1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Course Descriptions - Spring 2012

Course Number Index:

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Prin. of Social Analysis Ethnography Archaeology Linguistics
2280, 2291, 2340, 2360, 2365,
2590-001, 2590-02, 3175, 3240,
3260, 3370, 5220, 5360,
5395, 5590-001, 5590-002, 5590-003, 5590-004

2153, 2156, 3559-003

2820, 3559-001, 3559-002, 3589-001, 3880, 3890 2410, 2470, 5401, 5589
Major Requirements
 
Non-Western perspectives for the majors
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern equirement)
1010, 2153, 2156, 3559-003
Senior Seminars
4591-001, 4591-002, 4591-003

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:

Principles of Social Analysis

2280 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
2291 GLOBAL CULTURE AND PUBLIC HEALTH
2340 ANTHROPOLOGY OF BIRTH AND DEATH
2360 CASTANEDA AND DON JUAN
2365 ANTHROPOLOGY AND ART
2590-001 MARKETS AND MORALITIES
2590-002 ANTHROPOLOGY OF BUSINESS
3175 NATIVE AMERICAN ART
3240 ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD
3260 GLOBALIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT
3370 POWER AND THE BODY
5220 ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY
5360 WORLD MENTAL HEALTH
5395 MYTHODOLOGY
5590-001 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY: THEORECTICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS
5590-002 STUDY OF SPIRITUALITY
5590-003 LEGAL ANTHROPOLOGY
5590-004 RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

Ethnography

2153 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS
2156 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF AFRICA
3559-003 GENDER, SEXUALITY AND NATION IN CONTEMPORARY SOUTH KOREA

Archaeology

2820 EMERGENCE OF STATES AND CITIES
3559-001 POLITICS OF THE PAST: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND ARCHAEOLOGY
3559-002 ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH STRATEGIES
3589-001 ARCHAEOLOGY OF DEATH
3880 AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY
3890 ARCHAEOLOGY OF AMERICAN SOUTHWEST
5589-001 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY: ARCHAEOLOGY OF IDENTITY

Linguistics

2410 SOCIOLINGUISTICS
2470 REFLECTIONS OF EXILE
5401 LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS
5589 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY: ARCHAEOLOGY OF IDENTITY

Non-Western perspectives for the Majors

(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern equirement)
1010 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY
2153 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS
2156 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF AFRICA
3559-003

GENDER, SEXUALITY AND NATION IN CONTEMPORARY SOUTH KOREA

Senior Seminars

4591-001 PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
4591-002 GLOBALIZING INEQUALITIES
4591-003 ARCHAEOLOGY AND GLOBALIZATION

Undergraduate Courses:

ANTH 1010-002 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 HARR
MWF 1000-1115 

Anthropology is the cross-cultural study of the human condition. In this introduction to anthropology, we will survey cross-cultural studies of the interrelationships among four key aspects of human societies: kinship, economics, politics, and religion. Through readings, films, lectures, and discussions, we will explore the intricacies of ways of life far removed from the experience of most members of the UVa community. Students will come away from the course with a greater appreciation of the extent of cultural variability and a deeper awareness of the cultural foundations of their own ways of life. Course grades will be based on active participation, short written responses, and three essay-based exams. Satisfies College's Non-Western Perspective Requirement.

ANTH 2153 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS 3.0 HANTMAN
MW 1400-1515

This class is intended to introduce students to the wide variety of cultures and the diversity of historical experiences of Native Americans. After a review of topics in American Indian history, the course will review contemporary issues of concern to Native groups in the U.S. Throughout the course we will consider how Indians and Indian history have been portrayed in popular media by both indigenous and non-indigenous writers, artists, academics, political activists and others. Issues of contemporary political action and sovereignty will also be reviewed.

ANTH 2156 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF AFRICA 3.0 HULTIN
TR 1230-1420

This course draws on critical theory to examine social issues and development in Africa. It explores the general contours of European colonialism, national independence, and the position of African states in today's global economic order. The course exposes students to various theories of underdevelopment and draws on case studies (Sudan, Rwanda, South Africa) to discuss issues related to race, class, labor, gender, trade & HIV/AIDS.

ANTH 2280 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DOUGLASS
MWF 1000-1050

Medical Anthropology is a growing and important new subfield within general anthropology. Medical Anthropology compares different cultures' ideas about illness and curing. Although disease is a concept referring to a pathological condition of the body in which functioning is disturbed, illness is a cultural concept: a condition marked by deviation from what is considered a normal, healthy state. Treatment of illness in Western industrial societies focuses on curing specific diseased organs or controlling a specific virus. In many so-called "traditional" societies greater emphasis is placed on the social and psychological dimensions of illness. In this course we will learn that different cultures, even in the United States have different ways to talk about illness, and that the American medical community is at times as "culture bound" as anywhere. "Science" does not stand outside culture.

ANTH 2291 GLOBAL CULTURE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 3.0 COLVIN
MW 1530-1645

Description to be Posted.

ANTH 2340 ANTHROPOLOGY OF BIRTH AND DEATH 3.0 KHARE
T 1400-1630

Relevant anthropological approaches, studies and perspectives are discussed for understanding crucial human life-cycle events and related issues in today's social life. Comparative social-religious-ritual, bio-cultural, and medical anthropological approaches will be pursued to explicate (a) human reproduction issues, birthing and child-rearing practices; (b) race, caste, gender and aging inequalities; (c) food, nutrition and self-image issues; and (d) qualities of life, dying, death and afterlife issues.

ANTH 2360 CASTANEDA AND DON JUAN 3.0 WAGNER
TR 0930-1045

The six books of Carlos Castaneda represent what is perhaps an anthropological ideal--a world in which the native's concepts of power, sorcery, and transformation are "real" rather than the social systems, adaptations, and symbolic processes generally used to explain them. They are not ethnography; in his latest preface Castaneda prefers to treat them as "autobiography." Yet they can be used very effectively to illustrate a wide range of concepts in anthropology and traditional religions, which is what this course is all about. It will not teach you to fly--it may teach you to write--but it will hopefully help you to understand how anthropologists think. The course will be given in an open seminar format, with discussion encouraged. Grades will be based on 3 papers.

ANTH 2365 ANTHROPOLOGY AND ART 3.0 DOUGLASS
MW 1530-1645

The course will emphasize art in small-scale (contemporary) societies (sometimes called ethnic art or "primitive art"). It will include a survey of aesthetic productions of major areas throughout the world (Australia, Africa, Oceania, Native America, Meso-America). We will also read about and discuss such issues as art (and architecture) and cultural identity, tourist arts, anonymity, authenticity, the question of universal aesthetic cannons, exhibiting cultures, the difference between the bellas artes and arte popular, and the impact of globalization on these arts.

ANTH 2410 SOCIOLINGUISTICS 3.0 WILLIAMS
MW 1100-1150

Every "single" living language is in practice an unbounded array of linguistic forms, functions, and feelings distributed unequally among speakers. Sociolinguists take such variety and inequality as starting points for investigating language as a crucially social (rather than essentially mental) phenomenon. In this introductory course, we will survey how languages vary through time, across space, and among social groups while also thinking about how times, spaces, and social groups are themselves shaped by linguistic variation. No background in linguistics or anthropology is required.

ANTH 2470 REFLECTIONS OF EXILE 3.0 LEFKOWITZ
TR 1230-1320

Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required.

ANTH 2590-001 TOPICS: MARKETS AND MORALITIES 3.0 ARMENGOL
TR 1100-1215

This course will examine markets in a broad sense, from local farmers markets to the trading in complex financial instruments that recently led to a global economic crisis. We will challenge the assumption that market phenomena are driven by human nature and economic principles that transcend moral issues. Ethnographic works analyzing diverse forms of gift and commodity exchange across the world will guide our analyses. They will bring moral questions into focus and situate markets- and "the market" - within particular histories, ideologies, discourses and spaces. Our readings will include classical texts as well as contemporary rereadings of such work; news coverage and analysis of the 2008 market crash and the response of governments; and work in anthropology on the intersection of money, politics and corporate interests.

ANTH 2590-002 ANTHROPOLOGY OF BUSINESS 3.0 LOPEZ
TR 1400-1515

This course is an ethnographic exploration of the business world and the role it plays in Western culture. We will look at some of the most interesting cases of applied anthropology in corporations, and how ethnographic research can help us to better understand the social aspects of marketing, industrial design, finances, and customer service, among others.

ANTH 2820 EMERGENCE OF STATES AND CITIES 3.0 WATTENMAKER
MW 1400-1450

This course explores the archaeology of early states and cities in both the Old (Mesopotamia and Egypt) and New (Teotihuacan, the Aztecs and the Maya) Worlds. We will discuss the ways that archaeologists learn about complex societies through fieldwork, laboratory research (including artifact analyses), texts, and ethnographic studies. Topics discussed include 1) the problematic concept of "civilization", 2) the origins of agriculture and its effects on society, 3) the shift from egalitarian societies to those with social ranking, 4) theories and evidence for the rise of state societies, 5) urbanism, 6) social, religious, political and economic life in early cities, 7) the beginnings of writing and 8) the collapse of complex societies. By highlighting the wide range of variability in pre-industrial societies, the course emphasizes the role of cultural values in shaping the organization of early societies. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement. It has been used in the past to satisfy requirements for Midde Eastern Studies and Latin American Studies (please check with the Program Director for approval).

ANTH 3010 HISTORY AND THEORY 3.0 ALEXY
TR 1100-1215

This course is designed for students majoring in anthropology: it presents a broad historical outline of major approaches and debates in the field, and fosters skills in critically reading and discussing social and cultural theory. By reading sample works we will learn about the approaches of 19th-century social evolutionism, Boasian cultural anthropology, l'Année Sociologique, British structural functionalism, French structuralism, symbolic anthropology, American cultural materialism and neo-evolutionism, later American cultural anthropology, practice theory, feminism, and post-modern theories. We will be concerned to understand these approaches not only as theoretical frameworks for understanding other cultures, but also as commentaries upon, and reflections of, the culture that produced them. The course stresses close reading and analysis of primary texts. The discussion session is obligatory. This is a required course for anthropology majors.

ANTH 3175 NATIVE AMERICAN ART 3.0 HANTMAN
TR 1530-1645

This seminar will offer a critical review of the role of museums, exhibits and material objects in the representation of Native American culture. The course focuses on a particular collection of objects - the Astor Collection of Native American art - once exhibited in the Astor Hotel in Times Square, New York City in the early twentieth century and now curated by the University of Virginia Art Museum. We will examine the cultural practice of collecting in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the logic and purpose of displaying Native American crafts at that time. We will also examine the material culture itself seeking an understanding of the cultural context of its production from indigenous meanings to the effect of tourist market demands. The objects in the collection were produced by Native people throughout North America. Students in the seminar will develop a seminar paper (20 pages) examining one type of material culture in the collection or one aspect of the Astor Hotel exhibit historical context. This seminar is part of an ongoing project by students, museum staff and faculty at UVa to study the Astor Collection with the goal of developing a new exhibit which will re-examine the original display in the Astor Hotel.

ANTH 3240 ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD 3.0 WELLMAN
TR 1400-1515

How is food nourishing? In this class, we will consider food beyond its role as a life-giving biological substance by addressing the social and cultural significance of food. In particular, we will examine how food practices shape gender, spirituality, the body, and ethnic or national affiliation. A central topic covered in class will be the relationship between the beliefs and behaviors surrounding the production, distribution, and consumption of food - or "food ways"- and personal or group identity and hierarchy. This course provides a general introduction to the anthropology of food and will incorporate a small ethnographic research project on local food ways.

ANTH 3260 GLOBALIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT 3.0 HULTIN
MW 1500-1550

Explores how globalization and development affect the lives of people in different parts of the world. Topics include poverty, inequality, and the role of governments and international agencies.

ANTH 3370 POWER AND THE BODY 3.0 MENTORE
MW 1100-1150

The human individual, as subject of the coercive strategies of society, has been the central topic of western intellectual thought for some time now. Human corporeality in action, as agent, and as the surface upon which power operates has consistently fascinated us. The body, in fact, seems to have served as a constitutive element of power and as its field of knowledge. In this course, we will cover such topics as the tortured body, the gendered body, the racial body, and the imprisoned body. We will attempt to understand how these meanings of somatic presence become knowable. In so doing, the form and character of a radically different theory of power will be introduced.

ANTH 3559-001 POLITICS OF THE PAST: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 WATTENMAKER
TR 1530-1645

In most societies, beliefs about history form an integral component of collective identity. This makes archaeology, which seeks to construct and understand the history of cultures and regions, deeply meaningful to modern populations living in areas where research is underway. Moreover, archaeological results are sometimes viewed as having bearing on modern political conflicts over issues such as land claims. This seminar course examines the dynamic relationship between the past and present from a number of different angles. For example, we explore why and how views about the past help shape aspects of identity, and how different interest groups manipulate understanding of the past to further their political agendas. We will also consider how the understanding archaeologists have of their own culture in relation to others shapes the ways that the past is portrayed in films, museum exhibits and scholarly literature. Specific issues and case studies from various parts of the world serve to highlight some of the ways that the past and present intersect, the impact modern politics has on the ways archaeologists work, and the kinds of political issues archaeologists confront in their research.

ANTH 3559-002 ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH STRATEGIES 3.0 PLOG
MW 1400-1515

An examination of archaeological research design, with an emphasis on the relation between research questions, theoretical propositions, and field and lab methods. Approaches to both excavation and survey will be reviewed, followed by discussion of various types of artifact (e.g., chemical characterization, attribute coding, typologies) and data (e.g., spatial distributions, associations and correlations) analysis.

ANTH 3559-003 GENDER, SEXUALITY AND NATION IN CONTEMPORARY SOUTH KOREA 3.0 FREEMAN
TR 09:30-10:45

This course looks at the way South Korean men and women have refashioned their everyday lives amidst the radical and turbulent changes of the past century. Since liberation from colonial rule, South Koreans have lived through rapid urbanization, industrialization, military authoritarian rule, democratic reform, rising consumerism, and integration into the global capitalist economy. We will explore what it means to have lived through these changes and what the consequences are for the diverse ways Koreans think about their gender, sexual and ethnic/national identities. Keeping in mind the tensions and interrelationship between ideological constructs and lived experiences of gender, family, sexuality and nation, we will consider a wide range of social contexts and structures which frame the lives of South Koreans past and present, including the historical legacies of colonialism, national division, military rule, American neo-imperialism, transformations in mothering, care, sexuality, marriage, consumerism, neoliberalism, and global capitalism. We will also look at South Korea’s relationship with its diasporic communities as a site for the construction of new meanings and practices of gender, sexuality and nation.

ANTH 3589 TOPICS: ARCHAEOLOGY OF DEATH 3.0 HEITMAN
TR 0930-1045

From the pyramids of Egypt to Ötzi the Iceman, archaeologists have long focused on the treatment of the dead to learn about the beliefs of a culture and the structure of a society. This course will examine various aspects of mortuary analysis in archaeology, including funerary ritual, architecture and burial customs. We will also explore the ethical and political debates involved with mortuary research and the control of human remains and objects.

ANTH 3880 AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
MWF 1100-1150

In this class we survey archaeological knowledge that spans the enormous chronological range of human life on the African continent, from the underpinnings of the Early Stone Age over 2 million years ago, up through European and Arab colonization, the Atlantic diaspora, and post-apartheid South Africa. The class will feature socioeconomic, technological, and cultural transformations in the African past that we know through archaeology, as they inform us about everything from daily life to belief systems to the emergence of states. We will feature important archaeological sites and discoveries that changed our understanding of the African past. The politics and ethics of doing archaeology in Africa, and a multidisciplinary approach to the African past, are topics discussed throughout the course.

ANTH 3890 ARCHAEOLOGY OF AMERICAN SOUTHWEST 3.0 PLOG
TR 1100-1150

An examination of the prehistory of the American Southwest (New Mexico, Arizona, and southern Utah and Colorado) with an emphasis on the origin and development of Pueblo culture in the Four Corners region. Topics will include the origin of agriculture, the establishment of village-based organization, demographic change including the major population declines of the 12th and 13th centuries, conflict/warfare, and ritual change. Particular areas of concern will be the Chaco Canyon region of northwestern New Mexico, Mesa Verde, and the Salt-Gila River Valleys.

ANTH 4591-001 PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 MENTORE
MW 1530-1645

The purpose of this course will be to bring to the awareness of students the not often considered view that the theories used by anthropologists come directly from deeply embedded western philosophical knowledge. This course will not only introduce some of these knowledge forms to students, but so demonstrate how they are applied in the anthropological project and, indeed, how they frequently end-up hindering the project of understanding cultural others.

ANTH 4591-002 GLOBALIZING INEQUALITIES 3.0 KHARE
R 1400-1630

The course discusses diverse social inequalities under uneven resources, processes and consequences of globalization. A comparative cultural, economic and political focus will be developed, including (but not exclusively on) on globalizing India, America and selected European countries for discussing (a) race-caste-class-ethnicity issues; (b) the middle class and working class crises; (c) food, hunger, health and health care inequalities; and (d) ideologies of and value conflicts in globalization.

ANTH 4591-003 ARCHAEOLOGY AND GLOBALIZATION 3.0 PAWLOWICZ
MW 1400-1515

This course explores the history of archaeological approaches to interaction from the beginnings of the discipline to the present. In so doing, it explores the extent to which lessons from modern global contexts can be applied to large-scale, "global" systems in the ancient world. At the same time, it explores the impact of globalization on archaeological practice, and the role of archaeology in the modern, globalized world.

 


Undergraduate & Graduate Courses:

ANTH 5220 ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 DAMON
M 1700-1930

Organized in three parts, this course introduces students to anthropologically useful ideas in marxism and world system theory, the use of 'exchange theory' over the last 100 years, and research in newer versions of ecological anthropology as it bears on the social nature of production. An important theme running through each section will be relationships between production, circulation and display. Students will write 5-10 page papers on each of the three parts, increasingly bending their papers to their longer-term research interests. Individualized oral reports on tangential readings are also expected, and will enable students to structure aspects of the course to their topical or regional interests. Although designed for graduate students, undergraduates are encouraged to consider the course to round out their undergraduate careers and help define their futures.

ANTH 5360 WORLD MENTAL HEALTH 3.0 MERKEL
W 1630-2100

This course will examine mental health issues from the perspectives of biomedicine and anthropology, emphasizing local traditions of illness and healing as well as evidence from epidemiology and neurobiology. Included topics will be psychosis, depression, PTSD, Culture Bound Syndromes, and suicide. We will also examine the role of pharmaceutical companies in the spread of western based mental health care and culturally sensitive treatment.

ANTH 5395 MYTHODOLOGY 3.0 WAGNER
TR 1230-1345

This course offers experience in using and understanding a very simple format for the analysis of a myth or story (any myth or story), called obviation. Following an introductory explanation, students will each select one or more myths or stories, and present and explain its obviation in class. Grading will be based on the student's expertise in doing so. The course grade is based on a final paper plus class participation.

ANTH 5401 LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS 3.0 CONTINI-MORAVA
T 1700-1930

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include one paper on phonology, one on morphology, and one on syntax (the nature of the assignment may vary depending on the particular language being studied).

ANTH 5589 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY: ARCHAEOLOGY OF IDENTITY 3.0 LAVIOLETTE
R 1700-1930

This seminar explores the ways in which individual and collective identities are studied in archaeology. We will use multiple case studies to examine archaeological (material) approaches to the study of ethnicity, gender, kinship, class, and race. Anthropological understandings of the multiple, fluid, and contingent definitions of identity offer both a challenge and an opportunity for archaeologists to interrogate essentialist notions of this concept for individuals and the collective over time and space.

ANTH 5590-001 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY: THEORETICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS 3.0 FRASER
R 1530-1800

This course will provide an overview of theoretical frameworks and methods in medical anthropology situated so that students understand the key assumptions, kinds of questions asked and data used within each framework, something of their histories and exemplars from research studies. Students will become informed and critical readers and will initiate a small research project of their own.

ANTH 5590-002 STUDY OF SPIRITUALITY 3.0 TURNER
R 1900-2130

The seminar will explore the cross-cultural commonalities of spirituality and the variations in spiritual practice. To better understand these, we will experimentally try out viewpoints from the cultures concerned. While including the First Americans' religions in the "Great Religions," we will eschew theologies and use ethnographies--accounts of human action--for our material. We will use primary sources (where non-philosophical) from active seers and spiritual leaders, examining the relevant history and context for their spiritual activity, including spiritual contexts as well, such as the presence of spirits. The work of anthropologists who have been involved in crossing such boundaries will be available, those by Steven Friedson, Ter Ellingson, Duncan Earle, Suchitra Samantha, and others. We will invite religious activists in for dialogue and will practice empathy, and we will respectfully enact rituals. Class members will conduct local field research to engage in spirituality in milieus suggested in the class, while recognizing that the phenomenon transcends psychological and sociological limits of discussion.

ANTH 5590-003 LEGAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 ALEXY
W 1700-1930

This course investigates key anthropological questions through the lens of law systems, legal argumentation, and people's interactions with these thoughts and forms. Rather than taking as given the hegemonic power that legal structures might hold over people's lives and thought, this course questions how people use, abuse, subvert, and leverage the legal structures in which they find themselves.

ANTH 5590-004 RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS 3.0 LORIMER
R 1530-1800

Ethnography can seem a dauntingly mystified task. Yet it is performed mostly through concrete linguistic practice, which can be pinned down & analyzed. Exploiting such analyses, students will rehearse major genres of research design, including problem-construction & IRB negotiation, & consider various techniques for advancing one's research agenda in the field. Students must be, or become, engaged in a local or long-distance ethnographic project.

 


Graduate Courses:

ANTH 7020 THE HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY THEORY II 3.0 METCALF
MW 1400-1515

This course continues the program of ANTH 7010, bringing the review of anthropological theory from the mid-twentieth century to the present.

ANTH 7060 GRANT WRITING 3.0 METCALF
W 1830-2130

A workshop for graduates preparing dissertation proposals and writing grant applications. Each student prepares several drafts of a proposal, revising it at each stage in response to the criticisms of classmates and the instructor.

ANTH 7400 LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0 LEFKOWITZ
R 1400-1730

An advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically-oriented research. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, language and nationalism, universals and particulars in language, language in history and prehistory, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation, and the study of poetic language.

This course is required for all Anthropology graduate students. It also counts toward the Theory requirement for the M.A. in Linguistics.

ANTH 7541 TOPICS IN SOCIOLINGUISTICS 3.0 DANZIGER
R 1400-1630

The ideal that speech should reflect the speaker's inner world is a culturally particular one. It can be opposed to an ideal of 'authenticity' in which speakers strive to re-instantiate exact forms of speech and action without regard to individual inner states. We review the literature relevant to this opposition, considering the different emphases placed on mental content and on ritual form in various cultural ideologies and practices.