1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Description - Spring 2006

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics
225,232,236,290,329,334
336,337,359,407,528,529A
529B,529C,572A
222,261,353,362
370,373,374,565
281,389,394,584,
590
341,345,549A,549B
Non-Western perspectives for the majors 
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern requirement)
222,362,370,373,565
Senior Seminars 
401A,401B,401C

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 222 BUDDHISM 3.0 SENEVIRATNE
TR 1400-1515

An introduction to orthodox or Theravada Buddhism. The focus of the course is sociological, so it is more about how Buddhism is practiced by the peasants of South and Southeast Asia than about the Buddhist doctrine itself. The course is confined to Theravada societies, and does not deal with Mahayana Buddhism.

ANTH 225 NATIONALISM, RACISM, MULTICULTURALISM (3) HANDLER
MW 1400-1515

Introductory course in which the concepts of culture, multiculturalism, race, racism, and nationalism are critically examined in terms of how they are used and structure social relations in American society and, by comparison, how they are defined in other cultures throughout the world. Students may enroll in one of the optional discussion sections in 225D.

ANTH 232 ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION (3) METCALF
MW 1100-1150

Ritual provides the characteristic approach of anthropology to the comparative study of religion, and the analysis of ritual is anthropology's major contribution to that project. In no other sphere of social life is the alienness of other cultures more striking. Arguably, ritual presents a special challenge to anthropology. This course asks fundamental questions about what rituals mean, and shows how far we have come to answering them in a century of theorizing. The student must enroll in one of the obligatory discussion sections in 232D.

ANTH 236 CASTANEDA & DON JUAN (3) WAGNER
TR 0930-1045

The six books of Carlos Castaneda represent what is perhaps an anthropological ideal--a world in which the native's concepts of power, sorcery, and transformation are "real" rather than the social systems, adaptations, and symbolic processes generally used to explain them. They are not ethnography; in his latest preface Castaneda prefers to treat them as "autobiography." Yet they can be used very effectively to illustrate a wide range of concepts in anthropology and traditional religions, which is what this course is all about. It will not teach you to fly--it may teach you to write--but it will hopefully help you to understand how anthropologists think. The course will be given in an open seminar format, with discussion encouraged. Grades will be based on 3 papers.

ANTH 261 ASIAN AMERICA: FROM ORIENTALS TO APAs (3) HO
TR 1230-1420

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to Asian America through an overview of major historical trends; a critical review of several Asian American issues; and a focused examination of three Asian ethnic communities. Course materials introduce cross-cultural themes comparing Asian Americans with African Americans, Latin Americans (or Hispanics), European Americans, and Asian transnationals. Although an interdisciplinary course, most of the course materials are ethnographic (qualitative) studies framed by anthropological and American race concepts and theories.

ANTH 281 HUMAN ORIGINS (3) HANTMAN
MW 1400-1515

The course is intended to provide an overview and assessment of the theory, methods, and data used by anthropologists to reconstruct human physical and cultural evolution. Chronologically, the course spans the time from the initial appearance of hominids (ca. 4.5 million years ago) to the period prior to the rise of urbanism and early state formation (ca. 10,000 B.C.). The course is divided into three topical components: 1) a review of evolutionary theory, and the controversy surrounding that theory; 2) an in-depth survey of the data used to support current models of the pattern of human evolution; and 3) a study of the origins of modern human adaptations in the relatively recent past, with respect to uniquely human behaviors such as complex language, ritual, religion and art.

ANTH 290 CULTURAL POLITICS OF AMERICAN FAMILY VALUES (3) McKINNON
MW 1500-1550

This course provides a broad survey of the range of cultural understandings, economic structures, and political and legal constraints that shape both dominant and alternative forms of kinship and family in the United States. The course is divided in three parts. The first examines the tension between the cultural values of biology and choice as they configure understandings about what counts as family in the U.S. We will look at the cultural ideas that organize the dominant understandings of what constitutes family and trace the ways in which these are refracted through and transformed by divorce, adoption, the new reproductive technologies, and gay and lesbian kinship. The second investigates the economic relations that structure different class formations of family—including those of dynastic families, low wage workers, the homeless, and national and transnational migrants. The third explores the cultural understandings that give shape to the legal and political constraints on the possible forms of sexuality, marriage, reproduction, and family. Here, we will consider legal controversies relating to cousin marriage, polygamy, and gay marriage; sexuality, birth control, and abortion; and adoption, eugenics, and welfare. Students must enroll in a discussion section of 290D.

ANTH 301 HISTORY AND THEORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY 4.0 DAMON
TR 1100-1215

Designed for students majoring in anthropology, this course reviews the history of anthropology from the late 18th century to the present. It explores both the development of theory and the discipline's experience in learning about the human condition in specific places across the globe. Mindful that anthropology is itself a social process, developing through certain times and distinctive to specific places, the course will consider both the discipline's generated content and the role proto- and contemporary anthropologists have played in their societies. Students must enroll in one of the discussion sections, 301D. These sections will be partly devoted to considering assigned class readings and lectures in a seminar format; but they will also be organized so that specific sets of students will focus on anthropology's contributions to the understanding of specific regions of the world, the Americas, Euro-Asia, Africa, and the Indo-Pacific. One question to be addressed here is how we make the discipline's contributions relevant to our roles as citizens of the world. Sets of students will also be responsible for reading and producing a collective critical review of the biography of a distinctive contributor to the record of anthropology, e.g., Morgan, Malinowski, Benedict, Leach. This course should meet the second writing requirement

ANTH 329 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILTIY (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1100-1215

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality, gender, age, and class, and the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision-making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations. ANTH 101 or equivalent recommended as background. This is an advanced course, adding to general offerings in social organization, kinship, marriage, and gender. This course is intended for upper-level majors and non-majors and satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 334 ECOLOGY AND SOCIETY (3) DAMON
MWF 1100-1150

This course attempts to 1) mediate the divide between the Arts and the Sciences; 2) introduce students new to anthropology to aspects of culture theory and contemporary ecological/environmental anthropology; 3) forge a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology; 4) provide new insights on how human cultures both fashion and are fashioned by their environments; 5) provide a seminar-like context in which we can evaluate, as anthropologists and citizens of our world, aspects of the current environmental debate in our culture; and 6) facilitate independent study on environmental issues on the part of each student. Although case studies will be drawn from throughout the world, there will be a stress on the social systems and environments triangulating South Asia, East Asia, and Australia, and the Americas. The course will be taught in two parts. Lectures based on readings will occupy every Monday and Wednesday. Fridays shall be devoted to a seminar format in which the class collectively discusses and each student reads one of several books mediating one or another aspect of the environmental debate dealing with both research and contemporary policy.

ANTH 336 LIFE HISTORY AND ORAL HISTORY (3) PERDUE & MARTIN-PERDUE
TR 1400-1515

This course is focused primarily on practical experience in the field situation, and training in the creation of written life histories from transcriptions of recorded oral interviews conducted by the student. It will also present and discuss theoretical issues involved in the interpretation and use of life history and oral history material. This course is cross-listed in the English Department as ENAM 336, Life History and Oral History. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 337 POWER AND THE BODY (3) MENTORE
MW 1700-1815

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced. This satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 341 SOCIOLINGUISTICS (3) DANZIGER
MW 1000-1050

Sociolinguistics is the study of the way language is used to express social relationships. Topics to be covered include language as an index of socio-economic class, Black English, male-female language, pidgin and Creole languages, the analysis of everyday conversation, and political, legal, and social issues affecting language use in multilingual societies, including ours. Midterm and final; field project involving observation of language use in the speech community. Students must enroll in one of the discussion sections in 341D.

ANTH 345 NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGES (3) DANZIGER
T 1400-1630

This course is an introduction to the native languages of the Americas and to the methods that linguists and anthropologists have used to record and analyze them. It covers linguistic analysis and theory as a way into knowledge of languages very different from English and the frequently studied European languages. The methods of analysis learned should enable students to make intelligent use of linguistic materials on languages in other parts of the world as well. The native languages of the Americas are many, diverse and unevenly studied. Generalizations about them all can rarely be very meaningful or penetrating. The best way to gain a genuine sense of the subject is to become familiar with one of the languages. Such familiarity will give more than acquaintance with that particular language. It will give insight into the nature of the data and problems of the field as a whole (i.e., the field of study of languages which have been, for their speakers, unwritten.) To achieve this purpose, the course is designed so that each student will be working on a different language for which adequate published materials are available. The major assignments involve that work. Pre-requisite: LGS 325, LGS 701 or ANTH 740. This course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and for Linguistics graduate students.

ANTH 353 ANTHROPOLOGY OF EASTERN EUROPE (3) MAKAROVA
W 1530-1800

This course explores current changes in East European societies focusing on everyday social life. Among the topics to be discussed are the changing cultural meanings of work and consumption, the nature of property rights and relations, family and gender, ethnicity and nationalism, religion and ritual.

ANTH 359 ETHNO–PHOTOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M 1930-2200

This course will be composed of two parts: academic and workshop. The academic part of the course will examine specific photographic works that can be thought of as "ethnographic" in some way. The material will be drawn from documentary photography and photojournalism. Particular attention will be given to the "photo essay" as exemplified in LIFE Magazine. Students will give oral reports, to be written up, on selected photographers and topics. The workshop will be an ethnophotography project. Students will find an appropriate field subject to photograph. The work will be displayed in a "photo essay" form and presented to a jury. Digital photography will not be used. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and knowledge of darkroom techniques and access to a darkroom. Open to nine undergraduates, and one graduate student under ANTH 759.

ANTH 362 CINEMA IN INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M 1400-1630

A discussion of the popular and "art" cinema of India with focus on the evolution of the Indian cinema as the indigenization of an alien art form. The course primarily involves discussion based on required readings on the historical, social and aesthetic aspects of the Indian film. Students are expected to view selected films in groups outside class time, and make presentations which would serve as a basis of discussion.

ANTH 370 CONTEMPORARY HINDUISM (3) KHARE
TR 1100-1215

This course deals with some interrelated major cultural, religious and political changes in India after the independence in 1947, with a special focus on the urban family, marriage and caste organizations; the rising Indian middle class; the changing status of women and Dalits; major religious celebrations; and womanhood and nationalism in Indian television.

ANTH 373 CULTURAL PROPERTY AND AMAZONIAN PEOPLES (3) MEYER
TR 1230-1345

Do corporations owe indigenous peoples when they exploit traditional knowledge to make money? Should ethnic groups have a right to control their public representation? This course will address these questions through a focus on the Amazon region. We'll begin with an overview of the basin's geography and the social forces that have shaped its political and cultural contours. We will then consider the multiple senses in which contemporary politics of culture in the Amazon center on questions of control: control of natural resources, cultural knowledge, and identity. Our case studies will include ethnic revitalization, bioprospecting, and sustainable development. They will ultimately lead us to reflect on issues including cultural survival, indigenous sovereignty, and intellectual property rights that go beyond our regional focus. Course requirements include discussion of readings and films and weekly response papers. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 374 EAST/WEST: TURKISH CULTURE IN TRANSITION (3) McCARTY
TR 1530-1645

In the aftermath of World War I Mustafa Kemal Ataturk founded the modern Turkish Republic using radical changes to promote secular, Western, European values, actively rejecting outward symbols of the dying "Oriental" Ottoman Empire and the caliphate. Today Turkey is fighting to fulfill Ataturk's vision by becoming the first predominantly Muslim nation to join the European Union, but an internal ideological struggle continues between conceptions of East and West, Orientalism, and modernity. Turkey's strategic location between Europe and Middle Eastern countries such as Iraq, its historical role as a "crossroad of civilizations," and issues such as the place of Islam in a secular society, the meaning of the headscarf, and EU pressure to reevaluate the role of ethnic diversity in its troubled Southeast lead us on an intellectual journey to discover how Turks bridge the cultural distance between "East" and "West."

ANTH 389 ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST (3) PLOG
TR 0930-1045

An examination of the prehistory of the American Southwest (New Mexico, Arizona, and southern Utah and Colorado) with an emphasis on the origin and development of Pueblo culture in the Four Corners region. Topics will include the origin of agriculture, the establishment of village-based organization, demographic change including the major population declines of the 12th and 13th centuries, conflict/warfare, and ritual change. Particular areas of concern will be the Chaco Canyon region of northwestern New Mexico, Mesa Verde, and the Salt-Gila River Valleys.

ANTH 394 ARCHAEOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO CHESAPEAKE SLAVERY (3) NEIMAN
W 1700-1930

This course explores how archaeological evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of slavery and the slave-based society that evolved in the Chesapeake from the 17th through early-19th centuries. The course covers both archaeological methods and recent contributions to the historical and archaeological literatures on slavery. A central emphasis is a series of research projects that offer students the opportunity to use their newly acquired methodological and historical knowledge in the analysis of data from the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (http://www.daacs.org). The class format combines lecture, discussion, and computer workshops. Pre-requisite: prior coursework in archaeology.

ANTH 401A POLITICS OF THE PAST (3) WATTENMAKER
T 1900-2130

To many societies, the history of land and ancestors form an integral component of sociocultural identity. This makes archaeology, which seeks to construct and understand the history of cultures and regions, deeply meaningful to modern populations living in areas where research is underway. Moreover, archaeological results are sometimes viewed as having bearing on modern political conflicts over issues such as land claims. This course examines the dynamic relationship between the past and present from a number of different angles. We consider, for example, the ways in which different interest groups manipulate understanding of the past to further their political agendas, and how the understanding an archaeologist may have of his/her own culture in relation to other cultures often shapes the ways that the past is portrayed in films, museum exhibits and scholarly literature. Specific issues and case studies from various parts of the world, such as the study of Native American cemetery sites, serve to highlight some of the ways that the past and present intersect and the impact modern politics has on the way archaeologists work. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 401B CULTURE OF CONSUMPTION (3) BASHKOW
TR 1400-1515

What are the implications for humankind of the globalization of a culture of consumption? To answer this question we will develop a critical perspective on modern consumer society by studying social theory and current ethnographic research on production and marketing, and by comparative study of noncapitalist cultural systems for the exchange of material goods. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 401C LANGUAGE AND EDUCATION (3) MOSKOWITZ
TR 0930-1045

This course follows the topic of "language and education" down two paths. On the first path, we will be thinking about the ways both language and formal education socialize individuals as members of their particular society. On the second, we will examine some of the ways in which language itself is an issue for schools. In this portion of the course, we will examine some renowned classroom controversies, such as bilingual education and Ebonics (African-American Vernacular English), but we will also look at some more subtle ways in which language plays a role in school life, such as when language becomes an identity marker for school groups. Meets second writing requirement.

ANTH 407 TRANSNATIONALISM/GLOBALIZATION (3) HO
T 1600-1830

This Seminar course is designed to meet the following objectives:

  1. introduce students to the factors influencing transnational migration and globalization.
  2. familiarize students with prevailing theories to transnational migration and globalization, and
  3. read/view/screen multiple forms of text (ethnographic studies, novel, poetry, mixed media, photographs, documentaries, feature films, comic strip) that reveal
    1. the personal impact and lived experiences of immigrants to the United States and American emigrants to other countries (transnationalism)
    2. the political-economic and social-cultural impact and reception of "America" in other countries (globalization)

This course will examine the socio-historical trends, political-economic conditions, cultural implications, and individual/community/corporate/national government responses to transnational and globalized flows of people, commerce and ideas to and from the United States.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 529A MYTHODOLOGY (3) WAGNER
TR 1230-1345

This course offers experience in using and understanding a very simple format for the analysis of a myth or story (any myth or story), called obviation. Following an introductory explanation, students will each select one or more myths or stories, and present and explain its obviation in class. Grading will be based on the students' expertise in doing so in a final paper plus class participation.

ANTH 529B ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE SUBALTERNS: ENCOUNTERS, EXPERIENCES AND CONTROVERSIES (3) KHARE
M 1530-1800

Comparative presentations and discussions on selected field-study based, and/or film-depicted encounters, experiences and controversies on those who are socially and politically marginalized and exploited, including the recent ethnographic and social controversies surrounding the Hawaiians, the Indian low castes and Dalits, and the Yanomami.

ANTH 549A TOPICS IN LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3) LEFKOWITZ
M 1530-1800

This course is a research seminar that explores the range of research methods and analytical strategies currently used by practicing linguistic anthropologists. The class will be dependent upon the regular meetings of the inter-disciplinary linguistic anthropology seminar (which meets on Fridays 1-3 pm), and regular participation in that forum is a required part of this course. In addition, participants will present original research of their own in seminar format and read and critique the research of their colleagues.
Instructor permission required.

ANTH 549B ON TRANSLATION (3) SAPIR
TR 0930-1045

The course will consider the problems, methodologies and politics of language translation. Run as a seminar, students will work through specific translation problems presenting their results to the class. Visitors from the University community will be invited to present translation problems they have encountered and solved. I hope to have a broad variety of languages represented. Prerequisite: a thorough reading knowledge of a second language.

ANTH 565 CREOLE NARRATIVES (3) MENTORE
WF 1400-1515

We begin with 18th- and 19th-century Caribbean intellectual life. We do so from the perspective of European imperialism and its influences upon colonized values, slavery, race, class and color. We examine the persistence of these major themes through the 20th century, formalized in the battle of ideas between the elite of the mother country and the Creole upper classes. We will attempt to read the images of the Creole self and explore their claims for a crisis of identity. We will also focus on the so-called spiritual character of the Creole personality. We shall conclude by looking at the way in which the specifics of island culture have directed nation building and how they appear to have helped in the perpetuation of ideological and political dependencies.

ANTH 572A FIELDWORK AND ETHNOGRAPHY (3) TURNER
R 1900-2130

The seminar focuses on the skills needed for anthropological fieldwork, particularly concentrating on recent changes in the relationship between fieldworkers and the people encountered in the culture--those who were formerly known in anthropology as "informants." To change this, the seminar will aim at a relationship of "co-researcher." We are also going to share and discuss information about the practicalities of doing fieldwork in societies outside the United States. Members of the seminar will undertake small local fieldwork projects and bring the results back to class for discussion. Finally we will face the problem of the obscure style of anthropological writing, and will experiment with various forms to find those suited both to the particularities of individuals and to topic. The aim is to make our discipline intelligible to the world. The class is a home seminar.

ANTH 584 ZOOARCHAEOLOGY (3) WATTENMAKER
M 1700-1930

This laboratory course provides students with the background and skills needed to analyze animal bones from archaeological sites. Emphasis will be placed on the potential of faunal analysis for contributing to anthropological issues, such as the domestication of animals, political economy, the origins of the state, and the organization of urban economies. Class sessions will include lectures and laboratory work. Lectures will include a critical survey of the methodological approaches and techniques used to address anthropological questions through the analysis of faunal remains. Topics such as research design, strategies of field collection of faunal remains, and data analysis and interpretation will be covered. In the laboratory, students will learn to identify faunal remains to species, to determine age and sex of species, to distinguish between wild and domestic animals, to recognize bone pathologies, and to observe cultural modification of bones, such as butchering marks. The course requirements include a series of short papers based on laboratory analysis of archaeological faunal remains, and a final paper. The final paper will involve the analysis of a small archaeological collection of faunal remains from the ancient city of Kazane (Turkey), focusing on a particular time period (e.g., prehistoric, early historic) and part of the site (e.g., house, palace). Each student will share his or her findings with the rest of the class. We will compare and contrast results, and discuss implications of findings. Cooperation and discussion between students is strongly encouraged. This course is intended for advanced undergraduate Anthropology or Archaeology majors, advanced undergraduate students in related fields such as Zoology and Classics, and graduate students in Anthropology (or related fields such as Architecture/Historical Archaeology) with a specialization in archaeology.

ANTH 590 QUANTITATIVE METHODS II (3) MOST/PLOG
W 1400-1630

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence that provides an introduction to the use of analytical procedures, database applications, statistics, and quantitative methods in anthropology. Multivariate analytical techniques used to describe and analyze archaeological and anthropological data sets are emphasized. More specifically, the course focuses on research design; factor, cluster, and discriminant analysis; sample-size/diversity issues; and spatial analysis with an introduction to the use of Geographic Information Systems. Prior knowledge of statistics is necessary; background in anthropology, archaeology, or a related field is required.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 702 CURRENT THEORY (3) BASHKOW
TR 1530-1645

The course continues the agenda of ANTH 701, reviewing the development of anthropological theory from the 1940s to the present. Special attention is devoted to theoretical engagements with the concepts of power, practice, symbol and meaning, history, time/space/body, and political economy. The course also draws on recent debates within anthropology and across disciplinary boundaries in relation to science, state and nation, globalization, trans-"nationalism," post-"modernism," and post-"colonialism."

ANTH 706 GRANT WRITING (3) METCALF
T 1700-1930

A workshop for graduate students on how to write solid dissertation proposals and winning applications for research grants. We will examine model proposals and discuss application strategies, selection criteria, and the process by which applications are evaluated. Each student will prepare a draft proposal and take it through several revisions that will be discussed by the group.

ANTH 708 ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHOD AND THEORY (3) HANTMAN
TR 1230-1345

An intensive investigation of current research in the principles, methods, findings, and analysis of anthropological archaeology.

ANTH 711 PAPER AND PRESENTATION (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1530-1645

This workshop is designed for second-year anthropology graduate students as they prepare the MA-qualifying Paper and Presentation.

ANTH 719 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILITY (3) SHEPHERD
TR 1100-1215

This explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality, gender, age, and class, and the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex rations at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision-making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 735 LIFE HISTORY AND ORAL HISTORY (3) PERDUE & MARTIN-PERDUE
TR 1400-1515

This course is focused primarily on practical experience in the field situation and training in the creation of written life histories from transcriptions of recorded oral interviews conducted by the student. It will also present and discuss theoretical issues involved in the interpretation and use of life history and oral history material.

ANTH 737 POWER AND THE BODY (3) MENTORE
MW 1700-1815

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced.

ANTH 745 NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGES (3) DANZIGER
T 1400-1630

This course in an introduction to the native languages of the Americas and to the methods that linguists and anthropologists have used to record and analyze them. It covers linguistic analysis and theory as a way into knowledge of languages very different from English and the frequently studied European languages. The methods of analysis learned should enable students to make intelligent use of linguistic materials on languages in other parts of the world as well. The native languages of the Americas are many, diverse and unevenly studied. Generalizations about them all can rarely be very meaningful or penetrating. The best way to gain a genuine sense of the subject is to become familiar with one of the languages. Such familiarity will give more than acquaintance with that particular language. It will give insight into the nature of the data and problems of the field as a whole (i.e., the field of study of languages which have been, for their speakers, unwritten.) To achieve this purpose, the course is designed so that each student will be working on a different language for which adequate published materials are available. The major assignments involve that work. Pre-requisite: LGS 325, LGS 701 or ANTH 740. This course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics graduate students.

ANTH 753 ANTHROPOLOGY OF EASTERN EUROPE (3) MAKAROVA
W 1530-1800

This course explores current changes in East European societies focusing on everyday social life. Among the topics to be discussed are the changing cultural meanings of work and consumption, the nature of property rights and relations, family and gender, ethnicity and nationalism, religion and ritual.

ANTH 759 ETHNOPHOGRAPHY (3) SAPIR
M 1930-2200

This course will be composed of two parts: academic and workshop. The academic part of the course will examine specific photographic works that can be thought of as "ethnographic' in some way. The material will be drawn from documentary photography and photojournalism. Particular attention will be given to the "photo essay" as exemplified in LIFE Magazine. Students will give oral reports, to be written up, on selected photographers and topics. The workshop will be an ethnophotography project. Students will find an appropriate field subject to photograph. The work will be displayed in a "photo essay" form and presented to a jury. Digital photography will not be used. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, knowledge of darkroom techniques and access to a darkroom. Open to one graduate student, and nine undergraduates under ANTH 359.

ANTH 762 CINEMA IN INDIA (3) SENEVIRATNE
M  1400 -1630

A discussion of the popular and "art" cinema of India with focus on the evolution of the Indian cinema as the indigenization of an alien art form. The course primarily involves discussion based on required readings on the historical, social and aesthetic aspects of the Indian film. Students are expected to view selected films in groups outside class time, and make presentations which would serve as a basis of discussion.

ANTH 770 INDIAN SOCIAL INEQUALITY AND THE PUBLIC DISCOURSES (3) KHARE
 TBA 

This graduate seminar focuses readings, discussions and writing assignments on such distinct Indian public discourses on social inequalities as those surrounding Indian non-governmental organizations (NGOs), indigenous protest groups, and human rights organizations.
Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

ANTH 789 ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE  AMERICAN  SOUTHWEST (3) PLOG
TR 0930-1045

An examination of the prehistory of the American Southwest (New Mexico, Arizona, and southern Utah and Colorado) with an emphasis on the origin and development of Pueblo culture in the Four Corners region. Topics will include the origin of agriculture, the establishment of village-based organization, demographic change including the major population declines of the 12th and 13th centuries, conflict/warfare, and ritual change. Particular areas of concern will be the Chaco Canyon region of northwestern New Mexico, Mesa Verde, and the Salt-Gila River Valleys.

ANTH 790 ANTHROPOLOGY AND  COLONIALISM  (POSTCOLONIAL THEORY) (3) METCALF
MW 1400-1515

The currently revived interest in colonialism intersects the fields of literacy criticism, history and anthropology, and these readings reflect this hybridity. Our interests in them are: what anthropology has to tell about colonialism; to what extent it is compromised by complicity in colonialism; and how an awareness of colonialism should recast current fieldwork and theory.

 

This course explores how archaeological evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of slavery and the slave-based society that evolved in the Chesapeake from the 17th through early-19th centuries. The course covers both archaeological methods and recent contributions to the historical and archaeological literatures on slavery. A central emphasis is a series of research projects that offer students the opportunity to use their newly acquired methodological and historical knowledge in the analysis of data from the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (http://www.daacs.org). The class format combines lecture, discussion, and computer workshops. Pre-requisite: prior coursework in archaeology.