1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Spring 2005

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics
228,236,268,317,319,329,331
334,336,337,529A,529B,572A
222,257,316,362,367,
529C,556,565,577
282,380,389,394 240,247,348,
544,546,547
Non-Western perspectives for the majors 
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern requirement)
101,222,257,316,362,367,529C, 556,565,577
Senior Seminars 
401A, 401B, 401C

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 101 INTRO TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3) BALTALI
TR 0930-1045

This is a broad introductory course covering race, language, and culture, both as intellectual concepts and as political realities. Topics include race and culture as explanations of human affairs, the relationship of language to thought, cultural diversity and cultural relativity, and cultural approaches to current crises.
Meets non-western perspectives requirement.

ANTH 222 BUDDHISM (3) SENEVIRATNE
TR 1400-1515

This course is not on the Buddhist doctrine but about how Buddhism is practiced in different Buddhist societies with special reference to the Buddhist kingdoms of South and Southeast Asia. However, it introduces the basic concepts of Buddhism and places it in the historical and ideological context of its origin in ancient India.

ANTH 228 INTRODUCTION. TO MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) CHAPPLE
TR 1100-1215

The suffering body is inevitable in human experience, but how suffering is interpreted varies across cultures. Similarly, notions of health and methods of healing vary across cultures and time. The point of this course, which introduces medical anthropology, is to contextualize suffering, healing and health. The course is organized thematically around a critical humanist approach along with perspectives from political economy and social constructionism. The aim of the course is to proved a broad understanding of the relationship between culture, healing (including biomedicine), health and political power.

ANTH 236 CASTANEDA & DON JUAN (3) WAGNER
TR 0930-1045

The six books of Carlos Castaneda represent what is perhaps an anthropological ideal--a world in which the native's concepts of power, sorcery, and transformation are "real" rather than the social systems, adaptations, and symbolic processes generally used to explain them. They are not ethnography; in his latest preface Castaneda prefers to treat them as "autobiography." Yet they can be used very effectively to illustrate a wide range of concept in anthropology and traditional religions, which is what this course is all about. It will not teach you to fly--it may teach you to write--but it will hopefully help you to understand how anthropologists think. The course will be given in an open seminar format, with discussion encouraged. Grades will be based on 3 papers.

ANTH 240 LANGUAGE & CULTURE (3) CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 1000-1050

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how linguistic data can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communications. Satisfies the non-western perspectives requirement.

ANTH 247 REFLECTIONS OF EXILE (3) LEFKOWITZ
MWF 1100-1150

This course looks historically and comparatively at Jewish languages and the communities in which they have been used. We will explore general questions of the relationships among sociocultural groups, their languages (or language varieties), and the literatures they produce by reading about Yiddish, Ladino, Judeo-Arabic, and Hebrew from literary, cultural, and historical perspectives. No prior knowledge of these languages is required.

ANTH 257 TRADITIONAL HEALING AND WESTERN MEDICINE IN AFRICA (3) TERNI
MW 1000-1050

Shamans. Witch-doctors. Mediums. Con artists. Soul-stealers. Visionaries. Cannibals. Are these words for the village sangomas and inyangas of South Africa? Or for the University-trained doctors in their long white coats? Through a variety of sources and media, this course explores the full spectrum of healing practice in Africa. We will pay particular attention to cultural constructions of "illness" and how people make decisions to seek care. We will also study the ways in which indigenous healing practices both resist and augment European treatments, and the political dimensions of 'health.'

ANTH 268 READING THE NEW YORK TIMES (3) HANDLER
MW 1400-1450

An analysis of contemporary culture as represented in a major American newspaper. Articles from the daily paper will be supplemented by relevant readings by anthropologists and other culture critics.

ANTH 282 RISE OF CIVILIZATION (3) WATTENMAKER
TR 1400-1515

In this course we will focus on the emergence and collapse of complex societies in both the Old (Middle East and Egypt) and New (Prehistoric Valley of Mexico, Aztec Society, and Maya Lowlands) Worlds. We will combine archaeological, textual and ethnographic evidence to understand the establishment of villages at the end of the Ice Age, the origin of the first cities, and their abandonment. Topics discussed include the problematic concept of "civilization," origins of agriculture and its effects on society, the shift from egalitarian societies to those with social ranking, the establishment of cities, the beginnings of writing, and the collapse of complex societies. Please note that the course meets for 50 minutes M/W with a third, obligatory discussion section.

ANTH 301 THEORY/HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY (4) DAMON
TR 1230-1345

Designed for students majoring in anthropology, this course reviews the history of anthropology from the late 18th century to the present. It explores both the development of theory and the discipline's experience in learning about the human condition in specific places across the globe. Mindful that anthropology is itself a social process, developing through certain times and distinctive to specific places, the course will consider both the discipline's generated content and the role proto- and contemporary anthropologists have played in their societies. Student must enroll in one of the discussion sections, 301D. These sections will be partly devoted to considering assigned class readings and lectures in a seminar format; but they will also be organized so that specific sets of students will focus on anthropology's contributions to the understanding of specific regions of the world, the Americas, Euro-Asia, Africa, and the Indo-Pacific. One question to be addressed here is how we make the discipline's contributions relevant to our roles as citizens of the world. Sets of students will also be responsible for reading and producing a collective critical review of the biography of a distinctive contributor to the record of anthropology, e.g., Morgan, Malinowski, Benedict, Leach. This course meets the second writing requirement.

ANTH 316 CONTEMPORARY HINDUISM (3) KHARE
TR 1100-1215

A discussion of contemporary (mostly post-independence) Hinduism by studying the interrelated changes and challenges modern India poses in (a) traditional Hinduism, (b) the family-kinship-caste world, (c) the city and middle-class Hindu life, (d) religious worship and its places, (e) Hindu religious politics, and (f) "Virtual Hinduism" on the modern media and Internet.

ANTH 317 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) SAPIR
TR 1400-1515

This course is concerned with visual representation in Anthropology as it has been practiced and might be practiced. This year it is divided primarily into two major topics: the use film in anthropology and of still photography in the parallel discipline of documentary photography and photojournalism. Film (and now video) has played a seminal role in Visual Anthropology with many classic films starting with Robert Flaherty's 'Nanook of the North' and running up to recent work of such filmmakers as David MacDougall. The second half of the course will be devoted to aspects of documentary photography starting with the early work of Jakob Riis and Lewis Hine through the great period of the FSA and followed by the importance of LIFE magazine and the street photographers of the 60s and 70s. Students will divide up into teams that will be responsible for giving oral presentations covering specific films and photographic topics.

ANTH 319 RELIGION AND SOCIAL CHANGE (3) FISHER
TR 0930-1045

From changing urban landscapes in 19th-century America, through Melanesian cargo cults, to the rise of Islamic fundamentalism today, religion has often played a formative role in shaping, facilitating, and, in some cases, resisting social and cultural change. In this course, we will analyze this process in a variety of historical and ethnographic settings. Particular attention will be given to the role of religious belief and action among those displaced by rapid social and economic shifts in the wake of globalization. One term paper, two shorter papers, and active class participation are required. Course meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 329 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILITY (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1230-1345

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality gender, age, and class, and the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision -making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 101 or equivalent recommended as background. This is an advanced course, adding to general offerings in social organization, kinship, marriage, and gender. This course is cross-listed with SWAG, and is recommended for majors and upper-level students. This satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 331 TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION (3) HO
MW 1100-1150

This course will examine the socio-historical trends, political-economic conditions, cultural implications, and both individual and community responses to human trafficking, labor migration, and refugee/asylum- seeking on four distinct communities of Chinese, Japanese-Brazilian, Punjabi-Mexican, and Sudanese transnational migrants. Additional readings on different immigrant groups in the United States, Europe and Asia will provide students with additional comparative context to better understand the complexity of transnational migrant experiences.

ANTH 334 ECOLOGY AND SOCIETY (3) DAMON
MWF 1000-1050

This course attempts to 1) mediate the divide between the Arts and the Sciences; 2) introduce students new to anthropology aspects of culture theory and contemporary ecological/environmental anthropology; 3) forge a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology;4) provide new insights on how human cultures both fashion and are fashioned by their environments; 5) provide a seminar-like context in which we can evaluate, as anthropologists and citizens of our world, aspects of the current environmental debate in our culture; and 6) facilitate independent study on environmental issues on the part of each student. Although case studies will be drawn from throughout the world, there will be a stress on the social systems and environments triangulating South Asia, East Asia, and Australia.

The course will be taught in two parts. Lectures based on readings will occupy every Monday and Wednesday. Fridays shall be devoted to a Seminar' format in which the class collectively discusses and each student reads one of three books, Tim Flannery's The Future Eaters or The Eternal Frontier, and Ross Gelbspan's Boiling Point. One credit discussion sections accompany this course, led by its T.A. You are encouraged but not required to take one of these sections. Writing assignments will enable this course to satisfy the 2nd Writing Requirement.

ANTH 336 LIFE HISTORY AND ORAL HISTORY (3) PERDUE
TR 1400-1515

This course is focused primarily on practical experience in the field situation and training in the creation of written life histories from transcriptions of recorded oral interviews conducted by the student. It will also present and discuss theoretical issues involved in the interpretation and use of life history and oral history material. This course is cross-listed in the English Department as ENAM 336, Life History and Oral History. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 337 POWER AND THE BODY (3) MENTORE
TR 1230-1630

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced. This satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 348 LANGUAGE AND PREHISTORY (3) DANZIGER
MW 1000-1050

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics--the study of how languages change over time--and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider for example the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. Examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan languages of Central America, and will include discussion of pre-Columbian Mesomerican writing systems and their ongoing decipherment. Over the semester, students will be responsible for completing several homework assignments bases on course content, presenting results of their own research into a particular case study, and a final exam.

ANTH 359 ETHNOPHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M 1930-2200

This course will be composed of two parts: academic and workshop. The academic part of the course will exam specific photographic works that can be thought of as "ethnographic" in some way. The materials will be drawn from documentary photography and photojournalism. Particular attention will be given to the "photo essay" as exemplified in "LIFE" Magazine. Students will give oral reports, to be written up, on selected photographers and topics. The workshop will be an ethnophotography project. Students will find an appropriate field subject to photograph. The work will be displayed in a "photo essay" form and presented to a jury. Digital photography will not be used. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and knowledge of darkroom techniques. Open to nine undergraduates and one graduate student.

ANTH 362 CINEMA IN INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 1400-1630

A discussion of the social, historical and aesthetic aspects of the world's largest film industry. Both the popular "Bollywood" film and the "art film" that exists outside it are discussed. The course is open to both graduate and undergraduate students.

ANTH 367 TIBETAN AND HIMALAYAN SOCIETIES (3) SIHLÉ
TR 1530-1645

This course aims at providing a balanced, anthropological outlook on a complex and culturally diverse area, on which the West has massively projected its own fantasies: that of the Tibetan and Himalayan societies. One aim of this course will be to relate Tibetan and Himalayan ethnography to larger issues and debates of the discipline ­ something which this still recent field of research is only starting to achieve. The main topics investigated shall include ethnicity, social and political organization, and religious forms.

ANTH 380 CHACO CANYON SEMINAR (3) MOST/PLOG
F 0930-1200

A review and critique of current approaches to understanding the development and colla       pse of Chaco Canyon and the broader Chacoan World of the Four Corners region of the American Southwest. In particular we will focus on developments during the 9th through 12th centuries. Recent monographs and articles will be emphasized during class discussions, although we will also review the history of Chacoan studies and the variety of perspectives that have been offered to understand culture change. Three or four experts on the Chaco region will likely participate in some of the weekly seminars. Students will be expected to prepare a major research paper and be thoroughly prepared for class meetings each week.

ANTH 389 SOUTHWESTERN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) PLOG
TR 0930-1045

An examination of the prehistory of the American Southwest (New Mexico, Arizona, southern Utah and Colorado) with an emphasis on the origin and development of Pueblo culture in the Four Corners region. Topics will include the origin of agriculture, the establishment of village-based organization, demographic change including the major population declines of the 12th and 13th centuries, conflict/warfare, and ritual change. Particular areas of concern will be the Chaco Canyon region of northwestern New Mexico, Mesa Verde, and the Salt-Gila River Valleys.

ANTH 394 ARCHAEOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO SLAVERY IN THE CHESAPEAKE (3) NEIMAN
W 1700-1930

This course explores how archaeological evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of slavery and the slave-based society that evolved in the Chesapeake from the 17th through early-19th centuries. The course covers both archaeological methods and recent contributions to the historical and archaeological literatures on slavery. A central emphasis is a series of research projects that offer students the opportunity to use their newly acquired methodological and historical knowledge in the analysis of data from the Digital Archaeological Archive of Chesapeake Slavery . The class format combines lecture, discussion, and computer workshops. Pre-requisite: prior coursework in archaeology.

ANTH 401A POLITICS OF THE PAST (3) WATTENMAKER
T 1900-2130

To many societies, the history of land and ancestors form an integral component of sociocultural identity. This makes archaeology, which seeks to construct and understand the history of cultures and regions, deeply meaningful to modern populations living in areas where research is underway. Moreover, archaeological results are sometimes viewed as having bearing on modern political conflicts over issues such as land claims. This course examines the dynamic relationship between the past and present from a number of different angles. We consider, for example, the ways in which different interest groups manipulate understanding of the past to further their political agendas, and how the understanding an archaeologist may have of his/her own culture in relation to other cultures often shapes the ways that the past is portrayed in films, museum exhibits and scholarly literature. Specific issues and case studies from various parts of the world, such as the study of Native American cemetery sites, serve to highlight some of the ways that the past and present intersect and the impact modern politics has on the way archaeologists work. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 401B ENVIRONMENT, HISTORY, & SOCIETY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION (3) DAMON
M 1800-2030

Conducted through group reading assignments and reports, this course will first locate students in an overview of "Indo-Pacific" environments, social forms and histories, providing a working context for the remainder of the course. Second, through a small number of common readings, the course will engage a comparison between a place in contemporary South or East Asia, Indonesia, and Western Melanesia. Following each of these two sections electronic papers are due which should either summarize the section's reading in diary-style or attempt a synthesis based on one or two themes that can be made to run through the readings. These two papers should total 10-15 pages. The third portion of the course will focus on each individual student's major research project and paper. Student research presentations and papers should draw from the first two sections but need not be confined to the South Asia, East Asia, or Western Melanesia; lands relating to the shores of the Indian and Pacific Oceans define the areal limits within which you should organize your work. Temporally, anything from the early human history of this area to present-day political and cultural realities would be welcome. Demonstrating an ability to pull digitalized photography, graphs or maps into class presentations and the final paper will be part of the course requirement. The paper should be 10-15 pages long. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 401C LANGUAGES OF THE DIVINE (3) HARR
TR 0930-1045

Communication with God, gods, spirits, and ancestors presents a number of practical linguistic difficulties. How can you communicate with beings that are not directly perceivable? How do you know their response? How should you show respect in speaking to them? People have responded to these questions in an astonishing variety of ways, from the ephemeral sound-streams of speaking in tongues to the enduring formalities of daily prayer in Classical Arabic. We will explore this variety by reading and discussing a range of ethnographies that deal specifically with people's ways of speaking of and to the numinous. Our goal will not only be to sample the complexity and variety of religious languages, but also to discover what their forms and underlying presuppositions might tell us about language's place in social life. Coursework will consist of reading, short weekly response papers, and a research paper. Meets second writing requirement.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 529A MYTHODOLOGY (3) WAGNER
M 1400-1630

This course offers experience in using and understanding a very simple format for the analysis of a myth or story (any myth or story), called obviation. Following an introductory explanation, students will each select one or more myths or stories, and present and explain its obviation in class. Grading will be based on the student's expertise in doing so. The course grade is based on a final paper plus class participation

ANTH 529B THE EVERYDAY: THE ORDINARY, THE EXTRAORDINARY (3) UPTON
T 1530-1800

This seminar looks at the construction and experience of the commonplace - the ordinary places we visit every day and the things we do there. At the same time, it will also ask about ways that the banal is made extraordinary, for example through the construction of odd or striking buildings or landscapes (such as roadside structures or "outsider" art), the attribution of religious significance to otherwise unexceptional spaces, or the commemoration of catastrophic or exceptional events in ordinary spaces. Our exploration will draw on a variety of disciplinary stances and theoretical writings, including older studies of the folk and the vernacular, current works on the "everyday" by Lefebvre, Certeau, Bourdieu, and others, and psychological and philosophical works on perception, cognition, and concepts of the self.

ANTH 529C TIBETAN RELIGION (3) SIHLÉ
M 1530-1800

The seminar will focus on anthropological issues with regard to relations between religion and society, or religion and politics, ritual, symbolism, etc. In particular, theories of ritual and ethnographies of Tibetan ritual will be a central focus this year. The anthropological study of Tibetan religion faces a number of challenges: geographical and political obstacles, the complexity of notably the Tantric traditions, and the arduous task of bringing together ethnography, textual scholarship and larger anthropological issues and debates in a field still growing towards intellectual maturity. This seminar intends to be a contribution to such an endeavor.
Course Meets: Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 544 MORPHOLOGY (3) DOBRIN
T 1400-1630

This course provides an overview of recent morphological theory, focusing on recurring themes that have arisen as the subfield has sought to find its place within the generative paradigm. The issues we will cover fall mainly into two broad groupings: those that relate morphology to phonology (such as allomorphy and word formation), and those that relate it to syntax (e.g., inflection, distinguishing compounds from phrases). Throughout the course we will be mindful of whether there is such a thing as pure morphology, a core set of phenomena having to do with word structure which motivates a distinct component of grammar. Students will do weekly or biweekly problem sets and give a class presentation on a common morphological category or means of formal expression.

ANTH 546 TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (3) ROSS
TR 1230-1345

Study of the theory, problems, and methods in teaching English as a second language, with attention to relevant cultural matters and areas of general linguistics. This course is designed for students intending to specialize in the teaching of English to non-native speakers. The course will include approaches to second language learning, the discussion of learning and social problems in the multilingual classroom, the discussion of trends in the methodology of teaching, the critical examination of currently available teaching materials, and the discussion of problems in English phonology and syntax which present special problems in teaching. The approach used is eclectic and pragmatic. Students in the course are expected to be serious in their goals and to have some background in linguistics or in foreign languages. Appropriate for students applying for the Peace Corps, World Teach, the JET Program, Teach for America, etc. Permission of instructor required; Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 547 LANGUAGE AND IDENTITY (3) LEFKOWITZ
MW 1530-1645

This seminar explores the relationship between language and identity. In anthropology, where identity has become a central concern, language is seen as an important site for the construction of, and negotiation over social identities. In linguistics, reference to categories of social identity helps to explain language structure and change. The course explores the overlap between these converging trends by focusing on the notion of discourse as a nexus of cultural and linguistic processes related to identity. Readings will juxtapose social theoretic with linguistic treatments of identity, toward identifying theoretical framework that generate promising means for investigating and describing the phenomenon of identity.

ANTH 556 TOPICS IN ETHNOLOGY OF SOUTH ASIA (3) KHARE
T 1530-1800

A discussion of a selected group of theoretical and/or interpretive readings on social stratification, hierarchy and inequality, with emphasis on Max Weber, Marcel Mauss, Louis Dumont and Andre Beteille, and on some related new anthropological approaches and evaluations.

ANTH 557 ETHNOGRAPHY OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE SOCIETIES (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1530-1645

In this advanced level seminar we will read approximately one ethnography every week, selected to represent the most recent work exploring issues of rural and urban life, gender, sexuality, ethnicity and religion in contemporary Chinese societies. Requirements include weekly written reading responses, preparation of discussion questions and handouts by assigned 'reporters', active seminar participation, an annotated bibliography, and a 20-page term paper

AANTH 565 CREOLE NARRATIVES (3) MENTORE
TR 1530-1645

We begin with 18th- and 19th-century Caribbean intellectual life. We do so from the perspective of European imperialism and its influences upon colonized values, slavery, race, class and color. We examine the persistence of these major themes through the 20th century, formalized in the battle of ideas between the elite of the mother country and the Creole upper classes. We will attempt to read the images of the Creole self and explore their claims for a crisis of identity. We will also focus on the so-called spiritual character of the Creole personality. We shall conclude by looking at the way in which the specifics of island culture have directed nation building and how they appear to have helped in the perpetuation of ideological and political dependencies.

ANTH 572A THE EFFICACY OF PERFORMANCE (3) TURNER
W 1900-2130

The seminar will study a range of ritual performances, including initiations, healing rituals, shaman journeys, and the traditional acts of approach to the sacred in the main religions. The extraordinary power of collective and harmonized music in healing and religion will be traced in major examples, students being encouraged to bring their own tapes and choice of movie to discuss with the class. We will perform the rituals we study in order to experience their power. The phenomenon of "zone" in performance and what Victor Turner called moments of communitas are key parts of this study. Also we will keep in mind the very recent work on music by the neurobiologists.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 702 CURRENT THEORY (3) SABEA
TR 1530-1645

The course continues the agenda of ANTH 701, reviewing the development of anthropological theory from the 1940s to the present. Special attention is devoted to theoretical engagements with the concepts of power, practice, symbol and meaning, history, time/space/body, and political economy. The course also draws on recent debates within anthropology and across disciplinary boundaries in relation to science, state and nation, globalization, trans-"nationalism", post-"modernism", and post-"colonialism."

ANTH 706 GRANT WRITING/RESEARCH DESIGN (3) METCALF
T 1900-2130

This workshop for graduate students actively involved in writing grant applications and research proposals.

ANTH 708 ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHOD AND THEORY (3) HANTMAN
MW 1400-1515

An intensive investigation of current research in the principles, methods, findings, and analysis of anthropological archaeology.

ANTH 711 PAPER AND PRESENTATION (3) LAVIOLETTE
R 1800-2030

This workshop is designed for second-year anthropology graduate students as they prepare the MA-qualifying Paper and Presentation.

ANTH 717 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) SAPIR
TR 1400-1515

This course is concerned with visual representation in Anthropology as it has been practiced and might be practiced. This year it is divided primarily into two major topics: the use film in anthropology and of still photography in the parallel discipline of documentary photography and photojournalism. Film (and now video) has played a seminal role in Visual Anthropology with many classic films starting with Robert Flaherty's 'Nanook of the North' and running up to recent work of such filmmakers as David MacDougall. The second half of the course will be devoted to aspects of documentary photography starting with the early work of Jakob Riis and Lewis Hine through the great period of the FSA and followed by the importance of LIFE magazine and the street photographers of the 60s and 70s. Students will divide up into teams that will be responsible for giving oral presentations covering specific films and photographic topics.

ANTH 719 MARRIAGE, MORTALITLY, FERTILITY (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1230-1345

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality gender, age, and class, and the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision -making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 732 AMERICAN FOLKLORE (3) PERDUE
TR 1100-1215

This course will focus primarily on Anglo-and Afro-American traditional culture and, within that domain, deal with problems of definition, origin, collection, and analysis of the main genres of folklore-narrative and song. This course is cross-listed with ENAM 885

ANTH 737 POWER AND THE BODY (3) MENTORE
MW 1530-1620

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced.

ANTH 748 LANGUAGE AND PREHISTORY (3) DANZIGER
MWF 1000-1050


This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics--the study of how languages change over time--and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider for example the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. Examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan languages of Central America, and will include discussion of pre-Columbian Mesomerican writing systems and their ongoing decipherment.

ANTH 759 ETHNOPHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M 1930-2200

This course will be composed of two parts - academic and workshop. The academic part of the course will exam specific photographic works that can be thought of as "ethnographic" in some way. The materials will be drawn from documentary photography and photojournalism. Particular attention will be given to the "photo essay" as exemplified in "LIFE" Magazine. Students will give oral reports, to be written up, on selected photographers and topics. The workshop will be an ethnophotography project. Students will find an appropriate field subject to photograph. The work will be displayed in a "photo essay" form and presented to a jury. Digital photography will not be used. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and knowledge of darkroom techniques. Open to one graduate student only.

ANTH 762 CINEMA IN INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 1400-1630

A discussion of the social, historical and aesthetic aspects world's largest film industry. Both the popular "Bollywood" film and the "art film" that exists outside it are discussed.

ANTH 783 CHACO CANYON (3) MOST/PLOG
F 0930-1200

A review and critique of current approaches to understanding the development and collapse of Chaco Canyon and the broader Chacoan World of the Four Corners region of the American Southwest. In particular we will focus on developments during the 9th through 12th centuries. Recent monographs and articles will be emphasized during class discussions, although we will also review the history of Chacoan studies and the variety of perspectives that have been offered to understand culture change. Three or four experts on the Chaco region will likely participate in some of the weekly seminars. Students will be expected to prepare a major research paper and be thoroughly prepared for class meetings each week.

ANTH 794 ARCHAEOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO SLAVERY IN THE CHESAPEAKE (3) NEIMAN
W 1700-1390

This course explores how archaeological evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of slavery and the slave-based society that evolved in the Chesapeake from the 17th through early-19th centuries. The course covers both archaeological methods and recent contributions to the historical and archaeological literatures on slavery. A central emphasis is a series of research projects that offer students the opportunity to use their newly acquired methodological and historical knowledge in the analysis of data from the Digital Archaeological Archive of Chesapeake Slavery (http://www.daacs.org). The class format combines lecture, discussion, and computer workshops. Pre-requisite: prior coursework in archaeology.

ANTH 883 TRAVEL WRITING AND ETHNOGRAPHY (3) METCALF
MW 1400-1515

Travel writing was widely popular in 18th- and 19th-century England, and produced lively accounts of other places and peoples based on personal experience. For example, Lady Wortley Montagu, wife of the ambassador to Turkey, gained access in the 1760s to the Sultan's harem, and records her conversations with its inhabitants. In the jargon of modern ethnography, she established "rapport" with them. Herman Melville had a less comfortable experience during his enforced stay in the Marquesas. Even so, he describes his novel "Typee" as a "peep at Polynesian life," foreshadowing a century of anthropologist of "Gulliver's Travels." In short, travel writing has influenced genres from fantasy, through the novel, to contemporary ethnography. This course explores the nature of that influence, and the continuing affinity between the genres.