1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Spring 2003

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Cultural Diversity Archaeology Linguistics
211,235,236,250,290,329,
334,337,359,267,368,520,
529b, 529d,572a,589b
222,306,353,365,
370,529a,529c,557,565
281, 282, 388
89, 391, 589a
247, 333, 347
348, 504, 541, 549
Non-Western perspectives for the majors 
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern requirement)
222,306,333,362,370,529a,529c
Senior Seminars 
401A, 401B, 401C

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 211 TECHNOLOGY CULTURE, AND THE MILITARY (3) WAYLAND
TR 1230-1345

Military technology pervades our lives, from the video game-like images of the Gulf War to the Internet, first developed by the military. What, then, is the place of military technology in American culture? We will begin by considering theories about just what technology is, what culture is, and how the two relate. Does technology drive culture or vice versa? Can they be separated? We then will use this understanding to examine cross-cultural case studies of military technologies, including ancient weapons like the long bow, modern weapons like nuclear warheads and guided missiles, civilian offshoots like the Internet, and non-military uses of weapons, like heritage performances. Finally, we will consider the place of military technologies in popular media and in ongoing debates about recent military actions, including the fight against terrorism. Course requirements include three papers, plus occasional short writing assignments.

ANTH 222 BUDDHISM (3) SENEVIRATNE
TR 1400-1515

This course is about how Buddhism is practiced in different cultures. It is not about Buddhist doctrine, although a section of the course is devoted to doctrine and its historical and sociological context. We will examine ethnographic data from Buddhist cultures, mostly of the Southern or Theravada tradition, best represented by Burma, Thailand and Sri Lanka.
Course Meets: Non-Western Perspectives Requirement

ANTH 235 INTRO TO FOLKLORE (3) PERDUE
TR 1400-1515

Introduction to the materials and methods of folklore study. The course is also intended to be an introduction to folklore scholarship and to the history of the discipline. Materials used as examples in this course-narratives, songs, etc.-are drawn about equally from Anglo and African-American sources.
Course Meets Second Writing Requirement

ANTH 236 CASTANEDA & DON JUAN (3) WAGNER
TR 0930-1045

This course encourages a reconceptualization of the thought and practice in Castaneda's first nine books, through the student's active participation in lecture, discussion, readings, and especially papers written to assigned topics. A culture re-perceived through the designs of a radically different cognitive worldview is not a culture, society is not society, life is not life, and death is not death. The course offers a counter example to all that may be familiar in our world, neither believable nor unbelievable, and a chance to get a sense of how anthropologists think. Grades will be based on 3 papers.

ANTH 242 LANGUAGE AND GENDER (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 0900-0950

In many societies, differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation. We will take a cross-cultural perspective, comparing language use in the U.S. with other parts of the world, especially non-Western societies. Questions to be addressed include: How does language use reflect or construct a person's sex, gender, or sexual orientation? How do language differences, where they exist, contribute to the social construction of gender difference in our and other cultures? How do these differences affect the lives/social identities of males/females? What do "male" and "female" mean, anyway? What factors besides gender lead to language differentiation, and how do they interact with gender? Is language itself sexist? If so, what can or should be done about it? Requirements include a group project analyzing a sample of actual conversation, an individual paper, a final examination, and participation in discussion section.

ANTH 250 HEALTH OF BLACK FOLKS (3) MARSHALL
TR 1700-1750

"The Health of Black Folks" is co-taught by Norm Oliver M.D. (Department of Family Medicine, UVA Health Systems) a physician/anthropologist, and Wende Marshall, a medical anthropologist. In order to analyze and interpret the individual and social health of African Americans, the course presents a variety of topical areas on issues of black health and well-being. In the Spring 2003 semester topics will include: HIV/AIDS; reproductive issues (teen pregnancy, maternal and infant mortality, and reproductive technologies); body size/image, obesity; prisons, crime, and drugs. The issues will be considered from multidisciplinary perspectives including biomedicine, epidemiology and public health, nursing, political economy, anthropology, sociology and literature.

ANTH 267 HOW OTHERS SEE US (3) BASHKOW
MW 1100-1150

This course examines how "the West" is viewed by some of its "others" in different parts of the world. We will learn about the views of Islamist extremists, African perspectives on European colonialism, American Indian responses to Anglo-Americans, Chinese writings and films about America, images of the West in Japanese popular culture and advertising, Papua New Guinean constructions of whitemen, and critiques of the "invisibility" of whiteness in the U.S. We will seek to develop an anthropological perspective on issues of intercultural politics, the legacy of colonialism, culture and globalization, whiteness, and race. We will ask what others' views can (and can't) teach us about the anthropology of our own lives. This course is reading intensive. Requirements are participation in section discussions, midterm exams, and a final.

ANTH 281 HUMAN ORIGINS (3) HANTMAN
MWF 1000-1050

The course is intended to provide an overview and assessment of the theory, methods, and data used by anthropologists to reconstruct human physical and cultural evolution. Chronologically, the course spans the time from the initial appearance of hominids (ca 4.5 million years ago) to the period prior to the rise of urbanism and early state formation (ca 10,000 B.C.). The course is divided into three topical components: 1) a review of evolutionary theory, and the controversy surrounding that theory; 2) an in-depth survey of the data used to support current models of the pattern of human evolution, and 3) a study of the origins of modern human adaptations in the relatively recent past, with respect to uniquely human behaviors such as complex language, ritual, religion and art.

ANTH 290 THE CULTURE POLITICS OF AMERICAN FAMILY VALUES (3) McKINNON
MW 1100-1150

This course provides a broad, introductory survey of the range of cultural understandings, economic structures, and political and legal constraints that shape both dominant and alternative forms of kinship and family in the United States. The course is divided in three parts. The first examines the tension between the cultural values of biology and choice as they configure understandings about what counts as kinship (with examples drawn from dominant family ideology, adoption, the new reproductive technologies, and gay and lesbian kinship). The second investigates the economic relations that structure different class formations of family (including those of dynastic families, low wage workers, the homeless, and national and transnational migrants). The third explores the cultural understandings that give shape to the legal and political constraints on the possible forms of marriage, reproduction, and family. Here, we will consider the ways in which the state determines whom one can marry, how many people one might marry, what kind of sex one may have, how one must give birth, as well as debates about welfare, work, and adoption.

ANTH 300 PERSPECTIVES FOR MAJORS (1) TBA
M 1300-1350

This 1-hour class provides a forum for a number of not-strictly-academic perspectives on anthropology. Guest speakers will discuss various strategies for applying anthropology to post-undergraduate life, both for those interested in taking anthropology into the workforce or graduate school. Students will also explore on-grounds resources that pertain to anthropology.

ANTH 301 THEORY/HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY (4) SIHLÉ
TR 1230-1345

This course is designed for students who are majoring in anthropology. It presents a broad historical outline of major approaches and debates in the field, from the late 19th century to the present. We will attempt to understand past anthropological theories in relation to key debates of their times, while also considering their larger cultural-historical context and enduring relevance. The student must enroll in one of the discussion sections in 301D.

ANTH 306 AFRICAN INTERLOCUTORS (3) SABEA
TR 0930-1045

This course explores how a group of Africans, working primarily as assistants to Europeans interested in Africa during the late 19th and early 20th century, participated in the process of knowledge production about the Continent. We will juxtapose works (textural and otherwise) composed by African assistants to those produced by anthropologists, explorers, missionaries, and administrators to examine if there is a difference in the descriptions and interpretations about Africa and its people. Ethnographies produced by Africans will constitute our third body of texts. Our analysis will focus on an examination of who these Africans and Europeans in the categories deployed, the methodologies followed, and the assumptions embedded in the accounts. This course satisfies college second writing, non-western perspective and Anthropology majors' cultural diversity requirements.

ANTH 329 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILITY (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1100-1215

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality, gender, age, and class, and the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision-making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 101 or equivalent recommended as background. This is an advanced course, adding to general offerings in social organization, kinship, marriage, and gender. This course is cross-listed with women's studies. Studies in women and gender, and intended for a upper level majors and non-majors.

This course satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 333 NATIVE AMERICAN LITS (3) NEVINS
MW 1530-1645

In this course we will explore contemporary Native American written and oral literatures. We will be addressing the question of how Native American Literature has been defined and what part American Indian languages and cultures may have to play in this definition. Two issues will run throughout the class. First, we will question received ideas about the distinction between "oral tradition" and "literature". And secondly, we will ask how our own cultural assumptions influence the way we understand works of Native American Literature and consider the extent to which ethnographic accounts of language use and meaning within Native American contexts may change our understandings. We will compare the written work of contemporary Native American authors with examples of oral performances by persons living in Native American communities, including performances recorded by local artists, educators, anthropologists, linguists and folklorists. Our reading will be interwoven with experiences of films, audio-recordings, poetry-slams, and Web publications.

ANTH 334 ECOLOGY & SOCIETY (3) DAMON
MWF 1100-1150

This course attempts to 1) mediate the divide between the Arts and the Sciences; 2) introduce students new to anthropology to aspects of culture theory and contemporary ecological/environmental anthropology; 3) forge a synthesis between culture theory and 'historical ecology 4) provide new insights on how human cultures both fashion and are fashioned by their environments; 5) provide a seminar-like context in which we can evaluate, as anthropologists and citizens of our world, aspects of the current 'environmental' debate in our culture; and 6) facilitate independent study on environmental issues on the part of each student. The course will be taught in two parts. Lectures based on readings will occupy every Monday and Wednesday. Fridays shall be devoted to a seminar format in which we read and discuss either or both of Tim Flannery's The Future Eaters or The Eternal Frontier, and discuss individual or group projects. Writing assignments will enable this course to satisfy the 2nd Writing Requirement. If approval is obtained in time, it will also meet the non-western requirement- which it certainly does in principle. One-credit discussion sections accompany this course, led by T.A.. You are encouraged but not required to take one of these sections.

This course is designed to meet the second writing requirement.

ANTH 337 POWER AND THE BODY (4) MENTORE
TR 1100-1215

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced. This course satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 340 STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH (3) DOBRIN
R 1830-2100

The objective of this course is to help students understand the system of descriptive--as opposed to prescriptive--rules underlying English grammar, and so to better appreciate the language and become better writers, educators, and analyzers. Some time is spent early on in the course thinking critically about variation and standardization in the English language, but the bulk of the semester is spent learning the basic elements of English phonological and morphological description, examining the notion of "part of speech" from both formal and functional perspectives, and exploring basic English sentence types, common phrase and clause patterns, sentence transformations, and information-packaging strategies. No prerequisites.

ANTH 353 ANTH OF EASTERN EUROPE (3) MAKAROVA
T 1530-1800

This course explores current changes in East European societies focusing on everyday social life. Among the topics to be discussed are the changing cultural meanings of work and consumption, the nature of property rights and relations, family and gender, ethnicity and nationalism, religion and ritual.

ANTH 359 ETHNOPHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M 1930-2200

This course will be composed of two parts - academic and workshop. The academic part of the course will exam specific photographic works that can be thought of as "ethnographic" in some way. The materials will be drawn from documentary photography and photojournalism. Particular attention will be given to the "photo essay" as exemplified in "LIFE" Magazine. Students will give oral reports, to be written up, on selected photographers and topics. The workshop will be an ethnophotography project. Students will find an appropriate field subject to photograph. The work will be displayed in a "photo essay" form and presented to a jury. Digital photography will not be used.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and knowledge of darkroom techniques.

ANTH 362/762 CINEMA IN INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 1400-1630

Examines the nature and evolution of the Indian film. Relates the film to Indian culture and more specifically to the tradition of Sanskrit drama and aesthetic theory. Examines the major turning points in the history of the Indian cinema, and the distinction between commercial and "art" cinema. Classroom time is devoted to discussion of reading and prescribed films which students view on their own.

ANTH 365 ASIAN-AMERICAN IDENTITY (3) YOUNG
MWF 0900-0950

History of immigration from East Asia to the U.S. and American social and legislative responses to immigration. The immigrant communities' varying reinterpretations of their cultures of origin as they have adapted to American society. The interplays of the bicultural situation as seen in self-reflections. Asian-American arts as part of this self-reflection and as a force in American culture. Emphasis is on relations between generations in family culture, on types of community, and the role of ethnic communities in American economy. We inquire into the meaning of multiculturalism in America through this study, into its functioning and its effects on American attitudes, behavior, and politics. The East Asian groups studied are the Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean and Vietnamese.

ANTH 368 COLONIZATIONS OF THE AMERICAN WEST (3) CARTER/LAURIA
MW 1100-1150

This course examines the American West as a series of overlaid colonizations beginning with the initial migrations of people into the North American Continent and continuing through the present day. You will be exposed to the diversity of peoples, cultures, and environments of the American West and provoked to think critically about the West and its multiple colonizations. A focus on colonization will help us realize these goals by highlighting the movements of different peoples across the land, their adaptation to it and alterations of it, and their often violent confrontations with earlier occupants. Throughout, we will pay attention to how race, class, gender, and ethnicity conditioned peoples' experiences. The complexities of colonial encounters are a central topic in anthropological research, but Anthropology itself has been labeled a colonialist enterprise. We acknowledge both roles by looking not only at national, cultural, environmental, and religious colonizations, but also at intellectual colonization of the American West-primarily the rise of American anthropology.

ANTH 370/770 CONTEMPORARY INDIA (3) KHARE
TR 1100-1215

Reading and discussion of selected major cultural, religious and political changes in India since independence. The focus will be on major urban centers for changing (a) family, marriage and caste relationships; (b) middle-class Indians and religious/ethnic violence; (c) Hindu religiosity and religious nationalism; (d) positions and demands of women and Dalits (of Untouchables); and (e) roles of the Indian mass media, particularly television and movies.

ANTH 378 CHIEFS AND CHIEFDOM (3) PLOG
MW 1530-1645

A comparative study of the development of sociopolitical complexity around the world during the prehistoric era, with emphasis on the type of organization often referred to as "chiefdoms." Theoretical literature will be reviewed and discussed during the first 3-4 weeks, followed by consideration of series of case studies focusing on Africa, the American Midwest and Southeast, Panama, Polynesia, and Mexico.

Click here for course website.

ANTH 379 NEW DIRECTIONS IN QUANTITATIVE METHODS I (5) PLOG/MOST
TR 0930-1045

This course provides an introduction to the use of analytical procedures, database applications, statistics, and quantitative methods in anthropology. Analytical techniques used to generate, describe, and analyze archaeological and anthropological data sets are emphasized but experience has shown that students in sociology, psychology, and nursing have little problem applying the statistical methods learned to their own data sets. The course focuses on research design, field and lab methods, database construction, hypothesis testing, probability and sampling, and univariate statistics. No prior knowledge of statistics is necessary; background in anthropology, archaeology, or a related field is required.

ANTH 384 ARCHAEOLOGY ANCIENT NEAR EAST (3) WATTENMAKER
TR 1530-1645

This course is an introduction to the prehistory of the Near East, focusing mainly on the period from ca. 9000 to 2500 BC. Through both lectures and discussion, we will examine the archaeological evidence for the origins of food production (the domestication of plants and animals), the earliest village communities, the origins of social ranking, nomadism, the rise of state societies and the first cities, and the origins of writing systems. Regions of study include the Levant, Anatolia, Egypt, and Greater Mesopotamia. Emphasis will be placed on evaluating hypotheses on cultural organization and change in the ancient Near East, as well as comparison of cultural developments in different parts of the Near East. Questions of interest to anthropologists working in other parts of the world, such as the origins of the state, will be examined in light of findings from the Near East.

ANTH 385 MATERIAL CULTURE STUDIES (3) UPTON
R 1530-1800

This course is designed to acquaint undergraduate students with the basic concepts and practices in the study of material culture. Material culture encompasses everything we make or do - the food we eat, the clothes we wear, the houses we occupy, the art we hang on our walls, even the ways we modify our bodies. In this course we will investigate questions of:

  • Making: How are particular kinds of objects designed and fabricated? How are aesthetic concepts, ritual knowledge, and craft practices passed from one maker to another?
  • Using: How do artifacts affect the ways we relate to one another spatially, the ways we accomplish necessary tasks, the ways we experience our world?
  • Meaning: What can material culture tell us about ideas of self, gender, nation, ethnicity, community, life, death, the transcendent?
  • Thinking: What methods can we use to study material culture? What kinds of questions can we ask about all artifacts and issues are specific to the study of one genre or another - clothing, for example, or ceramics or architecture? In what ways do our methods of collecting and analyzing objects affect our thinking about them?

In the course of our investigation, we will have occasion to examine and think about a wide variety of objects, including clothing, food, works of art, musical instruments, buildings, landscapes, cemeteries and gravemarkers, and body modification from a variety of cultures and subcultures (primarily but not exclusively in the United States).

Class meetings will consist primarily of reading, discussion, and hands-on study of artifacts, with occasional lectures. We meet once a week in a single two-and-one-half-hour block to allow us to make frequent and active use of the University's and the city of Charlottesville's material-culture resources. In addition, there will be two required Saturday field trips.

ANTH 401A SR SEMINAR: POLITICS OF PAST (3) WATTENMAKER
W 1400-1630

To many societies, the history of land and ancestors forms an integral component of sociocultural identity. This makes archaeology, which seeks to construct and understand the history of cultures and regions, deeply meaningful to modern populations living in areas where research is underway. Moreover, archaeological results are sometimes viewed as having bearing on modern political conflicts over issues such as land claims. This course examines the dynamic relationship between the past and present from a number of different angles. We consider, for example, the ways in which different interest groups manipulate understanding of the past to further their political agendas, and how the understanding an archaeologist may have of his/her own culture in relation to other cultures often shapes the ways that the past is portrayed in films, museum exhibits and scholarly literature. Specific issues and case studies from various parts of the world, such as the study of Native American cemetery sites, serve to highlight some of the ways the past and present intersect and the impact modern politics has on the way archaeologists work.

ANTH 401B SR SEMINAR: MEDICINE, POWER, & COLONIALISM (3) MARSHALL
W 1600-1830

This senior seminar will examine the ways in which western medicine was/is constitutive of the West's colonial/postcolonial project, with particular attention to how the production of knowledge about Others (and therefore of self/West) is produced through the prisms of medicine and science. The seminar will include discussion of syphilis, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis (among other epidemics) in the colonial/postcolonial world, historically and in the present. Course Meets Second Writing Requirement

ANTH 401C SR SEMINAR: INDO-PACIFIC SOCIETY (3) DAMON
M 1900-2130

This course has three foci. The first, conducted through group reading assignments and reports, will locate students in an overview of "Indo-Pacific" environments, social forms and histories, and provide a working context for the remainder of the course. The second, through a small number of common readings, will engage a comparison between a place in contemporary South or East Asia, Indonesia, and Western Melanesia. The third portion of the course will focus on each individual student's major research project and paper. Student research papers should draw from the first two foci but need not be confined to the South Asia, Southeast Asia, or Western Melanesia. Demonstrating an ability to pull digitalized photography, graphs or maps into class presentations and the final paper will be part of the course requirements.

The course should: 1) provide anthropology majors an introduction to recent trends in 'Indo-Pacific' Studies; 2) initiate or continue, through comparative and joint study, a dialogue between the social analyses commonly practiced in Anthropology and Environmental Studies; 3) experiment with forms of cooperative learning, attempting to blend individual initiative into joint sharing, discovery, and learning; and 4) provide each student the experience of defining a major research topic and winnowing that 'finding' into a presentable form, first orally, and then in written, digital form.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 520 THE HISTORY OF KINSHIP THEORY (3) MCKINNON
W 18:00-20:30

This course explores the development of kinship studies in anthropology from 19th century evolutionary theorists through the classic kinship studies of the 20th century--including British descent theory, French alliance theory, and American cultural theory--to more recent developments relating to "house societies" and "cultures of relatedness." The course is a critical appreciation of a body of literature that has been central to the development of anthropological theory for over 100 years. It seeks to understand not only the ways in which this "scientific" theory was culturally constituted but also the analytic consequences of its particular cultural and historical configurations.

ANTH 529A ETHNOGRAPHY OF PROPHETIC MOVEMENT (3) BASHKOW
MW 1400-1515

This graduate seminar introduces students to Melanesian ethnography and historical anthropology through an intensive study of the prophetic movement, the "Taro Cult," which arose among Orokaiva peoples on the island of New Guinea in about 1912. At the center of the Taro Cult were ecstatic trance rituals in which the spirits of personified taro plants inspired prophets with new knowledge, precepts, prohibitions, gardening techniques, dances, and rituals. Taro cultism responded to Orokaiva people's new experience of colonialism by revitalizing tradition while simultaneously offering a "veiled" discourse that covertly expressed interpretations of the situation of colonial domination in terms that opened up novel possibilities for pan-Orokaiva community and identity. In the course, we will consider how the Taro Cult can be understood both as a response to colonialism and as an outgrowth of the indigenous culture, and we will use its ethnography to explore the nature of cultural resistance to colonialism, revitalization, cargo cultism, and "avoidance protest." We will examine how the Cult has been interpreted in different ways by Orokaiva and foreign scholars at different moments of colonial and post-colonial history, reflecting an evolving politics of history of the colonial past. At the course's end, we will look at recent analogs of the cult in the context of economic development projects, and we will learn about the transformation of indigenous food symbolism under the influence of increasing commodity food imports. The course is open to advanced undergraduates.

ANTH 529B ANTHROPOLOGY OF AESTHETICS (3) SAPIR
MW 1400-1515

We take as a premise that aesthetic judgment is a universal form of judgment, as universal as ethical, moral, or pragmatic judgments. We also take as a premise that aesthetic judgments are made constantly and are by no means confined to what we call Art. With these two premises in mind we will consider various Western theories of aesthetics and then proceed to see how they might apply to the aesthetics of every day life in the West and elsewhere. The art of spitting as with a baseball pitcher or as an emphatic in Turkana discourse will be given the same treatment as Olympia and the Changing of the Night Watch. This course is run as a seminar and students will give presentations on selected topics.

ANTH 529C TIBETAN RELIGION (3) SIHLÉ
M 1530-1800

The analysis of Tibetan religion will be organized according to a number of important anthropological issues: Geertzian and other perspectives on religion and society, issues of religion and politics, ritual, symbolism, etc. The course materials will be complemented by selected readings of more textual studies (works on religious history, doctrine and ritual, translations of biographies of religious masters, etc.). The anthropological study of Tibetan religion is a recent academic tradition, with both geographical and political circumstances still being major obstacles to ethnographic fieldwork. Its subject matter, and notably the Tantric component of Tibetan religion, show considerable complexity. To a certain extent, the anthropologist is compelled to be a specialist of textual culture at the same time. This sub-discipline can be said to be still striving towards intellectual maturity, and this seminar intends to be a contribution to such an endeavor. The requirements for this course include two shorter essays and one longer term paper.
This course satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 529D MYTHODOLOGY (3) WAGNER
TR 1230-1345

This course offers experience in using and understanding a very simple format for the analysis of a myth or story (any myth or story), called obviation. Following an introductory explanation, students will each select one or more myths or stories, and present and explain its obviation in class. Grading will be based on the student's expertise in doing so final paper plus class participation.

ANTH 544 MORPHOLOGY (3) DOBRIN
R 1530-1800

This course provides an overview of recent morphological theory, focusing on recurring themes that have arisen as the subfield has sought to find its place within the generative paradigm. The issues we will cover fall mainly into two broad groupings: those that relate morphology to phonology (such as allomorphy and word formation), and those that relate it to syntax (e.g., inflection, distinguishing compounds from phrases). Throughout the course we will be mindful of whether there is such a thing as pure morphology, a core set of phenomena having to do with word structure which motivates a distinct component of grammar. Students will do weekly or biweekly problem sets and give a class presentation on a common morphological category or means of formal expression.

ANTH 546 TESOL: CULTURE, THEORY & METHOD (3) ROSS
TR 1230-1345

Study of the theory, problems, and methods in teaching English as a second language, with attention to relevant cultural matters and areas of general linguistics. This course is designed for students intending to specialize in the teaching of English to non-native speakers. The course will include approaches to second language learning, the discussion of learning and social problems in the multilingual classroom, the discussion of trends in the methodology of teaching, the critical examination of currently available teaching materials, and the discussion of problems in English phonology and syntax which present special problems in teaching. The approach used is eclectic and pragmatic. Students in the course are expected to be serious in their goals and to have some background in linguistics or in foreign languages. Appropriate for students applying for the Peace Corps, World Teach, the JET Program, Teach for America, etc. (Permission of instructor required)

ANTH 549 DISCOURSE ANALYSIS (3) DANZIGER
W 1400-1630

This course offers a linguistic approach to the study of multi-party speech events that are longer than the single sentence. We view these as vehicles through which such central issues as identity, subjectivity and power are negotiated in human societies. Topics to be covered include: methods in the documentation of discourse (including ethical issues), conversational analysis, linguistic pragmatics, narrative analysis, and critical discourse analysis. The course takes a hands-on approach in which students prepare their own recordings, transcriptions and analyses of naturally occurring speech events. Students will prepare commentaries on readings, and complete a final project for presentation to the class.
Prerequisite: An introductory course in Linguistics: ANTH 540, LNGS 701, or LNGS 325.

ANTH 557 RECENT ETHNOLOGY IN CHINA (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1400-1615

In this seminar we will read approximately one ethnography every week, selected to represent the most recent work exploring issues of post-reform rural and urban life, gender, ethnicity and religion in China. Requirements include weekly written reading responses, preparation of discussion questions, active seminar participation, an annotated bibliography, and a 20-page term paper.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 363 or instructor permission.

ANTH 565 CREOLE NARRATIVES (3) MENTORE
TR 1530-1645

This course sets as its principal task -- within the parameters of Caribbean ethnography -- an examination of social being as narrative. Caribbean stories about cultural identity become the analyzable material not only for understanding these regionally and historically distinct societies, but also for forming an anthropology of personhood. We will move through the plots of such characters as Olaudah Equiano, the slave trade, the peasant village, race, nationalism, mimesis, masculinity, femininity, motherhood, and healing. The idea will be to confront and understand (and not be threatened by) the various intertwined identities made vital in the Antilles.

ANTH 572A ENERGY, POWER, & SPIRITS IN THE HEALING PROCESS (3) TURNER
W 1900-2130

The seminar examines the terms, "energy," "power," and "spirits," or their equivalents, used by different societies to refer to the sources of nonmedical healing. The seminar pays attention to the experiences of the healer and the healee, which are real to them. We will begin to weigh up the attempts to describe these subtle phenomena, relating them to a real and spiritual dimension of human nature. It is becoming recognized that the most ancient experiential phenomena of religion lie in shamanism, in healing, the sense of human, animal, and place spirits, in a sense of a great spirit, the sense of oneness, and the performance of ritual. The seminar deals with aspects of anthropological research concerned with the experiencing of these original sources of religion in present day cultures, from the point of view of the inhabitants of the field. Experience, as Victor Turner said, is anthropology's truest material. The class will bring in examples from personal fieldwork undertaken in the local area and further a field. Texts will derive from works of recent anthropological researchers who have shared experiences of healing and from the transcriptions of healers about their work and their initial call to the craft.

The course meets Non-Western Perspectives (Meets in instructor's home)

ANTH 587 ZOOARCHAEOLOGY (3) WATTENMAKER
W 1530-1800

This laboratory course provides students with the background and skills needed to analyze animal bones from archaeological sites. Emphasis will be placed on the potential of faunal analysis for contributing to anthropological issues, such as the domestication of animals, political economy, the origins of the state, and the organization of urban economies. Class sessions will include lectures and laboratory work. Lectures will include a critical survey of the methodological approaches and techniques used to address anthropological questions through the analysis of faunal remains. Topics such as research design, strategies of field collection of faunal remains, and data analysis and interpretation will be covered. In the laboratory, students will learn to identify faunal remains to species, to determine age and sex of species, to distinguish between wild and domestic animals, to recognize bone pathologies, and to observe cultural modification of bones, such as butchering marks. The course requirements include a series of short papers based on laboratory analysis of archaeological faunal remains, and a final paper. The final paper will involve the analysis of a small archaeological collection of faunal remains from the ancient city of Kazane (Turkey), focusing on a particular time period (e.g. prehistoric, early historic) and part of the site (e.g. house, palace). Each student will share his or her findings with the rest of the class. We will compare and contrast results, and discuss implications of findings. Cooperation and discussion between students is strongly encouraged.

This course is intended for advanced undergraduate Anthropology or Archaeology majors, advanced undergraduate students in related fields such as Zoology and Classics, and graduate students in Anthropology (or related fields such as Architecture/Historical Archaeology) with a specialization in archaeology.

ANTH 589A ISSUES IN HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY (3) NEIMAN
M 1630-1900

In this seminar we will explore emerging theoretical, methodological, and historical issues in the archaeology of the early-modern Atlantic world. Topics include colonization and resistance, economic strategies in the context of the Atlantic markets, household social dynamics, slavery, ethnicity, and consumption. North America and the Caribbean will be our primary geographical foci.

The course Meets Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 589B THE PUBLIC AND THE CITY (3) UPTON
R 1530-1800

This seminar will explore ideas and forms of urban public space and public life in their many manifestations - civic, social, and religious, formal and informal, official and unofficial, licit and illicit - primarily but not exclusively in the United States. Our focus is on the ideas of citizenship and community: what does it mean to be a part of a public? Who has a voice and who does not? Our goal is to understand the ways that public spaces foster inclusion and exclusion in urban public life and, conversely, how concepts of the public shape urban space. We will read historical and theoretical works on the idea of the public, and examine works of architecture, art, and planning designed to be public sites, as well as others never explicitly intended as public places but which have been co-opted to public use. The readings will be drawn from a wide range of disciplines, including anthropology; geography; architectural, urban, art, and social history; material-culture studies; literature; and cultural criticism. 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 702 CURRENT THEORY (3) SABEA
R 1900-2130

The course continues the agenda of ANTH 701, reviewing the development of anthropological theory from the nineteen forties to the present. Special attention is devoted to the relationship between system, structure, process, and agency as they developed in theoretical engagements with the concepts of power, practice, personhood, symbol and meaning, history, time/space/body, and political economy. The course also draws on recent debates within anthropology and across disciplinary boundaries in relation to globalization, trans-"nationalism," post-"modernism," and post-"colonialism."
The course is required of, and normally restricted to, all graduate students in their first year.

ANTH 704 RESEARCH DESIGN & METHODS (3) KHARE
M 1400-1630

A comparative discussion of "classic" and new ethnographic research practices and writing. Different research designs, field strategies and "human variables" will be examined in selected current ethnographic writing practices and anthropological representation. Class exercises will include devising "mock ethnographic strategies" for critically reviewing specific writing styles (including ethnopoetics of self-location, gender, and power), and for designing better the summer pilot research projects.

ANTH 708 ADV ARCH METHODS & THEORY (3) HANTMAN
T 1900-2130

An intensive investigation of current research in the principles, methods, findings, and analysis of anthropological archaeology.

ANTH 711 PAPER AND PRESENTATION (3) LAVIOLETTE
R 1530-1800

This workshop is for second-year graduate students in Anthropology preparing their M.A.-qualifying Paper and Presentation. Students circulate and discuss their P-and-P ideas, abstracts, and drafts among the class members, and practice their presentations, all of which helps to strengthen the project being supervised by individual P-and-P committees. The course grade is based on attendance, participation, and professionalism, and thus the course cannot be audited.

ANTH 729/329 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILITY (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1100-1215

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality, gender, age, and class, and the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision-making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 732 AMERICAN FOLKLORE (3) PERDUE
TR 1100-1215

This course will focus primarily on Anglo-and Afro-American traditional culture and, within that domain, deal with problems of definition, origin, collection, and analysis of the main genres of folklore-narrative and song.
Note: This course is cross-listed with ENAM 885.

ANTH 737 POWER AND THE BODY (4) MENTORE
TR 1100-1215

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced.

ANTH 753/353 ANTHROPOLOGY OF EASTERN EUROPE (3) MAKAROVA
T 1530-1800

The course explores current changes in East European societies through an examination of the practices of everyday social life. Topics include the changing cultural meanings of work and consumption, the nature of property rights and relations, family and gender, ethnicity and nationalism, and religion and ritual.

ANTH 759/359 ETHNOPHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
W 1930-2200

Please see the course description for ANTH 359. The course is limited to one graduate student.

ANTH 762/362 CINEMA IN INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 1400-1630

Examines the nature and evolution of the Indian film. Relates the film to Indian culture and more specifically to the tradition of Sanskrit drama and aesthetic theory. Examines the major turning points in the history of the Indian cinema, and the distinction between the commercial and "art" cinema. Classroom time is devoted to discussion of reading and prescribed films which students view on their own.

ANTH 770/370 CONTEMPORARY INDIA (3) KHARE
TR 1100-1215

Reading and discussion of selected major cultural, religious and political changes in India since independence. The focus will be on major urban centers for changing (a) family, marriage and caste relationships; (b) middle class Indians and religious/ethnic violence; (c) Hindu religiosity and religious nationalism; (d) positions and demands of women and Dalits (of Untouchables); and (e) roles of the Indian mass media, particularly television and movies.

ANTH 778/378 CHIEFS AND CHIEFDOM (3) PLOG
MW 1530-1645

A comparative study of the development of sociopolitical complexity around the world during the prehistoric era, with emphasis on the type of organization often referred to as "chiefdoms." Theoretical literature will be reviewed and discussed during the first 3-4 weeks, followed by consideration of series of case studies focusing on Africa, the American Midwest and Southeast, Panama, Polynesia, and Mexico.

ANTH 779/379 NEW DIRECTIONS IN QUANTITATIVE METHODS 1 (3) PLOG/MOST
TR 0930-1045

This course provides an introduction to the use of analytical procedures, database applications, statistics, and quantitative methods in anthropology. Analytical techniques used to generate, describe, and analyze archaeological and anthropological data sets are emphasized but experience has shown that students in sociology, psychology, and nursing have little problem applying the statistical methods learned to their own data sets. The course focuses on research design, field and lab methods, database construction, hypothesis testing, probability and sampling, and univariate statistics. No prior knowledge of statistics is necessary; background in anthropology, archaeology, or a related field is required.