1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Spring 2001

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics
236, 317, 329, 336

222, 253, 256, 350,
353a, 362, 365, 367

280, 282, 284, 384,
587, 589, 592
240, 341, 504
Non-Western perspectives
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern requirement)
101, 240, 341
Senior Seminars 
401A, 401B, 401C

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 101 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPLOGY (4) NASH
TR 9:30-10:45

An integrative survey of the history of anthropology, with an emphasis on archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. This is a broad introductory course covering language and thought, material culture, cultural diversity and cultural relativity. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the breadth of the field. Human origins and folklore will also be introduced.

ANTH 222 BUDDHISM (3) SENEVIRATNE
TR 1400-1515

This course is about how Buddhism is practised in different cultures. It is not about Buddhist doctrine, although a section of the course is devoted to doctrine and its historical and sociological context. We will examine data from Buddhist cultures, mostly of the Southern or Theravada tradition, best represented by, Burma, Thailand and Sri Lanka.

ANTH 236 CASTENEDA & DON JUAN (3) WAGNER
TR 9:30-10:45

The six books of Carlos Castaneda represent what is perhaps an anthropological ideal-a world in which the native's concepts of power, sorcery, and transformation are "real" rather than the social systems, adaptations, and symbolic processes generally used to explain them. They are not ethnography; in his latest preface Castaneda prefers to treat them as "autobiography." Yet they can be used very effectively to illustrate a wide range of concept ion anthropology and traditional religious, which is what this course, is all about. It will not teach you to fly, it may teach you to write, but I will hopeful, help you to understand how anthropologists think. The course will be given in an open seminar format, with discussion encouraged. Grades will be based on 3 papers.

ANTH 240 LANGUAGE & CULTURE (3) CONTINI-MORAVA MW 2:00-3:15

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists, social, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communications.
Satisfies the non-western requirement.

ANTH 253 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS (3) NEVINS
MW 1400-1515

This class is an introduction to the anthropology of Native Americans in North America. It provides a broad overview of pre-Columbian, colonial, and contemporary time periods using materials drawn from archaeology, linguistics, and sociocultural anthropology.

ANTH 256 PEOPLE AND CULTURES OF AFRICA (3) LAVIOLETTE
MWF 13:00-14:00

This course engages the human landscape of modern Africa, through the close reading of a selection of monographs and African feature films from diverse cultural and geographical areas. The main texts, drawn from fiction, ethnography, and social history, are taught against a backdrop of economic strategies, Different forms of social organization, cultural expressions, and challenges facing modern African women and men. An edited volume on Africa will provide relevant essays to combine with and contextualize the monographs and films. We will focus on rural farmers, urban dwellers, both the elite and poor, and the forces that draw all of these together; transnational migration; and belief systems. How relationships between men and women are contextualized and negotiated is a theme found throughout the readings and films, as well as the struggle of people in different circumstances to build new relationships with older beliefs and practices, and with new forms of government. This course does not attempt to familiarize students with all issues and peoples in modern Africa, but rather to distill and feature certain themes of especially wide relevance. This is a lecture and discussion course.

ANTH 280 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (4) AULTMAN
TR 1530-1645

In this class, I introduce the history, methods and theories of American Archaeology in the context of several case studies from around the world. Students will track the development of modern archaeology as a social science from the antiquarianism of the late 19th century. In doing so, we will connect changing views of the past with contemporary social concerns and technological advances in the field. Shifting the focus onto current practices, students will then learn archaeologist strategies for reconstructing the past. I will present specific techniques for recovering meaning from material remains within students will link method and theory. They will critically review archaeological interpretations of history and prehistory using selected examples of recent investigations. Instructor permission required.

ANTH 282 RISE OF CIVILIZATION (3) RAINVILLE
MW 1530-1645

In this course we will focus on the emergence of complex society in the Old(Mesopotamia, Egypt, Indus Valley) and New (Valley of Mexico, Maya Lowlands,Andean highlands) Worlds in order to consider reasons for cultural similarities and differences. We will combine archaeological, textual, and ethnographic evidence to understand the establishment of villages at the end of the Ice Age through the origin of the first cities. Topics discussed include the origins ofagriculture and its effect on society, the shift from egalitarian societies to those with social ranking, the rise of cities, and the beginnings of writing. By highlighting the wide range of variability in pre-industrial civilizations, the course examines the role of cultural values in shaping the organization of early societies.

ANTH 284 WORLD PREHISTORY (3) WILLS
TR 1100-1215

World Prehistory is a survey of the archaeological record of human evolution from the earliest evidence for Homo sapiens to the appearance of urban civilizations. The course will focus particularly on the archaeology of "emergence", when dramatic and fundamental changes occurred in human societies. Topics will include the pyramids of dynastic Egypt, Stonehenge, mound builders of the Mississippi Valley, ancient ceremonial cities of the Maya, the Great Wall of China, ritual centers of Hawaii's and Easter Island, and the Pueblo people of the American Southwest.

ANTH 300 PERSPECTIVES FOR MAJORS (1)
M 1200-1250

Perspectives for Majors are a required course for all majors. It has three main goals. To introduce students to University wide resources of interest to Anthropology majors, including, the research resources at the university libraries; administrators, advising and mentoring, sources of funding for undergraduate anthropological research, including field projects or internships. Second, to introduce students to departmental faculty and to the range of research and teaching interests represents in the department, Third, to create an environment where students will begin to identify the sets of intellectual and practical skills that they have or intend to develop as anthropology majors.

ANTH 301 HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL (3) VANN
MWF 9:00-9:50

This course will provide a survey of anthropological theory from the late 19th century to the present. We will explore a diverse range of anthropological approaches developed over the course of the century, including: 19th-century evolutionism, Boasian cultural anthropology, British structural-functionalism, French structuralism, British symbolic anthropology, American cultural materialism and neo-evolutionism, American culture theory, and postmodernism. We will consider these approaches not only as theoretical frameworks for understanding other cultures, but also as cultural and historical productions, in themselves. The discussion session is obligatory. Restricted to Anthropology majors.

ANTH 317/717 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) SAPIR
TR 12:30-13:45

This course is concerned with visual representation in Anthropology as it has been practiced and might be practiced. It is divided primarily into two major topics: the use of film and video and the use of still photography. Film (and now video) has played a seminal role in Visual Anthropology with many classic films starting with Robert Flaherty's Nanook of North and running up to recent work of such film makers as David MacDougall. Since still photography has not played much of a role in recent anthropology (outside of casual photos and photos as illustration) we must turn elsewhere for serious material. For that we will examine the great tradition of documentary photography from John Thomson in London and Jacob Riis and Lewis Hine in the US to its hay day in Life magazine from 1936 to the mid 1960's. Students will divide up into teams that will be responsible for giving oral presentations covering specific films and photographic topics. Course is limited to 20 students.

ANTH 318/718 SOCIAL HISTORIES OF COMMODITIES:
LINKAGES BETWEEN AFRICA AND THE AMERICAS (3) SABEA
TR 9:30-10:45

This course examines how certain agriculture products turned into world commodities linking, in the process of their production, exchange and consumption, diverse places and people around the globe. The main focus is on the connections between Africa and the Americas through the movement of people and commodities. Informed by production, exchange and consumption theories the course focuses on coffee, sugar and tobacco, primarily in terms of where they originated; when, where and how they transform into commodities of daily consumption; and the conditions under which they are produced, enter into circulation, and the meanings associated with their consumption.

ANTH 319 ANTHROPOLOGY OF BIRTH AND DEATH (3) BELLOWS
M 14:00

This course will examine the processes of birth and death through a focus on the body and its transformation during the life-cycle. Students will be asked to think about what the handling and manipulation of bodies during birth and death tell us about what it means to be human at these different stages through an examination of ethnography both from the United States and Bali, Indonesia.

ANTH 320A/720A KINSHIP: GLOBAL AND LOCAL (3) MCKINNON
TR 15:30-16:45

This course will focus on the shifting nature of kinship relations in the context of the global economic restructuring, increased labor migration, and the political, religious, racial, and gender hierarchies that are characteristic of the emerging global political economy. We will examine a range of issues including: the "stratification of reproduction," the consequences of national reproductive policies (pro- and anti-natalist), the effects of forms of labor and migration on gender and kinship relations, transnational/cultural/racial adoptions and marriages, mail-order brides, the new reproductive technologies across national boundaries, and the creation of family life in the space-time compression of the global order. This course is open to upper level undergraduates and graduate students. Each student will research a topic of his or her own choosing.

ANTH 329/729 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, AND FERTILITY (3) SHEPERD
MW 14:00 - 15:15

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality be gender, age, and class. The impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternative, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations. ANTH 101 or equivalent recommended as background. This is an advanced course (for upper level majors and non-majors), adding to general offerings in social organization, kinship, marriage, and gender. This course is cross-listed with women's studies.
This satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 341/741 SOCIOLINGUISTICS (3) DANZINGER
MW 1100-1150

Socio linguistics is the study of the way language is used to express social relationships in the speech community. Topics to be covered include language as an index of socio-economic class, Black English, male-female language, pidgin and Creole languages, the analysis of everyday conversation, and political, legal, and social issues affecting language in multilingual societies, including ours. Midterm and final; field project involving observation of language use in the speech community.
Non-Western Perspectives requirements.

ANTH 350 READINGS IN ETHNOGRAPHY (3) KHARE
T 1530-1800

A comparative reading and discussion of selected ethnographies, and of appropriate materials on related methods and techniques, for illustrating rich relationships of ethnography to anthropology, and for comprehending diverse human experiences in other cultures in relation to one's own.

ANTH 353A ANTHROPOLOGY OF EASTERN EUROPE (3) MAKAROVA
TH 1100-1215

No description

ANTH 359 ETHNOPHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M 19:30 - 22:00

This course will be composed of two parts: academic and workshop. The academic part of the course will examine specific photographic work that can be thought of as "ethnographic" in some way. The materials will be drawn from documentary photography exemplified by LIFE magazine. Students will give oral reports, to be written up, on selected works. The workshop will be an ethnophotography project. Students will find an appropriate field subject to photograph. The work will be displayed in a "photo essay" format and presented to a jury. Prerequisites are permission of the instructor and knowledge of darkroom techniques. Digital photography will not be used. The course is limited to 9 undergraduate students and one graduate student. The course meets at the instructor's home. Instructor's permission required.

ANTH 362 IMAGES OF INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 1400 - 1630

A non-technical introduction to the society and culture of India by the use of a selection of novels and films.

ANTH 365 ASIAN-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (3) FREEMAN
MWF 1100-1150

This course attempts to examine the ways in which the interplay of race, class and gender have shaped the experiences of Asians in the United States, past and present. One objective will be to familiarize students with the major topics, issues and research that characterize the field of Asian American Studies. We will explore the political, economic and social circumstances surrounding the successive waves of Asian immigration to the U.S., the restructuring of kinship ties, gender roles, and generational relations in response to migration, and the ongoing negotiation of racialized and gendered images of both immigrant and American-born Asians from the mid-19th century to the present. A second objective is to gain the skills necessary to conduct "hands-on" ethnographic research through participation in an oral history project. Students will direct the content of class discussions during the final quarter of the semester by drawing upon the findings of their fieldwork experiences.

ANTH 367 VIETNAMESE CIVILIZATION (3) ROSS
M 1500-1730

This course examines the continuities and discontinuities in recurring themes of "traditional" Vietnamese culture from the horticultural Neolithic to the present. The class size is limited in order to facilitate class discussion and the sharing of study materials. Students will write several short essays on a variety of topics. The class fulfills the Arts and Sciences multicultural requirement and the second writing requirement.

ANTH 384/784 HOUSEHOLD ARCHAEOLOGY (3) RAINVILLE
TR 1400-1515

Although households are the social and economic foundation to all societies, they are often overlooked in research designs and subsequent theorizing about ancient civilizations. In this course, we investigate the form, function, and conceptualization of houses and households in a variety of societies. We explore household behavior through the distribution of material culture in and the architectural form of houses. In addition to the wide range of archaeological data (including the house itself, features, and artifacts), we will utilize textual, ethnographic, and ethnoarchaeological data. In the first part of the course we will look at the form and function of houses. In the second part, we will look at daily life within Old and New World households.

ANTH 401A THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF COLONIALISM (3) LAVIOLETTE
MW 1400-1315

This seminar explores the archaeology of colonialism by foregrounding European expansion, about which we know the most, against a backdrop of colonialism and the archaeology of expansions generally. We will review pertinent, recent literature on colonialism and colonial historiography, to help inform our analyses of archaeological studies. We will discuss various models used to interpret sites on colonial frontiers, and examine how different archaeologically-known expansions, such as the Uruk expansion in the ancient Near East, the Romans, the Vikings, and the so-called Bantu expansion of Iron Age Africa--are conceptualized in comparison to more recent European colonialism. The core of the class will be close readings and discussions of case studies, bringing to bear the above considerations. Student responsibilities include participation in class discussion, preparation of weekly discussion questions, occasional presentation of readings, and one or two research papers totaling 20 pages on a topic relating to the class themes. This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 401B THE CULTURAL LOOKING GLASS: OTHER'S PORTRAITS OF US (3) BASHKOW
TR 1100-1215

This senior seminar will examine the small but provocative genre of writings that portray (or purport to portray) "the West" from the perspectives of its others in different parts of the world. What can we learn from such writings about the concept of "the West" and self/other relations? How do such writings contrast with the incomparably larger body of writings by western authors about non westerners? Finally, what do we learn about the anthropology of our own lives? Readings will be drawn from fiction, memoirs, travel accounts, and ethnographies.

ANTH 401C LANGUAGE AND THOUGHT (3) DANZIGER
M 2-4.30

There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others to individuals? Can we learn about alternative ways of approaching the external world by studying other languages? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of recent cross-cultural psycholinguistic research. We highlight the interplay between social intelligence, linguistic structure and general cognition. In the course of this discussion we approach the question of how language-specific cognitive preferences could develop in the course of children's language acquisition. Finally, we ask how culturally-particular ways of talking about language itself might reflect and reinforce the `common-sense' ideas about the nature of language that underlie most linguistic research. During the term, students will prepare short written summaries of assigned readings, and a longer research paper.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 504 LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
T 15:30 - 18:00

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class.) We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from a native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include one paper on phonology, one on morphology, and one on syntax (the nature of the assignment may vary depending on the particular language being studied). Prerequisites: Ling 325/701, ANTH 240, or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 508 METHOD AND THEORY IN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) NEIMAN
T 1900-2130

How can we decipher what happened in the past from the mute bones and stones that comprise the archaeological record? This seminar examines the principle answers to this question that can be found in the recent Anglo-American literature. The emphasis is on clarifying the epistemological assumptions and methodological entailments of different theoretical approaches, and the sense in which accounts of the past produced using them may be evaluated with reference to theoretical structures in adjacent fields of study, empirical evidence, and political concerns. The course aims at understanding archaeological theory in contemporary practice. Because treatments of some crucial theoretical topics are unavailable in the contemporary literature and because much of the current literature is a polemical reaction to what has gone before, we will selectively sample earlier work. Permission of the instructor required.

ANTH 517 TIME IN GLOBALIZATION (3) BASHKOW
TR 1700-1815

This seminar on the anthropology of time will focus on the relationship between systems of time, history, and globalization. Topics for discussion will include the centrality of time concepts in western ideas of modernity and society; the importance of clocks and regularized time practices in European imperialism and the industrial revolution; diverse time systems in pre-industrial Europe and nonwestern societies; western Newtonian and relativist theories of time; theories of the "sense of time" and time's social construction; representations of time in narrative and rhetoric; case studies of different peoples' experiences of western time in colonial and contemporary development; the acceleration of time and competition in global capitalism and on the internet. Readings will be drawn from the work of anthropologists, philosophers, physicists, political economists, literary critics, and historians of science.

ANTHROPOLOGY 522 ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3) DAMON
TR 9:30-10:45

This course introduces students to anthropologically useful ideas in marxism and world system theory, provides an introduction to the last 30 years of writing in 'exchange theory,' and briefly, highlights some main avenues of research in newer versions of ecological anthropology and the anthropology of resource extraction in the West, especially with respect to the Indo-Pacific Region. The course syllabus will be devoted to these divisions, though not in equal time slots. Students will write 5-10 page papers on each of the three parts, increasingly bending their papers to their longer-term research interests. Individualized oral reports on tangential readings are also expected, and will enable individual students to work on something appropriate to their own areas. Additionally, there will be one two week section devoted to a collective examination of McDonalds in the international context: We shall debate the place of the organization of production versus consumption relations for the kind of structured activity which McDonalds represents

ANTH 529 MYTHOLOGY (3) WAGNER
TR 1230-1345

No Description

ANTH 529C CLIMATE AND THE HISTORY OF HUMAN CULTURE (3) DAMON, HAYDEN, MANN
W 2:00-5:00

This course addresses the interaction between human history and the climatic environmental factors that have in part shaped it. Topics will include the Pleistocene/Holocene transition and development of agrarian societies in the Fertile Crescent, putative abrupt climate events in the mid-Holocene, the onset of El Nino in the Holocene and its influence across the Indo-Pacific region and South America, and the relation between climate and worldwide cultural changes during the past 1500 years. Other topics include the relationship between cross-continent or transoceanic winds and cultural development, and the problem of cultural order and climate/weather understanding.

Contact Michael E. Mann, Bruce Hayden (both in Department of Environmental Sciences) or Fred Damon (Department of Anthropology) for further information. Damon in particular is looking for a student or two who might 1) be knowledgeable about calendrical or temple systems, or histories of agrarian systems in either or both South and East Asia and who would want to push their understanding of those systems up against what the course teaches about climate; and 2) have some ethnographic knowledge of either or both West Africa and the Amazon and wish to trace the effects of winds from the Sahara on those regional systems. Permission of Instructor same as evat 493/793

ANTH 533 ETHNOHISTORY & RESEARCH METHOD (3) PERDUE
TR 1400-1515

This graduate and upper-level undergraduate course offers an introduction to ethnohistory, considers some sources and methods for conducting ethnohistorical research, and applies them to an historical case study, using Albemarle County civil records and other documentary and secondary sources. Conceptions of group identity and culture, or "ethnos"-based on race, ethnicity, class, or situation-and of the nexus between history and anthropology will be discussed, with some consideration given to contemporary ethnohistorical case studies that address issues of contact, conflict, control, and commodification.

ANTH 544 PHONOLOGY AND MORPHOLOGY (3) DOBRIN
MW 1400-1515

This course introduces students with some linguistic background to the analysis of sound and word structure. The first half of the course will focus on phonology, beginning with traditional phonemics and the decomposition of segments into features. We will consider issues such as redundancy, rule interaction, and abstractness that arise in the generative rule-based approach, and then turn to more recent representational theories such as autosegmental phonology, metrical phonology, and feature geometry. The second half of the course will be divided between theories such as lexical phonology and prosodic morphology, which assimilate morphology to phonology, and approaches to morphosyntactic phenomena such as inflection, noun incorporation, agreement, and compounding. We will end on the question of whether there is such a thing as pure morphology. Students will apply the concepts they are learning on weekly data sets.

ANTH 546 TESOL: CULTURE, THEORY, AND METHOD (3) ROSS
TR 12:30-1:45

Study of the theory, problems, and methods in teaching English as a second language, with attention to relevant cultural matters and areas of general linguistics. (Permission of instructor required.)This course is designed for students intending to specialize in the teaching of English to non-native speakers. The course will include approaches to second language learning, the discussion of trends in the methodology of teaching, the critical examination of currently available teaching materials, and the discussion of problem in English phonology and syntax which present special problems in teaching. The approach used is eclectic and pragmatic. Students in the course are expected to be serious in their goals and to have some background in linguistics or in foreign languages

ANTH 589 CURRENT DEBATES IN SOUTHWESTERN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) WILLS
R 1900-2130

No Description

ANTH 572A RELIGION IN ANTHROPLOGICAL RESEARCH (3) TURNER
W 1900-2130

Shamanism, healing, and the performance of ritual are experiential phenomena. The seminar deals with aspects of anthropological research concerned with the experiencing of the original sources of religion in cultures, from the point of view of the people in the field. Experience, as Victor Turner said, is anthropology's truest material; the course will be valuable for fieldworkers in the social sciences. The class will survey the works of William James, Teilhard, Carl Jung, and recent researchers to assess the state of the art in religious anthropology and to seek future discoveries.
Meets Non-Western Perspectives (Meets in instructors home)

ANTH 587 ZOOARCHAEOLOGY (3) WATTENMAKER
W 1400-1630

No Description

ANTH 592 NEAR EAST (3) WATTENMAKER
M 1900-2130

No Description

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 702 - CONTEMPORARY THEORY (3) SABEA
TR 1400-1515

The course continues the agenda of ANTH 701, reviewing the development of anthropological theory from the nineteen forties to the present. Special attention is devoted to the relationship between system, structure, process, and agency as they developed in theoretical engagements with the concepts of power, practice, personhood, symbol and meaning, history, time/space/body, and political economy. The course also draws on recent debates within anthropology and across disciplinary boundaries in relation to globalization, trans-"nationalism", post-"modernism", and post-"colonialism". The course is required of, and normally restricted to, all graduate students in their second year.

ANTH 704 ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHDS (3) SHOTT
M 14:00-1630

This course provides a critical introduction to the practice of ethnographic research. It is a course about methodology, broadly understood as the "science of methods" and construed through the relationship between theory and the formulation, identification, and implementation of research methods. We will explore the extent to which research design and practice constitute and impact one another, and we will discuss specific methods and techniques for generating data relative to a given theoretical perspective or ethnographic context. Ethnographic research is intensely personal and intimate, and we will consider how the researcher figures in the ethnographic enterprise and what ethical issues arise in its practice. With the anthropological goals of interpretation and understanding firmly in mind throughout, the basic questions that drive our inquiry are: "What constitutes data?" and "How do we get it?"

ANTH 706 RESEARCH DESIGN (3) MCKINNON
W 1500-1730

This workshop is open to graduate students in their second year or beyond whom are actively preparing doctoral research project and writing grants to support that research. During the course of the semester students will work through repeated research. During the course of the semester students will work through repeated draughts of a proposal following the NSF format, so that they will be ready to commence application cycle of granting agencies in the fall.

ANTH 711 PAPER AND PRESENTATION (3) MOST
T 1400-1630

This course is available for graduate students in their fourth semester, as they prepare to fulfill the Paper and Presentation requirement.

ANTH 717/317 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) SAPIR
TR 1230-1345

This course is concerned with visual representation in Anthropology as it has been practiced and might be practiced. It is divided primarily into two major topics: the use of film and video and the use of still photography. Film (and now video) has played a seminal role in Visual Anthropology with many classic films starting with Robert Flaherty's Nanook of North and running up to recent work of such film makers as David MacDougall. Since still photography has not played much of a role in recent anthropology (outside of casual photos and photos as illustration) we must turn elsewhere for serious material. For that we will examine the great tradition of documentary photography from John Thomson in London and Jacob Riis and Lewis Hine in the US to its hay day in Life magazine from 1936 to the mid 1960's. Students will divide up into teams that will be responsible for giving oral presentations covering specific films and photographic topics. Course is limited to 20 students.

ANTH 718/318 SOCIAL HISTORIES OF COMMODITIES:
LINKAGES BETWEEN AFRICA AND THE AMERICAS (3) SABEA
TR 9:30-10:45

This course examines how certain agriculture products turned into world commodities linking, in the process of their production, exchange and consumption, diverse places and people around the globe. The main focus is on the connections between Africa and the Americas through the movement of people and commodities. Informed by production, exchange and consumption theories the course focuses on coffee, sugar and tobacco, primarily in terms of where they originated; when, where and how they transform into commodities of daily consumption; and the conditions under which they are produced, enter into circulation, and the meanings associated with their consumption.

ANTH 720A/320A KINSHIP: GLOBAL AND LOCAL (3) MCKINNON
TR 15:30-16:45

This course will focus on the shifting nature of kinship relations in the context of the global economic restructuring, increased labor migration, and the political, religious, racial, and gender hierarchies that are characteristic of the emerging global political economy. We will examine a range of issues including: the "stratification of reproduction," the consequences of national reproductive policies (pro- and anti-natalist), the effects of forms of labor and migration on gender and kinship relations, transnational/cultural/racial adoptions and marriages, mail-order brides, the new reproductive technologies across national boundaries, and the creation of family life in the space-time compression of the global order. This course is open to upper level undergraduates and graduate students. Each student will research a topic of his or her own choosing.

ANTH 729/329 MARRIAGE, MORALITY, AND FERTILITY (3) SHEPERD
MW 14:00 - 15:15

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality be gender, age, and class. The impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternative, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 741 SOCIOLINGUISTICS (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 1100-1150

No Description

ANTH 753A ANTHROPOLOGY OF EASTERN EUROPE (3) MAKAROVA TR 1100-1215

No Description