1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Spring 2002

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics
236,250,290,328,329,334
335,337,529,533,572A
222,256,350,353,
362,561,565
280,381,387,389
588
240,247,342,541,542,
543,546,549
Non-Western perspectives
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern requirement)
101, 222,240,256
Senior Seminars 
401A, 401B, 401C
Historical Studies Requirements
387

Undergraduate Courses:

 ANTH 101 INTRO. TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3) HANDLER
T R 0800-0915

This is a broad introductory course covering race, language, and culture, both as intellectual concepts and as political realities. Topics include race and culture as explanations of human affairs, the relationship of language to thought, cultural diversity and cultural relativity, and cultural approaches to current crises. Meets Non-Western Perspectives Requirement.

ANTH 222 BUDDHISM (3) SENEVIRATNE
TR 1400-1515

An introduction to Buddhism as a social phenomenon. Discusses in outline the main doctrines of Buddhism, the historical and social background of its origin, and its cultural manifestations in the peasant societies of South and Southeast Asia.

ANTH 236 CASTENEDA & DON JUAN (3) WAGNER
TR 9:30-10:45

This course encourages a reconceptualization of the thought and practice in Castaneda's first nine books, through the student's active participation in lecture, discussion, readings, and especially papers written to assigned topics. A culture re-perceived through the designs of a radically different cognitive worldview is not a culture, society is not society, life is not life, and death is not death. The course offers a counter example to all that may be familiar in our world, neither believable nor unbelievable, and a chance to get a sense of how anthropologists think. Grades will be based on 3 papers.

ANTH 240 LANGUAGE & CULTURE (3) SUSLAK
MWF 0900-0950

This course introduces the study of language use as a central aspect of social life. In it we will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how linguistic data can shed light on a variety of cognitive, cultural and social phenomena. We will survey a variety of topics central to linguistic anthropology and related fields such as the nature of language, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, verbal art, linguistic variation and change, language and identity, and how norms of language use are established and maintained.
No prior knowledge of linguistics is required.

ANTH 247/AMEL 247 REFLECTIONS OF EXILE: JEWISH LANGUAGES AND THEIRCOMMUNITIES (3) LEFKOWITZ
TR 0930-1045

This course looks historically and comparatively at Jewish languages and the communities in which they have been used. We will explore general questions of the relationships among sociocultural groups, their languages (or language varieties), and the literatures they produce by reading about Yiddish, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic from literary, cultural, and historical perspectives. No prior knowledge of these languages is required.
(Please note that this course is also listed as AMEL 247. If Anth 247 fills up, students can sign up under AMEL listing and still have it count as an Anth course.)

ANTH 250 HEALTH OF BLACK FOLKS (3) MARSHALL
TR 1700-1815

"The Health of Black Folks" is a course in medical anthropology which will analyze the relationship between black bodies and biomedicine both historically and in the present. Co-taught by Norm Oliver, M.D—(Department of Family Medicine, UVA Health Systems), an anthropologist/physician, and Wende Marshall—a medical anthropologist, the course will offer both political economic, and post-structuralist lenses with which to interpret the individual and social health and disease of African-Americans. Selected topics include the black female body in the middle passage and slavery; the use of race in the human genome project; black bodies as research subjects for biomedical science, and the epidemic of cancer and HIV among African -Americans.

ANTH 256 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF AFRICA (3) LAVIOLETTE
MWF 1000-1050

This course engages the human landscape of modern Africa, through the close reading of a selection of monographs and African feature films. The main texts, drawn from fiction, ethnography, and social history, are taught against a backdrop of economic strategies, different forms of social organization, cultural expressions, and challenges facing modern African women and men. An edited volume on Africa will provide relevant essays to combine with and contextualize the monographs and films. We will focus on rural and urban dwellers, the elite and poor, and the forces that draw all of them together; transnational migration; and belief systems. How relationships between men and women are contextualized and negotiated is a theme found throughout the readings and films, as well as the struggle of people in different circumstances to build new relationships with older beliefs and practices, and with changing forms of government. This course does not attempt to survey all issues and peoples in modern Africa, but rather to distill and feature certain themes of especially wide relevance. This is a lecture and discussion course.

ANTH 280 INTRO. TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3) RAINVILLE
MWF 0900-0950

In this course we will examine the basic techniques, methods, theories, and goals of archaeology. We will focus on what archaeologists do, how they do it, and how archaeological research can contribute to our understanding of the human past. Topics include various theories of culture change, dating methods, excavation and survey techniques, and the reconstruction of the economy, social organization, political ideology, and religion of societies in the Old and New World. The last quarter of the class will focus on case studies in Virginia Archaeology including Native American, colonial, nineteenth-century, and African-American communities.

ANTH 290 THE CULTURE POLITICS OF AMERICAN FAMILY VALUES (3) MCKINNON
MW 1000-1050

This course explores the cultural understandings and political constrictions that shape both dominant and alternative family formations in the United States. We will read about a wide range of family formations--from the 1950s idealized "Leave It to Beaver" nuclear family to working class and upper class "dynastic" families; from single-parent to "recombined" families, from gay and lesbian families to the families created by both adoption and the new reproductive technologies; and from older "ethnic" families to those created in the more recent cultural compressions of transnational global flows of people and capital. We will also look at the manner in which the state intervenes to shape families in the United States. In what ways does the state determine whom one can marry (when, where, and why is it permitted or prohibited to marry first cousins, or same-sex partners, or racial "others"?), how many people one might marry (what happens to citizens or immigrants who are polyandrous or polygynous?), what kind of sex one may have (why are some sex acts prohibited and others not?), how one must give birth (what are the consequences of giving birth outside the supervision of a doctor?), who should or should not work (why are welfare mothers required to work and middle-class mothers admonished not to work?), who can adopt whom and why (what are the cross-racial and transnational configurations of adoption?), and the stratification of reproduction (who gets to be a mother to whose children and why?)

ANTH 300 PERSPECTIVES FOR MAJORS (1) TBA (1)
M 1200-1250

No Description available

ANTH 301 THEORY/HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY (3) MARSHALL
TR 1230-1345

No Description available

ANTH 329 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILITY (3) SHEPHERD
MW 1530-1645

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality gender, age, and class, and the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision -making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 101 or equivalent recommended as background. This is an advanced course, adding to general offerings in social organization, kinship, marriage, and gender. This course is cross-listed with women's studies.Upper level majors and non-majors

This satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 334 ECOLOGY & SOCIETY (3) DAMON
M 14:00

This course forges a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology. Its intent is to provide new insights on how human cultures both fashion and are fashioned by their environment. Topics covered will include Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, the relationship between global change and its impact on human culture, and the place of Environmentalism in contemporary culture. Special attention will be paid to the place of trees in the conceptualization of cultural systems. Ethnographic examples will be employed from the Amazon, the Pacific Islands, East and South Asia, and one or more modern societies.

ANTH 335 MUSEUMS & REPS 0F CULTURE (3) HANTMAN
T 1530-1800

This is a seminar which will offer a critical review of the role of museums and material objects in the representation of culture. The course review the literature concerning the logic and history of natural history and heritage museums in western societies and the history and politics of these museums as cultural institutions in the United States specifically. The course is a small seminar which, following a general review of the literature, will attempt to bring focus to this large topic through the study and comparison of the different histories and current debates surrounding two types of cultural heritage museums which have received a good deal of attention recently in the U.S. -- Native American museums and Jewish museums. Students enrolling in the course should be interested in pursuing one or both of those areas for class discussion and a seminar paper. The seminar paper will require students to visit and critique an existing or planned museum or participate in an ongoing study involving the University's Astor Collection of Native American art.
Permission of instructor required.

ANTH 337 POWER AND THE BODY (4) MENTORE
TR 1100-1215

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings ofsomatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of aradically different theory of power will be introduced.
Thissatisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 342 YOUTH LANGUAGE (3) SUSLAK
MW 1400-1515

This course introduces students to the comparative study of adolescence and youth culture through the lens of language use. Through readings and some modest field work the students will investigate how adolescent language use contributes to linguistic change, the status of age as a sociolinguistic variable, and the social construction of youth identity. The course will cover both formative anthropological concerns such as age sets, age grades, and rites of passage as well as current investigations into the roles that educational institutions and mass media play in the production and globalization of youth culture. It will also address a number of matters of sociolinguistic interest including slang, linguistic obsolescence, code-switching and hybrid linguistic codes.
Prerequisite: Prior course in anthropology or sociolinguistics

ANTH 350 READINGS IN ETHNOGRAPHY (3) METCALF
MWF 1000-1050

Ethnographies are the characteristic mode of presenting the result of research in social and cultural anthropology. They constitute a literary genre, and they provide the basis of whatever truth claims we make. Yet they vary enormously in style, accuracy, insight, credibility, and agenda. Consequently, it is crucial that we read them critically, appreciating both their strengths and weaknesses. This course is designed to promote such critical readings.

ANTH 353 ANTH OF EASTERN EUROPE (3) MAKAROVA
MW 1400-1515

The course explores current changes in East European societies through an examination of the practices of everyday social life. Topics include the changing cultural meanings of work and consumption, the nature of property rights and relations, family and gender, ethnicity and nationalism, religion and ritual.

ANTH 359 ETHNOPHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M 19:30 - 22:00

This course will be composed of two parts - academic and workshop. The academic part of the course will exam specific photographic works that can be thought of as "ethnographic" in some way. The materials will be drawn from documentary photography and photojournalism. Particular attention will be given to the "photo essay" as exemplified in "LIFE" Magazine. Students will give oral reports, to be written up, on selected photographers and topics. The workshop will be an ethnophotography project. Students will find an appropriate field subject to photograph. The work will be displayed in a "photo essay" form and presented to a jury. Digital photography will not be used.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and knowledge of darkroom techniques.

ANTH 362 CINEMA IN INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 1400 - 1630

A discussion of the popular and "art" cinema of India with focus on the evolution of the Indian cinemas as the indigenization of an alien art form. The course mostly involves discussion based on required readings on the historical, social and aesthetic aspects of the Indian film.

ANTH 381 ARCHAEOLOGY OF WARFARE (3) SOLOMETO
MW 1530-1645

In this course we will develop the tools necessary to evaluate the prevalence and impact of war in prehistory. We will study ethnographic data on the conduct and outcomes of war, as well as critically review anthropological theories of the origins and causes of conflict. We will then explore the classes of evidence archaeologists use to identify and characterize prehistoric war. Case studies from a variety of regions will be examined throughout the course and will allow us to assess the ability of archaeology to determine war's causes and consequences. Although the course will focus on conflict among non-state societies, we will discuss the role of war in the creation of archaic states and differences in the objectives, scale, and results of state and non-state war.

ANTH 387 ARCHAEOLOGY OF VIRGINIA (3) HANTMAN
TR 0930-1045

This course provides an overview of the insights gained into Virginia's history and prehistory through the joining of archaeological and ethnohistoric research. The course explores culture change and adaptation in Virginia (and the Chesapeake region more broadly) from the time of earliest human settlement of the region to the nineteenth century. In this vast time frame, we will focus on a number of selected topics for which people, events and sites in Virginia provide a unique perspective. These include: the origins of archaeology in America, current debate surrounding the timing and process of the initial settlement of America, the development of distinct regional polities such as the Powhatan and Monacan chiefdoms, early interaction between American Indians and Europeans and the long-term impacts of colonialism, and archaeological research on Euroamerican and African-American culture in the region.

ANTH 389 SOUTHWESTERN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) SOLOMETO
MWF 1000-1050

This class will introduce students to the prehistory and early history of the American Southwest. We will cover developments in the Southwest from the earliest PaleoIndians (11500 BP) to the arrival of the Spanish (AD 1540), and will focus on topics including the adoption of agriculture, the development of village life, the Chaco "phenomenon," Mesa Verde and the abandonment of the Four Corners, and the spread of religious "cults" in prehistory. We will also explore how archaeologists reconstruct the lives of past peoples and examine some of the current debates about Southwest prehistory in both the popular and academic literature. The rich ethnographic record of the region is introduced and the role of ethnography in understanding prehistory will be evaluated.

ANTH 401A SENIOR SEMINAR POLITICS OF PAST (3) WATTENMAKER
R 1400-1630

To many societies, the history of land and ancestors form an integral component of sociocultural identity. This makes archaeology, which seeks to construct and understand the history of cultures and regions, deeply meaningful to modern populations living in areas where research is underway. Moreover, archaeological results are sometimes viewed as having bearing on modern political conflicts over issues such as land claims. This course examines the dynamic relationship between the past and present from a number of different angles. We consider, for example, the ways in which different interest groups manipulate understanding of the past to further their political agendas, and how the understanding an archaeologist may have of his/her own culture in relation to other cultures often shapes the ways that the past is portrayed in films, museum exhibits and scholarly literature. Specific issues and case studies from various parts of the world, such as the study of Native American cemetery sites, serve to highlight some of the ways that the past and present intersect and the impact modern politics has on the way archaeologists work.

ANTH 401B AREAL PERSPECTIVES ON SOCIETY, HISTORY and 'ENVIRONMENT'IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION (3) DAMON

This course has three foci. The first, conducted through group readingassignments and reports, will locate students in an overview of"Indo-Pacific" environments, social forms and histories, and providea working context for the remainder of the course. The second, through asmall number of common readings, will engage a comparison between a placein contemporary South or East Asia, Indonesia, and Western Melanesia. Thethird portion of the course will focus on each individual student's majorresearch project and paper. Student research papers should draw from thefirst two foci but need not be confined to the South Asia, Southeast Asia,or Western Melanesia.

The course should: 1) provide anthropology majors an introductionto recent trends in 'Indo-Pacific' Studies; 2) initiate or continue,through comparative and joint study, a dialogue between the social analysescommonly practiced in Anthropology and Environmental Studies; 3) experimentwith forms of cooperative learning, attempting to blend individualinitiative into joint sharing, discovery, and learning; and, 4) provideeach student the experience of defining a major research topic andwinnowing that 'finding' into a presentable form, first orally, and then inwritten, digital form.

ANTH 401C SENIOR SEMINAR: LANGUAGE & EMOTION (3) LEFKOWITZ
W 1900-2130

This course looks at the nexus of language, culture, and emotion, exploring the field of emotion from the perspective of cultural anthropology and sociolinguistics. Specific topics covered include: emotion in the natural vs. social sciences; cross-cultural conceptions of emotion; historical change in emotion discourses; emotion as a theory of the self; the grammatical encoding of emotion in language; (mis-) communication of emotion; and emotion and the construction of racialized and gendered identities.
Limited to THIRD YEAR or FOURTH YEAR students. Priority given to Anthro majors. Course Meets: Second Writing Requirement

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 529 MYTHODOLOGY (3) WAGNER
TR 1230-1345

This course offers experience in using and understanding a very simple format for the analysis of a myth or story (any myth or story), called obviation. Following an introductory explanation, students will each select one or more myths or stories, and present and explain its obviation in class. Grading will be based on the student's expertise in doing so. Final paper plus class participation.

ANTH 533 ETHNOHISTORY & RESEARCH METHOD (3) PERDUE
TR 1400-1515

This graduate and upper-level undergraduate course offers an introduction to ethnohistory, considers some sources and methods for conducting ethnohistorical research, and applies them to an historical case study, using Albemarle County civil records and other documentary and secondary sources. Conceptions of group identity and culture, of "ethnos," based on race, ethnicity, class, or situation and of the nexus between history and anthropology will be discussed, with some consideration given to contemporary ethnohistoral case studies that address issues of contact, conflict, control, and commodification.

ANTH 541 PHONOLOGY (3) DOBRIN
TR 1100-1215

This introductory but fast-moving course teaches students with some linguistic background (1) to analyze and formally represent the organization of sound systems, and (2) to appreciate some of the central problems and methods of phonological theory. Students will apply what they are learning in weekly or biweekly problem sets.
The permission of the instructor is required.

ANTH 542 THEORIES OF LANGUAGE (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 1530-1645

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, American and European, paying attention both to theory and analytical practice, and trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the questions it asks about "language", and the fit between theory and analysis. Requirements include: two short papers (about 7 pp. each), two or three written homework assignments, an oral presentation on a scholar or school of linguistics, a take-home exam, and evidence (from classroom discussion) that you have been doing the readings.
Prerequisite: a course in linguistics or linguistic anthropology, or permission of instructor.
The permission of the instructor and a background in linguistics is required.

ANTH 543 AFRICAN LINGUISTICS (3) SAPIR
MW 1400-1515

The course will cover the classification of African languages, selected grammatical typologies, African lexicography, and examples of oral literature. Students will give presentations on these topics with respect to specific languages. The intention of the course is to investigate the considerable variety of linguistic types present in sub-Saharan Africa.
Permission of the instructor is required.

ANTH 546 TESOL: CULTURE, THEORY & METHOD (3) ROSS
TR 1230-1345

Study of the theory, problems, and methods in teaching English as a second language, with attention to relevant cultural matters and areas of general linguistics. This course is designed for students intending to specialize in the teaching of English to non-native speakers. The course will include approaches to second language learning, the discussion of learning and social problems in the multilingual classroom, the discussion of trends in the methodology of teaching, the critical examination of currently available teaching materials, and the discussion of problems in English phonology and syntax which present special problems in teaching. The approach used is eclectic and pragmatic. Students in the course are expected to be serious in their goals and to have some background in linguistics or in foreign languages. Appropriate for students applying for the Peace Corps, World Teach, the JET Program, Teach America, etc.
Permission of instructor required

ANTH 549 POETICS & POLITICS (3) FREIDRICH
T 1400-1630

Linguistic models to be drawn on include structuralism (e.g., Jakobson), ethnopoetics (e.g., Tedlock, Sherzer), formal linguistics (e.g., Miller), sociolinguistics (e.g., Hymes, Tannen), and philology (e.g., Becker, Friedrich). Issues of poetic form, the music of language, theory of tropes, socio-cultural context, language and myth, translation theory, linguistic relativism, and the intention of the poet, will be dealt with as components in a humanistic anthropological linguistics. The course introduces a global range of poetic language, with emphasis on Modern English and Russian, Native American (e.g., Quechua), and (T'ang) Chinese: the poets to be focused on correspondingly, are Emily Dickinson and Wallace Stevens, Wang Wei and Du Fu, Pushkin and Anna Akkhmatova, and Orpingalik and other Native Americans. Poetic worlds dealt with more briefly include Sumerian, Homeric Greek and Bedouin Arabic, and specific poets Sappho, Villon, Hughes, and the Gita poet. A second track is poetics and politics-e.g., the poetics of kinship, leadership and jealousy envy, activism versus hermeticism, anarchaism versus totalitarianism, and ethnic identity and conflicts.

The course is designed for persons who are excited about language, particularly its poetic, aesthetic, and political aspects. The methodological concern throughout will be to integrate linguistics, poetics and (political) anthropology.

ANTH 561 TOP: SOC JUSTICE ISS CONT INDIA (3) KHARE
TR 1100-1215

A discussion of some major social dividers along which the issues of justice/injustice run in contemporary (i.e., mostly the twentieth century) Indian culture, religion and politics. The seminar will focus on conceptions of and issues in social justice/injustice (traditional and modern) in India, especially as conflicts and claims surrounding women, children, Dalits, political protests and religious extremism are examined against recent discussions of human rights in anthropology and in India.

ANTH 565 CREOLE NARRATIVES (3) MENTORE
TR 1530-1645

We begin with the 18th and 19th century Caribbean intellectual life. Wedo so from the perspective of European imperialism and its influencesupon colonized values, slavery, race, class and color. We examine thepersistence of these major themes through the 20th century, formalized inthe battle of ideas between the elite of the mother country and theCreole upper classes. We will attempt to read the images of the Creoleself and explore their claims for a crisis of identity. We will alsofocus on the so-called spiritual character of the Creole personality. Weshall conclude by looking at the way in which the specifics of islandculture have directed nation building and how they appear to have helpedin the perpetuation of ideological and political dependencies.

ANTH 572A ANTHROPOLOGIAL RESEARCH (3) TURNER
W 1900-2130

Shamanism, healing, and the performance of ritual are experiential phenomena. The seminar deals with aspects of anthropological research concerned with the experiencing of the original sources of religion in cultures, from the point of view of the people in the field. Experience, as Victor Turner said, is anthropology's truest material; the course will be valuable for fieldworkers in the social sciences. The class will survey the works of William James, Teilhard, Carl Jung, and recent researchers to assess the state of the art in religious anthropology and to seek future discoveries.
Meets in instructor's home)

ANTH 588 ANAYTICAL METHODS OF ARCHAEOLOGY (3) NEIMAN
T 1700-1930

This course examines quantitative analytical techniques used in archaeology. Topics include regression, smoothing, correlation, measures of diversity and distance, spatial autocorrelation and Mantel methods, seriation, ordination, and clustering. The course features intensive analysis of real archaeological datasets, motivated by real archaeological problems. Highly recommended pre-requisite: an introductory course in statistics.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 702 CURRENT THEORY (3) SABEA
W 1400-1630

The course continues the agenda of ANTH 701, reviewing the development of anthropological theory from the nineteen forties to the present. Special attention is devoted to the relationship between system, structure, process, and agency as they developed in theoretical engagements with the concepts of power, practice, personhood, symbol and meaning, history, time/space/body, and political economy. The course also draws on recent debates within anthropology and across disciplinary boundaries in relation to globalization, trans-"nationalism", post-"modernism", and post-"colonialism".
The course is required of, and normally restricted to, all graduate students in their second year.

ANTH 704 RESEARCH DESIGN & METHODS (3) KHARE
M 1400-1630

The course consists of critical readings, evaluations and exercises in ethnographic research practices. Different research designs and methods are seen as emerging from and feeding back into distinct practices of ethnographic research and writing. Students critically evaluate different ethnographic research designs and methods, engage in "field" exercises, and design a summer pilot research project.

ANTH 706 RESEARCH DESIGN (3) MCKINNON
W 1530-1800

This course is designed specifically for those graduate students who will be actively applying for research grants beginning in the summer and fall of 2002. We will produce polished proposals appropriate to submit to such agencies as the Wenner-Gren Foundation, Fulbright and Fulbright-Hays, and National Science Foundation.

ANTH 711 PAPER AND PRESENTATION (3) MOST
R 1400-1630

This course is available for graduate students in their fourth semester,as they prepare to fulfill the Paper and Presentation requirement.

ANTH 729/329 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILITY (3) SHEPHERD
MW 1530-1645

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality gender, age, and class, and the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision -making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 732 AMERICAN FOLKLORE (3) PERDUE
TR 1100-1215

This course will focus primarily on Anglo-and Afro-American traditional culture and, within that domain, deal with problems of definition, origin, collection, and analysis of the main genres of folklore—narrative and song.
Note: This course is cross-listed with ENAM 885 is a graduate English course.

ANTH 735/335 MUSEUMS & REPS OF CULTURE (3) HANTMAN
T 1530-1800

Cf. above under Anth 335

ANTH 753 ANTHROPOLOGY OF EASTERN EUROPE (3) MAKAROVA
MW 1400-1515

The course explores current changes in East European societies through an examination of the practices of everyday social life. Topics include the changing cultural meanings of work and consumption, the nature of property rights and relations, family and gender, ethnicity and nationalism, and religion and ritual.

ANTH 759/359 ETHNOPHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M 1930-2200

Cf. above under Anth 359. Enrollment is limited to one graduate student.

ANTH 762 CINEMA IN INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 1400-1630

A discussion of the popular and "art" cinema of India with focus on the evolution of the Indian cinemas as the indigenization of an alien art form. The course mostly involves discussion based on required readings on the historical, social and aesthetic aspects of the Indian film.

ANTH 782 ARCHAEOLOGY II (3) WATTENMAKER
M 1900-2130

Case-studies from the Old and New Worlds provide the basis for evaluating classic and recent constructs proposed by anthropologists for the emergence and organizational dynamics of complex societies. Some specific topics covered in the class include models for the organization and collapse of ranked society, theories on state formation, urbanism, and early empires.

ANTH 790 ANTHROPOLOGY & COLONIALISTM (3) METCALFMW 1400-1515

This course addresses three broad issues: how colonial encounters shaped anthropology; how they continue to influence the discipline; and how an awareness of them should recast current fieldwork and  theory.