1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Spring 2010

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics
2210,2320,2360,2365, 2559-2, 2670,3129, 274,3340,3370, 3559-5,3559-6,3559-7, 3600,5360,5529-1, 5529-2, 5529-3 2153, 2559-2, 2559-3, 3559-1, 3685,3670, 4559-3 2559-1, 2820, 3175, 3559-2, 3559-3, 3885, 4559-1, 4559-2, 5589 2400, 2430, 2440, 3490, 5040, 5430

Major Requirements
3010
Non-Western perspectives for the majors
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern equirement)
1010, 2153, 2320, 2400, 2559-3, 3559-1, 3685, 3670, 3685, 4559-3, 5430
Senior Seminars
4991-1,4991-2,4991-3

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 1010 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DOUGLASS
MWF 1000-1050
 

This course introduces the student to some general topics of interest in cultural anthropology. Through readings, films, lectures and discussions student should come to an understanding of the extent of human diversity. We explore what anthropologists mean by "culture" and the methodology most associated with cultural anthropology, fieldwork. A number of societies from around the world provide examples of different practices regarding the meaning of "progress," language and belief, patterns of family relations, the social construction of identity, and the question of "race." We look at other cultures to develop an appreciation of cultural diversity and cultural relativism. However, the anthropological method is comparative, and the aim of anthropology is always to know our own culture better. Satisfies College's Non-Western Perspective Requirement

ANTH 2153 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS 3.0 HANTMAN
MW 1400-1515

This class is intended to introduce students to the wide variety of cultures and the diversity of historical experiences of Native Americans. After a review of topics in American Indian history, the course will review contemporary issues of concern to Native groups in the U.S. Throughout the course we will consider how Indians and Indian history have been portrayed in popular media by both indigenous and non-indigenous writers, artists, academics, political activists and others. Issues of contemporary political action and sovereignty will also be reviewed.

ANTH 2210 MARRIAGE & THE FAMILY: ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE CHRISTIAN RIGHT? 3.0 CHIPUMURO
TR 1100-1215

This course examines the various constructions of "the family" mobilized by American Christian movements. Locating the family as a central social institution fueling the U.S. "culture wars," this class surveys marriage, reproduction, sexuality, and religious membership as contested avenues producing kinship. Through our explorations of provocative social and historical studies, documentaries, and popular culture texts, we will engage in energetic discussions that force us to confront our notions of what family is and can be.

ANTH 2320 ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION 3.0 HARR
TR 1100-1215

This course is an introduction to anthropological thinking on the place of religion in the human condition. Our inquiry will be organized around a number of themes and practices found in many of the world's religious traditions, including cosmology, ritual, possession, fundamentalism, and pilgrimage. We will endeavor to think critically about these themes by examining them through a range of cultural lenses. Grading will be based on a mid-term and final exam as well as an individual research project and presentation.

ANTH 2360 CASTANEDA & DON JUAN 3.0 WAGNER
TR 0930-1045

The six books of Carlos Castaneda represent what is perhaps an anthropological ideal--a world in which the native's concepts of power, sorcery, and transformation are "real" rather than the social systems, adaptations, and symbolic processes generally used to explain them. They are not ethnography; in his latest preface Castaneda prefers to treat them as "autobiography." Yet they can be used very effectively to illustrate a wide range of concepts in anthropology and traditional religions, which is what this course is all about. It will not teach you to fly--it may teach you to write--but it will hopefully help you to understand how anthropologists think. The course will be given in an open seminar format, with discussion encouraged. Grades will be based on 3 papers.

ANTH 2365 ART & ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DOUGLASS
MW 1530-1645

The course will emphasize art in small-scale (contemporary) societies (sometimes called ethnic art or “primitive art”). It will include a survey of aesthetic productions of major areas throughout the world (Australia, Africa, Oceania, Native America, Meso-America). We will also read about and discuss such issues as art and cultural identity, tourist arts, anonymity, authenticity, the question of universal aesthetic cannons, exhibiting cultures, the difference between the bellas artes and arte popular, and the impact of globalization on these arts.

ANTH 2400 LANGUAGE & CULTURE 3.0 CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 1400-1450

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

ANTH 2430 LANGUAGES OF THE WORLD 3.0 DOBRIN
MW 1100-1150

Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor. This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language.

ANTH 2559-1 PACIFIC ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 BICKLER
TR 0930-1045

This course explores the archaeology of the Pacific region from the first humans' arrival in Australia and Papua New Guinea, and follows the migrations across the Pacific Ocean through the material culture, linguistics and biology. Topics including exploration, colonization, settlement patterns, inter-island trade, cultural change, emergence of complex societies and the arrival of European explorers. The course looks at the history of archaeological research in the Pacific through to recent developments in archaeology in the islands and explores the unique issues in the excavation and interpretation of sites in the Pacific.

ANTH 2559-2 WORLD OF ISLAND: OCEANIA 3.0 METCALF
MW 1400-1450

Austronesia Languages of the Austronesia family are widely dispersed. Speakers are found from Madagascar, all the way through the archipelago of Southeast Asia, and out across the vast Pacific. It is a world of islands. To approach this hidden world requires us to reserves the landsmen’s geography, and see oceans instead of continents. In doing so we will learn about the migrations of its people, their diverse historical experiences, and the extraordinary range of societies and cultures that have resulted.

ANTH 2559-3 GENDER, FAMILY, & NATION: SOUTH KOREA 3.0 FREEMAN
TR 1230-1345

This course looks at the way South Korean men and women have refashioned their everyday lives amidst the radical and turbulent changes of the past four decades. Since the late 1960s, South Koreans have lived through rapid urbanization, industrialization, military authoritarian rule, democratic reform, rising consumerism, and integration into the global capitalist economy. We will explore what it means to live through these changes, and what the consequences are for the diverse ways Koreans think about themselves, their family relations and their ethnic/national identity. Keeping in the mind the tensions and interrelationship between ideological constructs and lived experiences of gender, family and nation, we will consider a wide range of social contexts and structures which frame the lives of South Koreans today, including transformations in work and education; marriage and dating; consumerism and youth culture; historical legacies of colonialism, military rule and national division; and political and economic policies of globalization. We will also look at Korea's relationship with diasporic communities as a site for the construction of new meanings and practices of gender, family and national belonging.

ANTH 2670 HOW OTHERS SEE US 3.0 BASHKOW
TR 1400-1515

Each of us forms our individuality through relationships of difference and similarity with countless others, and such relationships also form collective identities like those associated with clans and tribes, nations, civilizations, and racial and ethnic groupings. In the course, we explore the diverse uses and cultural politics of otherness and difference, in part by looking at views of mainstream society from the margins, and views of the U.S. from abroad. This year's version of the course will emphasize perspectives on race in the U.S., among other topics. We will ask what others' views can (and can't) teach us about the anthropology of our own lives, as well as about the possibilities and pitfalls of cross-cultural understanding in general. Coursework will consist of reading, short assignments, papers, and exams. Students must enroll in one of the discussion sections (Anth 2670D).

ANTH 2820 EMERGENCE OF STATES & CITIES 3.0 WATTENMAKER
TR 1400-1515

This course explores the archaeology of early states and cities in both the Old (Mesopotamia and Egypt) and New (Teotihuacan, the Aztecs and the Maya) Worlds. We will discuss the ways that archaeologists learn about complex societies through fieldwork, laboratory research (including artifact analyses), texts, and ethnographic studies. Topics discussed include 1) the problematic concept of "civilization", 2) the origins of agriculture and its effects on society, 3) the shift from egalitarian societies to those with social ranking, 4) theories and evidence for the rise of state societies, 5) urbanism, 6) social, religious, political and economic life in early cities, 7) the beginnings of writing and 8) the collapse of complex societies. By highlighting the wide range of variability in pre-industrial societies, the course emphasizes the role of cultural values in shaping the organization of early societies. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement. It has been used in the past to satisfy requirements for Midde Eastern Studies and Latin American Studies (please check with the Program Director for approval).

ANTH 3010 HISTORY & THEORY 3.0 NELSON
TR 1100-1215

This course will provide a survey of anthropological theory from the late 19th-century up to the present. We will explore a diverse range of anthropological approaches developed over the course of the century, including: 19th-century evolutionism, Boasian cultural anthropology, British structural-functionalism, French structuralism, British symbolic anthropology, American cultural materialism and neo-evolutionism, later American cultural anthropology, feminism, and post-colonial and post-modern theories. We will be concerned to understand these approaches not only as theoretical frameworks for understanding other cultures, but also as cultural and historical productions, in themselves. The discussion session is obligatory. This is a required course for anthropology majors.

ANTH 3129 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILITY 3.0 SHEPHERD
MW 1500-1615

This course explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of mortality by gender, age, and class, the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

Anthro 101 or equivalent recommended as background. This is an advanced course, adding to general offerings in social organization, kinship, marriage, and gender. This course is cross-listed with women's studies. Upper level majors and non-majors. The course meets the Principle of Social Analysis requirement.

ANTH 3175 NATIVE AMERICAN ART: ASTOR COLLECTION 3.0 HANTMAN
R 1400-1630

 

This seminar will offer a critical review of the role of museums, exhibits and material objects in the representation of Native American culture. The course focuses on a particular collection of objects - the Astor Collection of Native American art - once exhibited in the Astor Hotel in Times Square, New York City in the early twentieth century and now curated by the University of Virginia Art Museum. We will examine the cultural practice of collecting in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the logic and purpose of displaying Native American crafts at that time. We will also examine the material culture itself seeking an understanding of the cultural context of its production from indigenous meanings to the effect of tourist market demands. The objects in the collection were produced by Native people throughout North America. Students in the seminar will develop a seminar paper (20 pages) examining one type of material culture in the collection or one aspect of the Astor Hotel exhibit historical context. This seminar is part of an ongoing project by students, museum staff and faculty at UVa to study the Astor Collection with the goal of developing a new exhibit which will re-examine the original display in the Astor Hotel.

ANTH 3274 DIVINE KINGS 3.0 SIIKALA
MW 1500-1615

This course is designed to introduce the student to the classic anthropological topic of divine kingship. Through examining literature on kingship the course also illustrates to the students major shifts in anthropological schools of thought and introduces them to some of the central theoretical concepts of political anthropology. In his great opus The Golden Bough (1911-1915), James Frazer describes a sovereign who is mystically linked to the land and the prosperity of his subjects and who must be killed to protect his divinity when it is threatened by symptoms of imperfection, such as bodily deformity, old age, or sexual impotence. Frazer saw the divine king as an important stage in the development of political authority and drew eclectic examples from numerous cultures around the world. Though Frasers evolutionistic and mentalist premises have been long abandoned, the figure of a sovereign whose power stems from a divine source and who stands as a dynamic center of the universe - and who is sometimes killed to preserve his divinity - persists as an important topic of anthropological analysis. Drawing from ethnographies of Europe, Africa, India, South-East Asia and the Pacific this course provides a comparative look at the discourse on divine kingship. Major themes include: regicide, diarchy, body fetishism, nature of political power, and the effects of colonialism on kingdoms based on divine authority.

ANTH 3340 ECOLOGY & SOCIETY 3.0 DAMON
MWF 1000-1050

This course attempts to 1) mediate the divide between the Arts and the Sciences; 2) introduce students new to anthropology aspects of culture theory and contemporary ecological/environmental anthropology; 3) forge a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology; 4) provide new insights on how human both fashion and are fashioned by their environments; 5) create a seminar-like context in which we can evaluate, as anthropologists and citizens of our world, aspects of the current environmental debate in our culture; and 6) facilitate independent study on environmental issues by each student. Although case studies will be drawn from throughout the world, there will be a stress on the social systems and environments triangulating South Asia, East Asia, and Australia, and the Americas. A dominant theme will be the relationships between climate and human culture. The course will be taught in two parts. Lectures based on readings will occupy every Monday and Wednesday. Fridays shall be devoted to a seminar-like format in which the class collectively discusses and each student reads one of several books mediating one or another aspect of the environmental debate dealing with both research and contemporary policy. An additional one hour discussion section is required part of this course. The course meets the Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 3370 POWER & THE BODY 3.0 MENTORE
TR 1100-1215

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced. This satisfies the second writing requirement.

ANTH 3490 LANGUAGE & THOUGHT 3.0 DANZIGER
MW 1000-1115

There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others to individuals? Can we learn about alternative ways of approaching the external world by studying other languages? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of recent cross-cultural psycholinguistic research. This class fulfills the Linguistics requirement for Anthropology and for Cognitive Science majors. It fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics majors.

ANTH 3559-1 CHANGING HINDU CULTURE & POLITICS 3.0 KHARE
M 1400-1630

An anthropological study of selected aspects and issues in the changing Hindu, society and politics, especially as extant under the diverse forces of and worldviews in contemporary India. After a general review of the Hindu worldview, the course will explicate and evaluate ongoing changes in (a) the Hindu family-caste-community structures across the "traditional-modern" changes; (b) the middle-class consumerism and religious life-style; (c) Hindu nationalism and the religious-political "tolerance-intolerance" issues; and (d) the Hindu Diaspora from India in the U. S.

ANTH 3559-2 LABORATORY METHODS IN ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 GEIB
TR 1230-1345

This upper-division course provides an overview of the analysis of archaeological materials with focused training on commonly recovered artifacts and other remains. The course is designed for advanced Anthropology majors, especially those continuing on to graduate study or a career in archaeology. Through instruction and hands-on experience students will learn about general analytical methods and techniques, data manipulation, and theory.

ANTH 3559-3 DIGITAL ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 BICKLER
TR 1530-1645

Computers have become a fundamental tool for archaeologists. We will look how information technology is being used to build models of the past by archaeologists and for other stakeholders in cultural heritage. This course explores the use of techniques such as information management, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Simulation, and 3D Visualization in archaeological theory and practice. From the analysis of artifacts through to sites and landscapes, to the opportunities provided by virtual and augmented reality technology.

ANTH 3559-4 APPLIED ANTHROPLOGY: ANTHROPOLOGY IN THE "REAL WORLD" 3.0 SNELL-ROOD
TR 0930-1045

So you can analyze culture-but outside of academic research how is anthropology practiced through policy, activism, and development? This class explores how has anthropology been used--and misused-to produce change. In the process, students will examine what constitutes ethical practiced anthropology: what happens to anthropological knowledge when applied, who should and should not use it, and what are its potential pitfalls and benefits. This class is ideal for students who enjoy anthropology but do not plan an academic career or for those who want to explore how social change can be produced through anthropological research.

ANTH 3559-5 ANTHROPOLOGY OF DISSENT 3.0 BONILLA
T 1530-1800

This course will investigate various processes of opposition, resistance, and revolution. The first half of the course will survey foundational works of revolutionary theory, while the second half will examine political practice from an ethnographic perspective, with an eye towards the lived experience of political participation and the formation (and transformation) of resisting subjects. We will consider these themes across a wide spectrum of movements and moments: from early Marxist, nationalist, and anti-colonial models of struggle to the more recent uprisings against global capitalism and neo-liberal policies in the US, Latin America, and Europe. The geographical focus will be global, emphasizing connections and influences across borders and epochs, while highlighting the connections between cultural politics in "the margins" and "the center". (Click here for the course syllabus. - a PDF file)

ANTH 3559-6 THE USE OF ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DAMON
MW 1500-1615

This course explores the role that anthropological thought might have in the construction of contemporary relations that transcend cultural boundaries. As a discipline anthropology now has nearly two centuries of experience focusing on the study of specific places and cultures. Yet one of the lessons that can be derived from that body of knowledge is that specific places are always dependent upon their minor or major ties to other cultural orders. This course will examine the nature of these regional relations, making intercultural action the centerpiece of attention. Taking various parts of the world one at a time-including East Asia, recent conflicts in the Middle East and Central Asia, Latin America and the modern international financial system-we shall collectively examine selective ethnographic monographs, intergovernmental relations, the impulses behind various State-sponsored (development) plans, and the actions of specific citizens, usually from the United States, as they participated in cross-cultural relations. Although all students will participate in readings defined for the class as a whole, each student, or set of students, will concentrate on a specific part of the globe preparing a set of essays that reviews the anthropological literature on that area, outlines the regions' place in some larger setting, and evaluates how at least one person from the US interacted in that region. Interaction with non-academic experts or visitations to organizations like the Rand Corporation will be part of the course format. This course will satisfy the Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 3559-7 RELIGION, RITUAL & SOCIETY 3.0 SIHLÉ
MW 1530-1645

This course is an exploration of major themes and theses of the anthropology of religion. Drawing from a broad sample of ethnographic texts (from short essays to book-length ethnographies) on religious forms ranging from so-called "world religions" to those of small-scale, non-literate societies, we will ask fundamental questions about religion and society, about ritual and religious practice, about religious worldviews and symbolism. We will learn to challenge the very categories that structure our common understandings of this subject, starting with the category of "religion" itself.

ANTH 3559-8 SOCIAL ROOTS OF NATURAL DISASTERS 3.0 MARSHALL
R 1800-2030

This course will explore the roots of disaster in historic, socio-cultural and political-economic terms, with particular attention to the on-going crisis in Haiti. What makes some people more vulnerable to disaster than others? How can we begin to understand the underlying causes of vulnerability in the world? Readings may include:

Mike Davis, 2002, Late Victorian Holocausts: El Nino Famines and the Making of the Third World, New York: Verso.
Eric Klinenberg, 2003, Heat Wave: The Social Autopsy of a Disaster, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Gregory Squires and Chester Hartman, Eds., There is No Such Thing as a Natural Disaster, New York: Routledge.
Rita Nakashima Brock and Rebecca Ann Parker, 2009, Saving Paradise: How Christianity Traded Love of This World for Crucifixion and Empire, Boston: Beacon Press.

ANTH 3600 SEX, GENDER, & CULTURE 3.0 MENAIR
TBA

This course examines the cultural construction of sexuality and gender from the perspective of various societies throughout the world. We will begin by disentangling the relationship between sex and gender, paying attention to the physiological differences between men and women and the cultural elaborations of male/female difference. We will next consider the relationship between gender and sexuality and examine how performances of gender identities vary cross-culturally. The course will then open into an exploration of how social and cultural constructions of gender signify beyond relations between men and women-to see how gender is connected to political economy and nationalism as well as colonial power and globalization. The last section of the course will return to a consideration of issues relating to sexuality and gender in American culture.

ANTH 3670 TIBET & HIMALAYAS 3.0 SIHLÉ
TR 1400-1515

This course aims at providing a balanced, anthropological outlook on a complex and culturally diverse area, on which the West and others have massively projected their own fantasies: Tibet and the Himalayas. We will learn to mistrust these myths and will develop an understanding of these societies both in their own terms and by relating Tibetan and Himalayan ethnography to larger anthropological issues and debates. The main topics investigated shall include ethnicity, social and political organization, and religious forms; we will also engage in a thorough discussion of recent political developments. The course materials will center on academic articles and books, but will include also biography, news articles, fiction, poetry, and films.

ANTH 3885 ARCHAEOLOGY OF EUROPE 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
MWF 1100-1150

This lecture course engages topics in the archaeology of Europe spanning the Paleolithic to the Iron Age, including: the first peopling of Europe and the Neanderthal question; early modern humanity, theories of cave art, and other social and cultural developments; the emergence of settled villages and towns; the fluorescence of Neolithic earthworks and henges; encounters between Romans and other Europeans; political networks, palaces, and urban centers of the Bronze Age and later; and post-Roman societies including the Vikings.

ANTH 4559-2 ARCHAEOLOGY OF POLYNESIAN CHIEFDOMS 3.0 BICKLER
W 1700-1930

The course investigates the appearance of the "Lapita" cultural complex and looks at the evidence for social ranking in ancestral populations. It follows the different trajectories of chiefdoms in the Pacific islands including Hawaii, Easter Island and New Zealand, and the building of marae, ahu and heiau. We also looks at the role Polynesian chieftainship has played in models of the anthropological study of hierarchy, both in the Pacific and other regions. The course examines how archaeological data relating to social ranking is identified and often mis-identified in the archaeological record using examples from the Pacific.

ANTH 4559-3 FRENCH CARIBBEAN CULTURAL & INTELLECTUAL CURRENTS 3.0 BONILLA
R 1530-1800

This interdisciplinary co-taught course will combine historical, anthropological, and literary approaches to the study of the French Caribbean islands. We will examine important periods in the history of French territorial expansion (including colonialism, slavery, decolonization, and the transformation of empire) with an eye towards how these histories informed the cultural and quotidian world of life in the Caribbean Colonies. We will also examine how varying ideological currents and philosophical projects (such as Negritude, Antillanité, Creolité, and the Tout-Monde) have sought to navigate the complicated relationships of alterity, political community, and national belonging that have shaped the French postcolonial world. Throughout the course we will examine the French Caribbean as an important analytical site for the study of racial hierarchies, colonial histories, and postcolonial projects. (Click here for the course syllabus. - a PDF file.)

ANTH 4559-5 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS II 3.0 NEIMAN
M 1600-1830

This is a second course in statistical methods useful in many disciplines, including archaeology, anthropology, and environmental sciences. The goal is to equip students with statistical skills useful in analyzing empirical variation, deciphering links to the environmental and historical contexts in which that variation occurs, and using the results to advance scientific understanding. Coverage includes probability distributions, basics of maximum-likelihood and Bayesian estimation, linear and generalized-linear models, non-parametric smoothing, multivariate distances, Mantel regression, and ordination methods (principle components, correspondence analysis, and multidimensional scaling). The course emphasizes practical data analysis using SAS and R. Prerequisite: an introductory course in statistical data analysis.

ANTH 4991 HISTORICAL ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE FAMILY CLASS 3.0 SHEPHERD
TR 9:30-10:45

This seminar will look at the varieties of marriage found cross-culturally and historically. Includes examination of polygyny and polyandry, Goody's theory of the historical origins of the European marriage system, legal controversies over recognition of same sex marriages. Course Satisfies Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 4991 SOCIAL LIFE OF GOODS & MATERIALS 3.0 WATTENMAKER
W 1500-1730

Drawing on theoretical works in the social sciences, archaeological case studies, and ethnographies, this course examines the diverse ways that cultures have used materials and goods to create and transform their worlds. The course takes an inclusive view of material culture that considers settlements, houses, burials and shrines, as well as objects. We consider how the productive context, exchange of goods, physical properties of materials, and their cultural uses endows them with spiritual and social meanings. Topics covered include the use of goods in negotiating social relations, the circulation of goods, gifts and commodities, craft production as ritual, bodies as objects, body adornment, dress, gender and identity, and consumption and globalization. Archaeological examples highlight the roles of tradition and history in the uses of durable goods over generations and across space, providing significant theoretical insights into how goods are infused with social meanings. Ethnographic cases allow us to consider more perishable goods and provide richer documentation of the social roles of goods in the daily lives of people. A cross-cultural perspective that draws on the social uses of goods in various parts of the world furthers our understanding of how goods lacking in intrinsic value take on powerful social meanings.

ANTH 4991 ETHNOGRAPHY OF BLACKS IN 20TH CENTURY 3.0 MARSHALL
TR 1100-1215

The course will explore the discursive construction of black life in works of anthropology, sociology, theology and fiction. Beginning with Du Bois's Philadelphia Negro, the course will examine the theoretical underpinnings and analytic frames through which black life is variously understood and map how conceptions of black life shift across the century. A specific focus of the course is the fraught relationship between blacks and modernity, and the struggle for civil rights.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate courses:

ANTH 5040 LINGUISTICS FIELD METHODS 3.0 DOBRIN
M 1700-1930

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include papers on the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the language (the precise nature of the assignment may vary depending on the particular language being studied. The course fulfills the Structure of a Language requirement for linguistics majors and M.A. students.

ANTH 5200: THE HISTORY OF KINSHIP STUDIES 3.0 MCKINNON
TBA

This course explores the development of kinship studies in anthropology from 19th century evolutionary theorists through the classic kinship studies of the 20th century­including British descent theory, French alliance theory, and American cultural theory—to more recent developments relating to “house societies” and “cultures of relatedness.” The course is a critical appreciation of a body of literature that has been central to the development of anthropological theory for over 100 years. It seeks to understand how these “scientific” theories were culturally constituted, what the analytic consequences were of their particular cultural and historical configurations, and what their relation was to discourses of social in/equality and narratives of evolution, development, and modernization.

ANTH 5360 WORLD MENTAL HEALTH 3.0 MERKEL
W 1800-2030

The purpose of this class is to bring together social science and medically oriented students to try and learn from and with each other about the role of culture in mental illness. There is an increasing realization that mental health issues are among the most frequent public health issues facing the world today. Yet it is also becoming clear that present day health care system, including psychiatry, is not prepared to meet this need. Many question the appropriateness and effectiveness of western based mental health care in non-western societies. On the other hand, some of the largest barriers to adequate mental health care are cultural. Both social science, especially anthropology, and biomedical science, including psychiatry, have valuable perspectives on these issues and both are needed, if the world is to improve the quality of life for those with mental illness. However, this is a very complicated area and historically anthropologic and psychiatric perspectives have not always been compatible. It is therefore hoped that this course may contribute to the increasing dialogue that is occurring in this area. This course will examine mental health issues from the perspectives of both biomedicine and anthropology, emphasizing local traditions of illness and healing as well as evidence from epidemiology and neurobiology. Included topics will be psychosis, depression, PTSD, Culture Bound Syndromes, and suicide. We will also examine the role of pharmaceutical companies in the spread of western based mental health care and culturally sensitive treatment efforts, combining western biomedical treatments with traditional methods.

ANTH 5430 AFRICAN LANGUAGE STRUCTURES 3.0 CONTINI-MORAVA
TR 1400-1545

An introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. For about three-fourths of the course we will discuss linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax) among a wide variety of languages; the classification of African languages; and the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory. For the last fourth of the course we will address a range of sociolinguistic topics, including language and social identity, social functions of language, verbal art, the politics of language planning, and the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth. While lectures address general and comparative topics, each student will choose one language to focus on, using published materials available in the library. This language will be the basis for the major assignments. Some prior experience with linguistics is desirable (such as LNGS 3250/7010, ANTH 2400 or ANTH 7400), but the course will also be accessible to highly motivated students who have not taken a previous linguistics course. The course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

ANTH 5470 LANGUAGE AND IDENTITIY 3.0 LEFKOWITZ
M 1400-1630

This seminar explores the relationship between language and identity. In anthropology, where identity has become a central concern, language is seen as an important site for the construction of, and negotiation over social identities. In linguistics, reference to categories of social identity helps to explain language structure and change. The course explores the overlap between these converging trends by focusing on the notion of discourse as a nexus of cultural and linguistic processes related to identity. Readings will juxtapose social theoretic with linguistic treatments of identity, toward identifying theoretical frameworks that generate promising means for investigating and describing the phenomenon of identity.

Prerequisite: some coursework in both anthropology and linguistics; or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 5559-1 MYTHODOLOGY 3.0 WAGNER
TR 1230-1345

This course offers experience in using and understanding a very simple format for the analysis of a myth or story (any myth or story), called obviation. Following an introductory explanation, students will each select one or more myths or stories, and present and explain its obviation in class. Grading will be based on the student's expertise in doing so. The course grade is based on a final paper plus class participation.

ANTH 5529-2 GLOBALIZING & INEQUALITIES 3.0 KHARE
W 1400-1630

A seminar on comparatively studying the complicating effects of globalization on the social, religious and health related inequalities in selected societies and cultures across the developed and developing worlds. After a discussion of transnational conceptual, methodological and issue-specific concerns (e.g. in the cultural worlds of India and the U.S.), the course will conduct student-led workshops on the increasingly problematic impact of globalization on specific socioeconomic inequalities, religious differences, human displacements, and health care issues.

ANTH 5529-3 COMMUNITAS, FLOW & ZONE 3.0 TURNER
R 7:00-9:30

Communitas is a social phenomenon occurring apparently at random throughout human society-recognizable as a group's pleasure in sharing common experiences, a sense of intermingling flow between people, a time of lucid mutual understanding. The class will research the circumstances that produce communitas and conduct local field research to engage in it, whether in rites of passage, in collective musical occasions, in times of stress, and the like. We will follow the connection that Victor Turner made between liminal stages in the processes of society and the consciousness of communitas and antistructure, using his article, "Betwixt and Between" and books, The Ritual Process and Dramas, Fields, and Metaphors, with consideration of Buber and Bakhtin, the early Marx, the religions, nature along with environmentalism, and violent and non-violent "human rights" revolutions. Communitas can be easily spotted in its many variations-for instance, "Zone," music, rush hour collective work occasions, and even disasters. It often appears unexpectedly, transcending psychological and sociological definitions. Held at 107 Carrsbrook Drive.

ANTH 5589 SPECIAL TOPICS: HOUSEHOLD ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
W 1400-1630

This seminar will explore numerous dimensions in the archaeology of houses and households, drawing from a wide array of research areas and periods. Household archaeology provides insights into daily life, gender roles, belief systems, kinship, and other social and economic structures, as well as providing ideal points of comparison between different kinds and scales of settlements in an ancient landscape. This course is designed for graduate students and upper-level undergraduates with experience in archaeology courses.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 7020 CURRENT THEORY 3.0 MENTORE
T 1530-1800

The course continues the agenda of ANTH 7010, exploring the history of anthropological theory up to our own times. The course is principally for Anthropology graduate students in their first year, for whom it is a requirement, but it is also open to all interested graduate students at the University.

ANTH 7110 PAPER & PRESENTATION 3.0 METCALF
R 1830-2100

This workshop is designed for second-year anthropology graduate students as they prepare the MA-qualifying exercise.

ANTH 7129 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILTIY 3.0 SHEPHERD
MW 1500-1615

This course explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of mortality by gender, age, and class, the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 7370 POWER & THE BODY 3.0 MENTORE
TR 1100-1215

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced.

ANTH 7400 LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DANZIGER
W 1400-1630

This is an advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically oriented research. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in perception and world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, universals and particulars in language, language in history and prehistory, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation, and the study of poetic language. Through readings and discussion, the implications of each of these topics for the general conduct of anthropology will be addressed. Evaluation is based on take-home essays and problem-sets which are assigned throughout the semester. The course is required for Anthropology graduate students. It fulfills the Theory requirement for graduate students in Linguistics.

ANTH 7559 FRENCH CARIBBEAN CULTURAL & INTELLECTUAL CURRENTS 3.0 BONILLA
R 1530-1800

This interdisciplinary co-taught course will combine historical, anthropological, and literary approaches to the study of the French Caribbean islands. We will examine important periods in the history of French territorial expansion (including colonialism, slavery, decolonization, and the transformation of empire) with an eye towards how these histories informed the cultural and quotidian world of life in the Caribbean Colonies. We will also examine how varying ideological currents and philosophical projects (such as Negritude, Antillanité, Creolité, and the Tout-Monde) have sought to navigate the complicated relationships of alterity, political community, and national belonging that have shaped the French postcolonial world. Throughout the course we will examine the French Caribbean as an important analytical site for the study of racial hierarchies, colonial histories, and postcolonial projects.

ANTH 7559 ARCHAEOLOGY OF POLYNESIAN CHIEFDOMS 3.0 BICKLER
W 1700-1930

The course investigates the appearance of the "Lapita" cultural complex and looks at the evidence for social ranking in ancestral populations. It follows the different trajectories of chiefdoms in the Pacific islands including Hawaii, Easter Island and New Zealand, and the building of marae, ahu and heiau. We also looks at the role Polynesian chieftainship has played in models of the anthropological study of hierarchy, both in the Pacific and other regions. The course examines how archaeological data relating to social ranking is identified and often mis-identified in the archaeological record using examples from the Pacific.

ANTH 7559 DIGITAL ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 BICKLER
TR 1530-1645

Computers have become a fundamental tool for archaeologists. We will look how information technology is being used to build models of the past by archaeologists and for other stakeholders in cultural heritage. This course explores the use of techniques such as information management, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Simulation, and 3D Visualisation in archaeological theory and practice. From the analysis of artefacts through to sites and landscapes, to the opportunities provided by virtual and augmented reality technology.

ANTH 7559 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS II 3.0 NEIMAN
M 1600-1830

This is a second course in statistical methods useful in many disciplines, including archaeology, anthropology, and environmental sciences. The goal is to equip students with statistical skills useful in analyzing empirical variation, deciphering links to the environmental and historical contexts in which that variation occurs, and using the results to advance scientific understanding. Coverage includes probability distributions, basics of maximum-likelihood and Bayesian estimation, linear and generalized-linear models, non-parametric smoothing, multivariate distances, Mantel regression, and ordination methods (principlecomponents, correspondence analysis, and multidimensional scaling). The course emphasizes practical data analysis using SAS and R. Prerequisite: an introductory course in statistical data analysis.