1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Spring 2011

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics
2240, 2280, 2360, 2365, 2590-001, 2590-100, 3129,3272, 3300, 3340,
3590-1,3590-2,3600, 4590-1, 5360, 5395, 5528,5529-2

2153,2156,2500-1, 2500-2,2590-004,3590-3,3590-4, 3590-5, 5529-1

2559-2,2820,2589, 3559,3885,
4840,5589,5885
2400,2430,2559-300,3450,3480,
5420,5542,5549

Major Requirements
3010
Non-Western perspectives for the majors
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern equirement)
1010,2153, 2156, 2400,2500-1,2500-2,3590-3,3590-4,3590-5, 5529-1
Senior Seminars
4991-1, 4991-2, 4991-3

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 1010 INTRO. TO ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 BONILLA
MW 1100-1150

This course introduces the student to some general topics of interest in cultural anthropology. Through readings, films, lectures and discussions student should come to an understanding of the extent of human diversity. We explore what anthropologists mean by "culture" and the methodology most associated with cultural anthropology, fieldwork. A number of societies from around the world provide examples of different practices regarding the meaning of "progress," language and belief, patterns of family relations, the social construction of identity, and the question of "race." We look at other cultures to develop an appreciation of cultural diversity and cultural relativism. However, the anthropological method is comparative, and the aim of anthropology is always to know our own culture better. Satisfies College's Non-Western Perspective Requirement

ANTH 2153 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS 3.0 WOOD
MW 1400-1515

This class is intended to introduce students to the wide variety of cultures and the diversity of historical experiences of Native Americans. After a review of topics in American Indian history, the course will review contemporary issues of concern to Native groups in the U.S. Throughout the course we will consider how Indians and Indian history have been portrayed in popular media by both indigenous and non-indigenous writers, artists, academics, political activists and others. Issues of contemporary political action and sovereignty will also be reviewed.

ANTH 2156 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF AFRICA 3.0 OSOTSI
MWF 1300-1350

This course explores the cultures of various African peoples through a variety of sources -ethnographies, films, narratives and literatures. The course focuses on how Africa has been represented since the pre-colonial era, how the images and ideas formed through the representations of Africa have impacted knowledge about Africa, and explores issues that are relevant to an understanding of contemporary African societies. We will draw on the ethnographies to survey pre-colonial Africa, economic and social effects of colonialism, rural-urban migrations, self-representations and present-day violence in African societies. In conjunction with ethnographic readings and literatures, we will explore how popular views have influenced and continue to shape anthropological knowledge, Western representations of Africa, and Africans' representations of themselves. The course requires the students to question their basic perspectives, assumptions and biases regarding African cultures.

ANTH 2240 PROGRESS 3.0 METCALF
MW 1600-1650

Since the Enlightenment, Westerners have been deeply attached to the idea of progress. In the nineteenth century, rapid technological development inspired an almost limitless confidence in the upward progress of humanity, expressed in theories of social evolution. These same theories, however, introduced a sombre note of extinction for those left behind. This course addresses a series of questions about our notion of progress: what are its ideological roots? How is technical progress related to social or moral progress? What anxieties now undermine our confidence in progress?

ANTH 2280 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DOUGLASS
MWF 1000-1050

Medical Anthropology is a growing and important new subfield within general anthropology. Medical Anthropology compares different cultures' ideas about illness and curing. Although disease is a concept referring to a pathological condition of the body in which functioning is disturbed, illness is a cultural concept: a condition marked by deviation from what is considered a normal, healthy state. Treatment of illness in Western industrial societies focuses on curing specific diseased organs or controlling a specific virus. In many so-called "traditional" societies greater emphasis is placed on the social and psychological dimensions of illness. In this course we will learn that different cultures, even in the United States (i.e., Hispanic, Asian, American Indian, African American, etc.), have different ways to talk about illness, and that the American medical community is at times as "culture bound" as anywhere. "Science" does not stand outside culture.

ANTH 2360 DON JUAN AND CASTANEDA 3.0 WAGNER
TR 0930-1045

The six books of Carlos Castaneda represent what is perhaps an anthropological ideal--a world in which the native's concepts of power, sorcery, and transformation are "real" rather than the social systems, adaptations, and symbolic processes generally used to explain them. They are not ethnography; in his latest preface Castaneda prefers to treat them as "autobiography." Yet they can be used very effectively to illustrate a wide range of concepts in anthropology and traditional religions, which is what this course is all about. It will not teach you to fly--it may teach you to write--but it will hopefully help you to understand how anthropologists think. The course will be given in an open seminar format, with discussion encouraged. Grades will be based on 3 papers.

ANTH 2365 ART AND ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DOUGLASS
MW 1530-1645

The course will emphasize art in small-scale (contemporary) societies (sometimes called ethnic art or "primitive art"). It will include a survey of aesthetic productions of major areas throughout the world (Australia, Africa, Oceania, Native America, Meso-America). We will also read about and discuss such issues as art and cultural identity, tourist arts, anonymity, authenticity, the question of universal aesthetic cannons, exhibiting cultures, the difference between the bellas artes and arte popular, and the impact of globalization on these arts.

ANTH 2400 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 3.0 CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 1100-1150

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics
include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

ANTH 2430 LANGUAGES OF THE WORLD 3.0 DOBRIN
MW 1000-1050

Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor. This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language.

ANTH 2500-001 MAYA WORLD 3.0 RODRIGUEZ
MWF 1200-1250

This course covers fundamental aspects of both ancient and current Maya culture. We will go through the basics of Mayan history and the most relevant features of the Maya civilization, such as the Mayan calendar, the Mayan writing system, and Mayan spirituality. We will also explore some of the most fascinating ethnographies of current Mayan cultures, as well as the socio-political context in which Maya people live nowadays.

ANTH 2500-002 HAITI 30 LAHATTE
MWF 1000-1050

The goal of this course is to examine Haiti's current position through an exploration of historical and contemporary texts, with a particular aim toward contextualizing the recent earthquake within a broader, holistic perspective that situates Haiti in both the Caribbean region and the world system.

ANTH 2559-002 HUNTER-GATHERER ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 GEIB
TR 1400-1515

Not until about 12,000 years ago did humans start to become food producers. For most of our career a foraging way of life was universal. Through the evolution of anatomically and behaviorally modern humans we gathered plants and animals and hunted game from the "natural" environment like other species. What was it like to live this way and how and why have lifeways changed? This course tries to answer these questions and to provide an understanding of the methodological and theoretical issues that accompany the archaeological study of prehistoric foragers. "Windows" to the past include (1) ethnographies of contemporary and recent hunter-gatherers that document the diversity of forager lifeways, (2) models and theories from behavioral ecology, especially as applied to recent hunter-gatherers, as one means to investigate forager behavior and explain change , and (3) research among primates such as chimpanzees. We will explore each of these topics along with representative archaeological studies of technology, subsistence, settlement, social structure, and site formation processes.

ANTH 2559-300 NARRATIVE AND SOCIAL LIFE 3.0 BECHTER
MW 1300-1350

From Arabian Nights to Star Wars to presidential campaigning, narrating a good story that people can project themselves into is at the center of cultural life. But narrative goes well beyond entertainment and conscious identification. It shapes the way we see. It is also just one form of social representation that does so. This course examines the social-interactive nature of narrative, and considers how forms of narrative produce and can also challenge cultural meaning. To understand the power of narrative, we survey key analytic approaches, several non-Western contexts, and some activities not typically associated with narrative. Students will apply concepts such as textuality, voicing, and genre in field projects covering a range of narrative situations.

ANTH 2589 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY: WAR AND PEACE IN PREHISTORY (3) PHIL GEIB
TR 4:30-5:20

Why the apparent human penchant for killing our own kind? Daily reminders of carnage in various corners of the world testify that this is no idle curiosity. Margaret Mead famously asserted that the institution of war was invented at a relatively recent interval in social evolution. Although not a biological necessity, warfare might have been a behavioral option that was part of the human condition from the very beginning, present among our earliest ancestors. This course will review and evaluate various theories about the origin or causes of war. We will examine the cross-cultural variation in the practice of war among non-state societies as known from ethnography and from archaeology. We will also consider the consequences of war for human society.

ANTH 2590-001 BLACKNESS 3.0 MENTORE
TR 1530-1645

This course focuses upon racially conscious societies. It attempts to teach not only about the categories and relations productive of racial consciousness, but also about the lived experiences of being specifically "Black" in racial socialities. Historically, in the discipline of anthropology, the issues pertaining to racial difference drove much in its foundational arguments to become "scientific," "rational," and "just." In other words, the absence of this topic in any anthropology negatively reflects on its commitment to foundational ideas and basic tenets of scholarship. The focus on "Blackness" here merely seeks to recapture the principal category of difference configured by the discipline, yet is frequently misrepresented by its efforts at documentation.

ANTH 2590-004 IDENTITY AND IMMIGRATION IN SPAIN 3.0 MILLS
TR 09:30-10:45

Common perceptions of Spain often regard its people and cultural topography as homogenous in nature, with flamenco and bullfighting at its center. This course will challenge such assumptions and consider the questions, "What is Spain?" and "What does it mean to be Spanish?" in the contemporary context. It will approach these questions with a look at older ethnographies from the mid-20th century, but largely focus on contemporary migration flows to Spain that have complicated identity questions as well as the legal infrastructure for migration. These issues will also be considered within the context of Europe, where migration in recent years has caused acute challenges to the political and cultural landscape of many European states.

ANTH 2590-100 SPACE AND PLACE IN ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 NELSON
TR 1230-1345

This course is concerned with how we culturally construct, produce, and represent space, and how space in turn shapes us. Through the theoretical schools of symbolic anthropology, political economy, and post-structuralist geography, we will study the social meaning of space-related concepts, such as the built environment, landscape, migration, territory, and place.

ANTH 2820 EMERGENCE OF STATE & CITIES 3.0 WATTENMAKER
MW 1400-1515

This course explores the archaeology of early states and cities in both the Old (Mesopotamia and Egypt) and New (Teotihuacan, the Aztecs and the Maya) Worlds. We will discuss the ways that archaeologists learn about complex societies through fieldwork, laboratory research (including artifact analyses), texts, and ethnographic studies. Topics discussed include 1) the problematic concept of "civilization", 2) the origins of agriculture and its effects on society, 3) the shift from egalitarian societies to those with social ranking, 4) theories and evidence for the rise of state societies, 5) urbanism, 6) social, religious, political and economic life in early cities, 7) the beginnings of writing and 8) the collapse of complex societies. By highlighting the wide range of variability in pre-industrial societies, the course emphasizes the role of cultural values in shaping the organization of early societies. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement. It has been used in the past to satisfy requirements for Midde Eastern Studies and Latin American Studies (please check with the Program Director for approval).

ANTH 3010 THEORY & HISTORY ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 MCKINNON
TR 1100-1215

This course will provide a survey of anthropological theory from the late 19th-century up to the present. We will explore a diverse range of anthropological approaches developed over the course of the century, including: 19th-century evolutionism, Boasian cultural anthropology, British structural-functionalism, French structuralism, British symbolic anthropology, American cultural materialism and neo-evolutionism, later American cultural anthropology, feminism, and post-colonial and post-modern theories. We will be concerned to understand these approaches not only as theoretical frameworks for understanding other cultures, but also as cultural and historical productions, in themselves. The discussion session is obligatory. This is a required course for anthropology majors.

ANTH 3129 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILITY 3.0 SHEPHERD
TR 1400-1515

This course explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of mortality by gender, age, and class, the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

Anthro 101 or equivalent recommended as background. This is an advanced course, adding to general offerings in social organization, kinship, marriage, and gender. This course is cross-listed with women's studies. Upper level majors and non-majors. The course meets the Principle of Social Analysis requirement.

ANTH 3272 ANTHROPOLOGY OF DISSENT 3.0 BONILLA
W 1530-1800

This course will investigate various processes of opposition, resistance, and revolution. The first half of the course will survey foundational works of revolutionary theory, while the second half will examine political practice from an ethnographic perspective, with an eye towards the lived experience of political participation and the formation (and transformation) of resisting subjects. We will consider these themes across a wide spectrum of movements and moments: from early Marxist, nationalist, and anti-colonial models of struggle to the more recent uprisings against global capitalism and neo-liberal policies in the US, Latin America, and Europe. The geographical focus will be global, emphasizing connections and influences across borders and epochs, while highlighting the connections between cultural politics in "the margins" and "the center".

ANTH 3300 TOURNAMENTS & ATHLETES 3.0 MENTORE
TR 1100-1215

This course will offer you a cross-cultural study of competitive games. Criticizing current theories about the "innocence" of sports while comparing and contrasting various athletic events from societies around the world, it will provide an argument to explain the competitive bodily displays of athletes. The materials will allow you to examine bodily movement, meaning, context, and process, in addition to the relations between athletes, officials, spectators, and social systems. Its general thesis will be that sport brings out the universal morals of community, challenges and tests them in controlled and unthreatening genres, yet never defeats them or makes them appear unjust.

ANTH 3340 ECOLOGY AND SOCIETY 3.0 DAMON
MWF 1000-1050

This course attempts to 1) mediate the divide between the Arts and the Sciences; 2) introduce students new to anthropology aspects of culture theory and contemporary ecological/environmental anthropology; 3) forge a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology; 4) provide new insights on how human both fashion and are fashioned by their environments; 5) create a seminar-like context in which we can evaluate, as anthropologists and citizens of our world, aspects of the current environmental debate in our culture; and 6) facilitate independent study on environmental issues by each student. Although case studies will be drawn from throughout the world, there will be a stress on the social systems and environments triangulating South Asia, East Asia, and Australia, and the Americas. A dominant theme will be the relationships between climate and human culture. The course will be taught in two parts. Lectures based on readings will occupy every Monday and Wednesday. Fridays shall be devoted to a seminar-like format in which the class collectively discusses and each student reads one of several books mediating one or another aspect of the environmental debate dealing with both research and contemporary policy. An additional one hour discussion section is required part of this course. The course meets the Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 3590-1 COLONIALISM 3.0 LIM
TR 0930-1045

This course explores colonialism as an ideoloical project and as a set of practices and power relations that impacted the lives of both colonized and colonizer. Not intended to provide an overall history of colonialism, this course draws on examples and accounts of specific practices and events to illustrate how the colonial project was understood, how it operated, and the effects it produced. Topic (i.e.,period and region) may vary by semester.

ANTH 3590-2 USES OF CONTEMPORARY ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DAMON
MW 15:30-16:45

This course explores the role anthropological knowledge might have in constructing relations within our own and across cultural boundaries. Tending to a seminar format, lectures and class readings will sample specific regions and the US' relations to those locales. The regions, hotspots in the contemporary world, will include Afghanistan, China and Iraq and our own contemporary Financial/Social crisis. Although participating in the syllabus as a whole, each student will develop an expertise in a specific place while focusing on a more limited topic or engagement with that region. Possible topics and institutions to explore might include financial and military reform, the State Department, Rand Corporation, the place of movies in forging intercultural consciousness.
 

ANTH 3590-3 GENDER SEXUALITY AND NATION IN SOUTH KOREA 3.0 FREEMAN
MW 1500-1615

This course looks at the way South Korean men and women have refashioned their everyday lives amidst the radical and turbulent changes of the past century. Since liberation from colonial rule, South Koreans have lived through rapid urbanization, industrialization, military authoritarian rule, democratic reform, rising consumerism, and integration into the global economy. We will explore what it means to have lived through these changes and what the consequences are for the diverse ways Koreans think about their gender, sexual and ethnic/national identities. We will consider a wide range of social contexts and structures which frame the lives of South Koreans past and present, including the historical legacies of colonialism, national division, military rule, American neo-imperialism, transformations in parenting, care-giving, marriage, sexuality, consumerism, and global capitalism. We will also look at South Korea¹s relationship with its diasporic communities as a site for the construction of new meanings and practices of gender, sexuality and nation.

ANTH 3590-4 HEALTH AND HEALING IN AFRICA 3.0 NICHOLS-BELO
MW 1400-1515

Health and Healing in Africa examines the historical, social, political, and economic issues that produce poor health outcomes for many Africans. Exploring such topics as HIV/AIDS, maternal/child health, malaria, and malevolent witchcraft, we will examine local understandings of what it means to be healthy and to be ill. Finally, we will investigate biomedical, 'traditional', and religious healing as practiced in a variety of African contexts. Course content will include ethnographic and historical texts, as well as feature films and documentaries.

ANTH 3590-5 DEVELOPMENT AND CULTURE IN AFRICA 3.0 TERNI
MW 1530-1645

This class examines a series of African development projects (including large dams in Lesotho and Mozambique, Tanzania's Ujamaa program, and South Africa's One Million Homes initiative). We question the impact of cultural difference on development and vice versa, as well as considering whether or not "development" might be a culture unto itself. We draw on ethnography, contemporary development theory, and critiques of development approaches.

ANTH 3600 SEX, GENDER AND CULTURE 3.0 NICHOLS-BELO
MW 1100-1150

Sex, Gender, and Culture seeks to engage students in thinking critically about western notions of gender and sex as a rigid binary. In exploring the ways that sex and gender are constructed in different cultural settings, the course aims to de-naturalize sex and gender as categories. Cross-cultural examples drawn from films and texts serve both as a basis of comparison and as a means of making visible contemporary American cultural debates of topics such as gay marriage and assisted reproduction. This class meets as a lecture on Monday and Wednesday and students take an additional mandatory discussion section.

ANTH 3885 ARCHAEOLOGY OF EUROPE 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
MWF 1100-1150

This lecture course covers a selection of topics in the archaeology of Europe that cross-cut time periods, regions, and major transformations including: the peopling of Europe and the Neanderthal debate; the interpretation of rock art and other early modern cultural achievements; the emergence and eventual dominance of sedentary living; the phenomena of Neolithic henges and earthworks; further stratification of society and economic and political networks, palaces, and urban centers of the Bronze Age; the relationship of transformations in Europe to those in the Near East; the Mediterranean and Aegean worlds; the Roman impact on western Europe and the life of Barbarian Europe; the Iron Age; and the Vikings and their contemporaries.

ANTH 4590 ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS 3.0 LORIMER
M 1530-1800

Ethnography can seem a dauntingly mystified task. Yet it is performed mostly through concrete linguistic practice, which can be pinned down & analyzed. Exploiting such analyses, students will rehearse major genres of research design, including problem-construction & IRB negotiation, & consider various techniques for advancing one's research agenda in the field. Students must be, or become, engaged in a local or long-distance ethnographic project.

ANTH 4840 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 MOST
F 0930-1200

This course provides an introduction to the use of analytical procedures, database applications, statistics, and quantitative methods in archaeology and anthropology. Analytical techniques used to generate, describe, and analyze archaeological and anthropological data sets are emphasized but experience has shown that students in sociology, psychology, and nursing have little problem applying the statistical methods learned to their own data sets. The course focuses on research design, database construction, hypothesis testing, probability and sampling, and univariate statistics. No prior knowledge of statistics is necessary; background in anthropology, archaeology, or a related field is required.

ANTH 4991-001 PREHISTORY AND ORIGINS OF SOCIAL INEQUALITY 3.0 PLOG
TR 1100-1215

In this course we'll read and discuss both archaeological and ethnographic literature that addresses key questions about how and why social inequality evolved from the egalitarian societies that generally characterized human societies for hundreds of thousands of years. As social inequality is often tied to political and religious inequality, thus these dimensions of human societies will also be considered. Course assignments will include 3-4 short papers (4-8 pages) as well as discussion of weekly readings.

ANTH 4991-002 GLOBALIZING INEQUALITIES 3.0 KHARE
R 1300-1530

A discussion of such social inequalities as class, caste, race, age, and gender under globalization for producing increasingly problematic transnational socio-economic forces, faces, demands and conditions, with a focus on India, America and the European region. The illustrative case studies issues will include: (a) the position of minority and marginal groups under natural and/or man-made disasters; (b) the farmers and food consumption; (c) inequalities/disparities in health care; and (d) religious differences under globalization.

ANTH 4991-003 SOCIAL LIFE OF GOODS & MATERIALS 3.0 WATTENMAKER
M 1600-1830

Drawing on theoretical works in the social sciences, archaeological case studies, and ethnographies, this course examines the diverse ways that cultures have used materials and goods to create and transform their worlds. The course takes an inclusive view of material culture that considers settlements, houses, burials and shrines, as well as objects. We consider how the productive context, exchange of goods, physical properties of materials, and their cultural uses endows them with spiritual and social meanings. Topics covered include the use of goods in negotiating social relations, the circulation of goods, gifts and commodities, craft production as ritual, bodies as objects, body adornment, dress, gender and identity, and consumption and globalization. Archaeological examples highlight the roles of tradition and history in the uses of durable goods over generations and across space, providing significant theoretical insights into how goods are infused with social meanings. Ethnographic cases allow us to consider more perishable goods and provide richer documentation of the social roles of goods in the daily lives of people. A cross-cultural perspective that draws on the social uses of goods in various parts of the world furthers our understanding of how goods lacking in intrinsic value take on powerful social meanings.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate Courses:

ANTH 5360 WORLD MENTAL HEALTH 3.0 MERKEL
W 6:30-9:00

This course will examine mental health issues from the perspectives of biomedicine and anthropology, emphasizing local traditions of illness and healing as well as evidence from epidemiology and neurobiology. Included topics will be psychosis, depression, PTSD, Culture Bound Syndromes, and suicide. We will also examine the role of pharmaceutical companies in the spread of western based mental health care and culturally sensitive treatment.

ANTH 5395 MYTHODOLOGY 3.0 WAGNER
TR 1230-1345

This course offers experience in using and understanding a very simple format for the analysis of a myth or story (any myth or story), called obviation. Following an introductory explanation, students will each select one or more myths or stories, and present and explain its obviation in class. Grading will be based on the student's expertise in doing so. The course grade is based on a final paper plus class participation.

ANTH 5401 LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS 3.0 CONTINI-MORAVA
M 1700-1930

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include one paper on phonology, one on morphology, and one on syntax (the nature of the assignment may vary depending on the particular language being studied).

ANTH 5440 MORPHOLOGY 3.0 DOBRIN
TBA, probably T 1530-1800

This course provides an overview of recent morphological theory, focusing on recurring themes that have arisen as the subfield has sought to find its place within the generative paradigm. The issues we will cover fall mainly into two broad groupings: those that relate morphology to phonology (such as allomorphy and word formation), and those that relate it to syntax (e.g., inflection, distinguishing compounds from phrases). Throughout the course we will be mindful of whether there is such a thing as pure morphology, a core set of phenomena having to do with word structure which motivates a distinct component of grammar. Students will do weekly or biweekly problem sets and give a class presentation on a common morphological category or means of formal expression.

ANTH 5528 TOPICS IN RACE THEORY 3.0 BASHKOW
M 1530-1800

This seminar course is intended primarily for graduate students who are planning race-related research. Beginning with the history of anthropological approaches to race, we will consider the contributions of early figures like Franz Boas and W.E.B. DuBois, before turning to more recent work associated with the "rediscovery" of the topic in linguistic anthropology and critical studies of whiteness. The course will invite students to consider anthropology's specific contributions to the discussion of race and race problems, in contradistinction to the larger literatures that exist in adjacent fields like Sociology. To help us grapple with the central question of how symbolic hierarchy interacts with material discrimination, we will explore the possibility of conceptualizing race theoretically as a semiotic phenomenon, one involving not only the objectification of persons but also the racialization of material objects that have both concrete and culturally-mediated properties and effects.

ANTH 5529-1 CHINESE SOCIETIES 3.0 SHEPHERD
TR 0930-1045

The "Culture of Chinese Social Relations," is a seminar reviewing classical works and recent ethnography on Chinese society. This will be a small group seminar for students who have previous background in China studies or anthropology. This course will critically review the numerous characterizations of the Chinese culture of social relations that have been proposed by anthropologists, psychologists, and political scientists. The adequacy of these characterizations will be tested against ethnographic descriptions and literary accounts of Chinese families, gender roles, village life, friendship, formal organizations, and political culture. Examples will be drawn from the People's Republic, Taiwan, and overseas communities. The course will combine lecture and group discussions. Seminar participation and substantial papers required.

ANTH 5529-2 STUDY OF SPIRITUALITY 3.0 TURNER
R 1700-1930

The seminar will explore the cross-cultural commonalities of spirituality and the variations in spiritual practice. To better understand these, we will experimentally try out viewpoints from the cultures concerned. While including the First Americans' religions in the "Great Religions," we will eschew theologies and use ethnographies--accounts of human action--for our material. We will use primary sources (where non-philosophical) from active seers and spiritual leaders, examining the relevant history and context for their spiritual activity, including spiritual contexts as well, such as the presence of spirits. The work of anthropologists who have been involved in crossing such boundaries will be available, those by Steven Friedson, Ter Ellingson, Duncan Earle, Suchitra Samantha, and others. We will invite religious activists in for dialogue and will practice empathy, and we will respectfully enact rituals. Class members will conduct local field research to engage in spirituality in milieus suggested in the class, while recognizing that the phenomenon transcends psychological and sociological limits of discussion.

ANTH 5885 ARCHAEOLOGY OF COLONIAL EXPANSIONS 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
M 1530-1800

This seminar explores the comparative archaeology of colonialism, featuring European expansions against a backdrop of other archaeologically-known examples. Weekly discussions will be organized around analytical angles, time periods, or regions. In addition to the archaeology itself, we will be considering the success of various perspectives in terms of translating and communicating the human experience of being colonized. The core of the class will be critical readings of case studies, contextualized in the changing theoretical landscape of colonialism studies.

ANTH 5589 RITUAL, RELIGION AND CULTURE CHANGE IN PREHISTORY 3.0 PLOG
W 1530-1800

The seminar will examine approaches to understanding ritual and religion in anthropological ethnographies and the extent to which such approaches may be useful in understanding culture change during prehistory. We will thus read both ethnographies and archaeological approaches to ritual and religion, with the specific goal of critiquing the latter and discussing alternative approaches.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 7020 HISTORY THEORY II 3.0 METCALF
W 1400-1515

This course continues the program of ANTH 701, bringing the review of anthropological theory from the mid-twentieth century to the present.

ANTH 7040 ETHNOGRAPHY RESEARCH DESIGN & METHOD 3.0 LORIMER
M 1530-1800

Ethnography can seem a dauntingly mystified task. Yet it is performed mostly through concrete linguistic practice, which can be pinned down & analyzed. Exploiting such analyses, students will rehearse major genres of research design, including problem-construction & IRB negotiation, & consider various techniques for advancing one's research agenda in the field. Students must be, or become, engaged in a local or long-distance ethnographic project.

ANTH 7129 MARRIAGE, MORTALITY, FERTILITY 3.0 SHEPHERD
TR 1400-1515

This course explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of mortality by gender, age, and class, the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations.

ANTH 7400 LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DANZIGER
R 1300-1530

This is an advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically oriented research. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in perception and world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, universals and particulars in language, language in history and prehistory, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation, and the study of poetic language. Through readings and discussion, the implications of each of these topics for the general conduct of anthropology will be addressed. Evaluation is based on take-home essays and problem-sets which are assigned throughout the semester. The course is required for Anthropology graduate students. It fulfills the Theory requirement for graduate students in Linguistics.

ANTH 7590 HIERARCHY, RELATIVISM, AND CULTURAL REASONING 3.0 KHARE
T 1300-1530

A comparative discussion of hierarchy, stratification and individualism, with particular reference to (a) Louis Dumont's work on India and the West; (b) the roles of diverse cultural reasoning and rationality patterns in posing and disposing specific problems/issues in cultural-moral relativism in Western vis-à-vis non-Western societies; and (c) a discussion of (a) and (b) in specific anthropological research projects, including issues in social justice and human rights in natural or man-made disasters.

ANTH 7840 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS IN ANTHRO. 3.0 MOST
R 0930-1200

This course provides an introduction to the use of analytical procedures, database applications, statistics, and quantitative methods in archaeology and anthropology. Analytical techniques used to generate, describe, and analyze archaeological and anthropological data sets are emphasized but experience has shown that students in sociology, psychology, and nursing have little problem applying the statistical methods learned to their own data sets. The course focuses on research design, database construction, hypothesis testing, probability and sampling, and univariate statistics. No prior knowledge of statistics is necessary; background in anthropology, archaeology, or a related field is required.