our understanding of the long term history of North America, from the prehistoric to the historic era. Topics include the current controversy over the initial human settlement of the Americas, the development of distinctive regional Native American regional traditions, the cyclical patterns of development of hierarchical societies (e.g. Chaco, Mississippian, Powhatan), interaction between Indians and European colonists, and the historical archaeology of Europeans and Africans in colonial America. The grade for the course is based on two research papers (ca. 10 pp. each) and a final examination.

ANTH 388/788 AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) LAVIOLETTE
M W F 10:00 - 10:50

In this lecture and discussion class we begin with a brief overview of human evolution, from the earliest australopithecines to the emergence of modern humans in the Middle to Late Stone Age. We then slow the pace and deal in greater depth with Late Stone Age and Iron Age societies, up through the archaeology of European colonialism. Although we cannot touch on all the topics of interest over this vast time period and continent, the goals of the course are to give you solid footing in the broad themes, most important details, and controversies in African archeology. Areas of focus include great archaeological sites; hunter/gatherer societies; plant and animal domestication; technological and social innovations of the Iron Age; Nile Valley peoples; medium-range and large-scale societies; the archaeology of Islam; the Trans-Saharan, Atlantic and Indian Ocean trades; and the politics of archaeology in the developing nations on the African continent.

ANTH 401A SENIOR SEMINAR: POPULAR CULTURE IN INDIA (S) SENEVIRANTE
M 1400-1630

An ethnography of the film in India. Discusses the indigenisation f an alien art form using existing aesthetic and performative cultures; the social significance of the cinema as a modern medium; the stratificational and nationalist bases of the film; and non-mainstream film.

ANTH 401B SENIOR SEMINAR: LANGUAGE AND EMOTION (3) LEFKOWITZ
W 1500-1730

This course looks at the nexus among language, culture, and emotion, exploring the various approaches scholars from anthropology and linguistics have taken in looking at emotion. Specific topics covered include: emotion in the natural vs. social sciences ; cross-cultural conceptions of emotion; historical change in emotion discourses; emotion as a theory of the self; the grammatical encoding of emotion in language; (mis-) communication of emotion; and emotion and the construction of racialized and gendered identities. Restricted to Anthropology majors 3rd or 4th year.

ANTH 401C SENIOR SEMINAR: ANCIENT MESOPOTAMIAN CULTURES (3) WATTENMAKER
M 1500-1800

Films, archaeological findings and translated ancient documents provide the basis of this examination of ancient Mesopotamian cultures. We will use these sources to gain insight into key changes that took place as the first cities formed, such as the establishment of social stratification, the formation of urban society, and an increasing reliance on writing. Ethnographies from the modern Middle East also serve as a source of models for interpreting ancient societies in this part of the world. Finally, we will consider the relevance of the archaeology of southern Iraq for modern societies living both in the Middle East and elsewhere.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 504 LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
W 1400-1630

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class.) We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from a native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include one paper on phonology, one on morphology, and one on syntax (the nature of the assignment may vary depending on the particular language being studied). Prerequisites: Ling 325/701, ANTH 240, or permission of the instructor.

Anth 509 HISTORICAL ETHNOGRPAHY (3) DEETZ
T 2:00-4:30

Historical Ethnography is an undergraduate/graduate seminar in which different aspects of life in seventeenth century Plymouth Colony are considered. In addition to presentation and discussion of material covering its early history and the subsequent mythology which has grown up surrounding these events, attention will be focussed on the social and material world of the Colony. Seminar members will also participate in research during class using primary source materials - court records, wills and probate inventories - to determine biographical details concerning early colonists and answer questions related to aspects of the work under discussion.

There will be no examinations, but each class member will have to submit a paper at the midterm and one at the end of the semester based on research done during the semester. The research results of the seminar are part of an ongoing project on Plymouth Colony which supports its own web site and publishes there some of the work submitted -- The Plymouth Colony Archive Project at the University of Virginia at http://www.people.virginia.edu/~jfd3a

ANTH 520 KINSHIP: LOCAL & GLOBAL (3) MCKINNON
R 1800 - 2030

This course will focus on the shifting nature of kinship relations in the context of the global economic restructuring, increased labor migration, and the political, religious, racial, and gender hierarchies that are characteristic of the emerging global political economy. We will examine a range of issues including: the "stratification of reproduction," the consequences of national reproductive policies (pro-natalist as well as restrictive), the effects of forms of labor and migration on gender and kinship relations, transnational/cultural/racial adoptions and marriages, mail-order brides, the new reproductive technologies across national boundaries, and the creation of family life in the space-time compression of the global order. This course is open to graduate and upper level undergraduate students. Each student will research a topic of his or her owns choosing and writes a 20-page paper.

ANTHROPOLOGY 522 ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3) DAMON
M 1900 - 2130

This course introduces students to anthropologically useful ideas in Marxism and world system theory, provides an introduction to the last 30 years of writing in 'exchange theory,' and highlight some main avenues of research in newer versions of ecological anthropology and the anthropology of resource extraction in the West. The course syllabus will be devoted to these divisions, though not in equal time slots. Students will write 5-10 page papers on each of these three parts, increasingly bending there papers to their longer-term research interests. Individualized oral reports are also expected. In addition to the three Parts, there will be one two week section devoted to a collective examination of McDonalds in the international context: We shall debate the place of the organization of production versus consumption relations for the kind of structured activity which McDonalds represents.

ANTH 529 MYTHODOLOGY (3) WAGNER
T R 12:30 - 1:45

No description at this time.

ANTH 569 SELECTED TOPICS: THE INVENTION OF CULTURE (3) METCALF
T R 1230-1645

Starting with Roy Wagner's pioneering volume, this course examines the chequered careers of the key words: "culture," "society," and "ethnicity." It reviews the intense deconstructive pressure on them in the last decade, and assesses the resulting impact on fieldwork and ethnographic writing.

ANTH 582 LANDSCAPE ARCHAEOLOGY (3) NEIMAN
W 1500 - 1730

While the archaeological study of past landscapes is not new, over the past decade the study of people's experience and strategic manipulations of their anthropogenic environments has become an increasingly important research focus across the discipline. This seminar examines approaches and methods currently in play in the reconstruction an explanation of landscape dynamics. About half the course is devoted to practical application in the context of Monticello and the greater Chesapeake region, from ini tial European settlement to the Civil War. Both agricultural and ornamental landscapes will be considered. Five daylong Saturday sessions are required, during which students will participate in landscape archaeological fieldwork at Monticello.

ANTH 584 ARCHAEOLOGY OF STATES AND EMPIRES (3) WATTENMAKER
W 1400 - 1630

In this seminar course, we examine topics of major methodological and theoretical concern to archaeologists studying ancient complex societies, regardless of regional focus. Some of the topics include the organizational dynamics of ranked and state socie ties, state formation, and approaches to urbanism. We will use case studies from regions such as Mesoamerica, the Middle East and Indus Valley to evaluate various widely used models for complex societies, such as World Systems Theory and Peer Polity Interaction.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 702 - CONTEMPORARY THEORY (3) MENTORE W 1500 - 1730

The course continues the agenda of ANTH 701, reviewing the development of anthropological theory from the nineteen forties to the present. It is required of, and normally restricted to, all graduate students in their second year.

ANTH 704 RSEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS (ETHNOGRAPHY IN AMERICA) (3) PERDUE
T R 1400 - 1515

This will be an upper level undergraduate and graduate level course designed for students to become familiar with a selection of ethnographic worked that have focused on various groups in America, defined ethnically, racially, regionally, or by class. To that end students will read and critique one or two ethnographies. Students will also conduct a "mini" ethnographic study of an appropriate group, scene, or situation: Perhaps a nursing home, pool hall, church, hospital emergency room, festival or celebration. The point here is to gain some training in participant obser vation and to learn to "see." Take notes, and write up the results. 

In class, discussion will consider some of the issues involved in ethnographic study: role of the ethnographer; ethics of field work; various ethnographic methodologies such as note taking, interviews, tape and/or video recording, and photography.

Second year students in the National Science foundation track will be required to prepare and submit a proposal for summer research money.

ANTH 706 RESEARCH DESIGN (3) METCALF
TBA

This workshop is open to graduate students in their second year or beyond whom are actively preparing doctoral research project and writing grants to support that research. During the course of the semester students will work through repeated research drafts of a proposal following the NSF format, so that they will be ready to commence application cycle of granting agencies in the fall.

ANTH 711 PAPER AND PRESENTATION (3) LAVIOLETTE
T 1900-2130

This workshop is for second-year graduate students in Anthropology preparing their Paper and Presentation. Students circulate and discuss their P-and-P ideas, abstracts, and drafts among the class members, and practice their presentations, all of which helps to strengthen the project being supervised by each student's P-and-P committee. The course grade is based on attendance and participation, and the course cannot be audited.

ANTH 717/317 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) SAPIR
M W F 11:00-11:50

This course is divided into three major topics with more-or-less equal weight given to each: still photography in Anthropology - then and now, with an examination of the use of still photographs in old as well as current ethnographies; the use of film and video in Anthropology and the great tradition of American documentary photography from Jacob Riis and Lewis Hine to its hay day in Life magazine from 1936 to the mid 1960's. Students will divide up into teams that will be responsible for giving oral pre sentations. Over and above the regular class hours a time and place will be arranged where films would be shown.

ANTH 729/329 MARRIAGE, MORALITY, AND FERTILITY (3) SHEPHERD
M W 14:00 - 15:15

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential imp act of morality be gender, age, and class. The impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternative, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and r emarriage; (3) fertility decision making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 737/337 ON POWER AND THE BODY (3) MENTORE
T R 11:00-12:15

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fa scinated us. The body in fact seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will att empt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced.

ANTH 749/349LANGUAGE AND THOUGHT (3) DANZIGER
R 1530-1800

There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others do to individuals? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of more recent cross-intelligence, linguistic structure and general cognition. In the course of the discussion, we consider topics such as the significance of literacy for cognition, and the development of language-specific cognitive preferences during childhood. We also ask how our own culturally particular ways of talking about language might reflect and reinforce some of the unexamined "common-sense" ideas about the nature of language which underlie mos t linguistic research. During the term, students will prepare short written summaries of assigned readings, and a longer research paper. Fulfills second Linguistics requirement for Anthropology Graduate Students.

ANTH 788/388 AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) LAVIOLETTE
M W F 10:00 - 10:50

In this lecture and discussion class we begin with a brief overview of human evolution, from the earliest anstralopithecines to the emergence of modern humans in the Middle to Late Stone Age. We then slow the pace and deal in greater depth the Late Stone Age and Iron Age societies, up through the archaeology of European colonialism. Although we cannot touch on all the topics of interest over this vast time period and continent, the goal of the course are to give you solid footing in the broad themes, mo st important details, and controversies in African Archeology. Areas of focus include great archaeological sites; hunter/gatherer societies; plant and animal domestication; technological and social innovations of the Iron Age; Nile Valley 1