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Link List to Granting Institutions

Grants and Fellowships for Doctoral Students in Anthropology

This list is culled from a few places and it certainly isn’t complete. Please email me if you find a grant or fellowship that should be added to the list. In the list, some fellowships are repeated in different sections if they apply to more than one category, e.g. could give money for both pre-field and fieldwork. My sources include the University of Virginia’s general list of fellowship opportunities for graduate students, the University of Chicago Anthropology department’s list, and the AAA’s page of fellowships. UVA students should also check the websites of the appropriate regional program or department, for instance the East Asia Center, Department of Middle Eastern Studies and South Asian Languages and Cultures, Carter Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, Department of French, or Latin American Studies.

UVA Internal Programs

UVA’s Office of Research Administration

Tomorrow’s Professor Today
Tomorrow's Professor Today (TPT) is a professional development program for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Designed to facilitate the transition from student to academic professional, the program focuses on improving preparedness in three key areas—teaching, professional development, and adjustment to a university career. Activities to support this endeavor include participating in a pedagogy seminar, attending workshops, observing and interviewing faculty/administrators, preparing teaching documents, attending conferences, presenting research, and peer-mentoring fellow participants.

Clay Fellowships
Grants for summer support to graduate students at the dissertation stage whose research contributes to the global humanities, whether on-grounds, nationally, or abroad. Students applying must have completed all exams. Awards up to $3,500.

Research Support for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences
In collaboration with the College of Arts & Sciences, the VPR also provides funding for the biannual research support grants in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences through a competitive grant program. Funding may be requested for up to $3,000 for any activity or expense associated with a scholarly or research project.

Raven Fellowship
The Raven Society endeavors to bring together outstanding students, faculty, administrators, and alumni of the various schools of the University that they may derive the benefits of mutual acquaintance in pursuit of diligent scholarship and intellectual activity beyond the limits of systematic work in the classroom. As such, the Raven Fellowships will be targeted towards innovative research projects that cross disciplines in novel ways. While all applications will be reviewed, special consideration will be given to those projects with a distinctly interdisciplinary focus. The Raven Society will award research fellowships in support of 2013 summer or fall independent research projects. Research may be related to a dissertation or thesis, however, it is strongly encouraged that the projects go above and beyond what is for academic credit. Each fellowship will award up to $2500.

Pre-fieldwork Programs
 

American Indian Graduate Center
The AIGC Fellowship program provides approximately $1,200,000 in fellowships to over 400 American Indian and Alaska Native graduate and professional students each year.  Graduate fellowships are monetary awards made to American Indian and Alaska Native graduate or professional degree-seeking students, who meet all eligibility criteria.  The fellowship amount is typically between $1000 and $5000 per academic year (not including summer), and varies from year to year, depending on the number of qualified applicants, the availability of funds and unmet financial need.

American Philosophical Society Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research
The Lewis and Clark Fund (initially supported by the Stanford Ascherman/Baruch Blumberg Fund for Basic Science, established by a benefaction from the late Stanford Ascherman, MD, of San Francisco) encourages exploratory field studies for the collection of specimens and data and to provide the imaginative stimulus that accompanies direct observation. Applications are invited from disciplines with a large dependence on field studies, such as archeology, anthropology, biology, ecology, geography, geology, linguistics, paleontology, and population genetics, but grants will not be restricted to these fields.
Grants will be available to doctoral students. Postdoctoral fellows, master’s degree candidates, and undergraduates are not eligible.

American Philosophical Society Phillips Fund Grant for Native American Research
Grants of up to $3500 to support research in Native American linguistics, ethnohistory and the history of studies of Native Americas, in the continental US and Canada. (Grants are NOT made for projects in archaeology, ethnography, or psycholinguistics). Applications are accepted from graduate students for research on masters theses or doctoral dissertations.

American Institute for Yemeni Studies Arabic Language Training Grants
Arabic language training grants for a 10-week program at the Yemen Language Center, The Center for Arabic Language and Eastern Studies or the Sana’a Institute for Arabic Language - - only for students who intend to conduct research in Yemen.

Blakemore Foundation: Blakemore Freeman Fellowships for Advanced Study of Asian Languages
The Blakemore Foundation makes approximately 12 grants each year for the advanced study of modern Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Southeast Asian languages (Thai, Vietnamese, Indonesian, Khmer, Burmese). Blakemore grants are intended for individuals successfully pursuing careers involving Asia who find that language study abroad at an advanced level is essential to realize their goals. The grants fund a year of language study at an institution in Asia selected by the applicant and approved by the Foundation. Where there is no structured language program at an educational institution in the country, the grant may provide for the financing of private tutorials under terms set forth in the Grant Guidelines. The grants cover tuition and related educational expenses, basic living costs and transportation, but do not include dependent expenses. Applicants must be at or near an advanced level in the language of study, must be able to pursue full-time language study during the term of the grant and must be US citizens or permanent residents. Among the various selection criteria, greater weight will be given to applications where the regular use of the language is a key part of the career program and where the applicant has had prior experience in the country in question. Application forms are on the Web

CASA (Center for Arabic Study Abroad)
Summer and Full Year Programs. A limited number of fellowships for advanced Arabic language study at the American University in Cairo of the University of Damascus for graduate and upper-division undergraduate students committed to a career in Middle East Studies. Fellowships applicants must be US citizens or Permanent Residents, have had at least 3 years of Arabic language study, and pass a written examination. Two programs are available: 1) a two-month summer Institute concentrating on Colloquial Egyptian Arabic and 2) a full-year program including Colloquial but emphasizing literary Arabic. (The full-year program is primarily open to graduate students. Applications are available on the CASA website, at our Middle East Center, and by contacting the following address

Council for European Studies (CES) Pre-Dissertation Fellowships
Pre-dissertation fellowships of $4000 to fund a first major research project in Europe (including Turkey & Russia). Applicants are expected to have finished at least a majority of their doctoral coursework, but this is a fellowship for preliminary research and thus passage of the qualifying exam and admission to candidacy are not a prerequisite. (Those who have already engaged in extensive field work and study in Europe related to their dissertation are not eligible.) International students are eligible to apply. Fellowships have three components: a) A two-month stay abroad, during which time fellows pursue original archival and field research; b) Fellows’ participation at the CES international Conference, where they present their findings and receive feedback from senior scholars; c) Publication of fellows’ research reports in the CES journal, the European Studies Forum.

Critical Language Scholarship Program
Scholarships (tuition, room, board, travel) for intensive overseas study of critical-need languages such as Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bangla, Chinese, Hindi, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Punjabi, Russian, Turkish and Urdu – sponsored by the US Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the Council of American Overseas Research Centers. Recipients of these scholarships will be expected to continue their language study beyond the scholarship period and later apply their critical language skills in their professional careers. Open to graduate and undergraduate students, must be US citizen.

Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship (DPDF) Program
The Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship (DPDF) program supports mid-stage graduate students in formulating effective doctoral dissertation research proposals that contribute to the development of interdisciplinary fields of study in the humanities and social sciences. Intended to help emerging scholars make the transition from learners to producers of knowledge within innovative areas of inquiry, the fellowship creates a space for multidisciplinary faculty mentorship and opens unique opportunities for both interdisciplinary and international network building.
The fellowship cycle includes spring and fall workshops designed and led by pairs of senior tenured faculty, which provide a framework for pre-dissertation research and guide proposal writing within the context of selected research fields. In the summer months, student fellows carry out exploratory field research on their topics to evaluate issues of feasibility and methods of investigation. Now in its seventh year, the program annually offers training in five fields to sixty graduate students.

FLAS Fellowships
Fellowships for support of modern foreign language and area studies (Latin America, South Asia, Middle East, Russia/East Europe) cover all tuition and fees and provide a $15,000 stipend. Summer fellowships for intensive language study include up to $4000 tuition and $2500 stipend. In-residence grad students fill out application from the Dean of Students Office. Open to incoming as well as in-residence graduate students, US citizens or permanent residents.

Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships Predoctoral Awards
Predoctoral Fellowships for doctoral students regardless of race, national origin, religion, gender, age, disability or sexual orientation (must have become a US citizen by November of the year of application), with preference for members of minority groups whose under representation in the American professorate has been severe and longstanding (Alaskan Natives [Eskimo or Aleut], Black/African- Americans, Mexican Americans, Chicanas/Chicanos, Native American Indians, Native Pacific Islanders [Polynesian/Micronesian], Puerto Rican). Any eligible student may apply who can provide evidence that they can fully utilize 3 years of support including a year of course work (i.e., 1st or 2nd year in the Chicago program). Award includes stipend of $20,000 and tuition allowance and provides up to 3 years of support. Applicants must be committed to a career in teaching and research at the college or university level and be well prepared to use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.

Jacob K. Javits Graduate Fellowships
Approx. 45 need-based awards for up to 4 years of study in the social sciences, humanities, and fine arts. Covers tuition and stipend of up to $30,000. US citizens or permanent residents; open to college seniors and graduate students who have not yet completed their first year of graduate study.

Jacobs Research Fund, Whatcom Museum Society
Grants of up to $3000 supporting anthropological research (socio-cultural or linguistic in content) on the indigenous peoples of Canada, Mexico, and the United States, including Alaska, with a preference for the Pacific Northwest. Grants are given for work on problems in: language, social organization, political organization, religion, mythology, other arts, psychology, and folk science. No citizenship restrictions, open to students at all levels of a degree program so long as the project is relevant.

National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program
A three-year award; covers tuition and a stipend of $30,000. Essentially college seniors and first- and second-year graduate students are eligible to apply. All applications must be submitted via NSF’s “fastlane” on the Web. US citizens and permanent residents.

National Security Education Program (NSEP) David L. Boren Graduate Fellowships
Fellowships for the study of languages, cultures, and world regions which are critical to U.S. national security other than Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. NSEP embodies a recognition that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but the new challenges of global society, including sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness. NSEP Fellowships enable graduate students to pursue specialization in area and language study or to add an important international dimension to their education. Applicants design their own programs and may combine domestic language and cultural study with overseas study. All fellowships must include study of a modern language other than English and the study of an area and culture. NSEP Fellowship awards are made for a minimum of one and a maximum of six academic semesters (24 months). The maximum level of support for a combined overseas and domestic program is $30,000. A maximum of $12,000 per semester for up to two semesters ($24,000) is available for overseas study. A maximum of $12,000 is available for a program of domestic only study. Support for domestic study is limited to language or area studies that enhance a degree program Applicants must be US citizens, and there is a “service requirement” which stipulates that an award recipient work in the Departments of Defense, Homeland Security, State, or the Intelligence Community. If, after making a full and good faith effort (according to conditions and rules established by NSEP), an award recipient demonstrates to NSEP that no appropriate position is available in one of these agencies, he/she must seek a position with national security responsibilities in any federal department or agency. Approval of service outside of a priority agency is contingent upon satisfactory demonstration of a full and good faith effort in accordance with conditions established by NSEP. (Beginning in 2008 this requirement was modified to allow recipients to fulfill the service agreement in a “position in the field of education in a discipline related to the study supported by the program.”

Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans
These fellowships (30 per year) provide an annual stipend of $25,000 +half the cost of tuition for two years of graduate study in any scholarly discipline or professional field. Eligible "New Americans" are (1) US Permanent Residents who have had more than one year of IRS filings; (2) naturalized US citizens or (3) children of two parents who are both naturalized citizens. Applicants may be no older than 30 years of age as of November 1, 2010 and may be no further advanced than the 2nd year of study in the same graduate program; some preference is given to candidates who have not yet begun their graduate studies but are in the process of applying. Candidates must demonstrate the relevance of graduate education to their long-term career goals and potential in enhancing their contributions to society. Fellowships are not solely awarded on the basis of academic record. A successful candidate will give evidence of at least two of the follow three attributes or criteria for selection: (1) creativity, originality, and initiative demonstrated in any area of her/his live; (2) a commitment to and capacity of accomplishment, demonstrated through activity that has required drive and sustained effort; and (3) a commitment to the values expressed in the US Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The third criterion includes activity in support of human rights and the rule of law, in opposition to unwarranted encroachment on personal liberty, and in advancing the responsibilities of citizenship in a free society.

The Point Foundation. National LGBT Scholarship Fund
Application process is open to all LGBT students nationwide regardless of level of education.

Smithsonian Institution Graduate Student Fellowships
Independent research done in-residence at the Smithsonian in association with the research staff and using the Institution’s resources. (See brochure for possible areas of research.) Available to full-time graduate students who have not yet been admitted to candidacy. 10-week Graduate Student Fellowships of $6000.

Fieldwork Fellowships and Grants
* the fellowships most common for Socio-Cultural Anthropology students are marked with a star
 

* Fulbright IIE
This is UVA’s information page about IIE. The study/research grant category includes projects in both academic and arts fields. The study/research grants are available in approximately 140 countries. Applicants for these grants design their own projects and will typically work with advisers at foreign universities or other institutes of higher education.

* Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowships
This program provides grants to colleges and universities to fund individual doctoral students who conduct research in other countries, in modern foreign languages and area studies for periods of six to 12 months. Projects deepen research knowledge on and help the nation develop capability in areas of the world not generally included in U.S. curricula. Projects focusing on Western Europe are not supported.

* Social Science Research Council (SSRC) - International Dissertation Field Research Fellowships [IDRF]
The program is open to graduate students in the humanities and social sciences -- regardless of citizenship -- enrolled in PhD programs in the United States. Applicants to the 2013 IDRF competition must complete all PhD requirements except on-site research by the time the fellowship begins or by December 2013, whichever comes first. The program invites proposals for dissertation research conducted, in whole or in part, outside the United States, about non-US topics. It will consider applications for dissertation research grounded in a single site, informed by broader cross-regional and interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as applications for multi-sited, comparative, and transregional research.  Proposals that identify the United States as a case for comparative inquiry are welcome; however, proposals which focus predominantly or exclusively on the United States are not eligible.  

* Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research
Dissertation Fieldwork Grants are awarded to aid doctoral or thesis research. The program contributes to the Foundation's overall mission to support basic research in anthropology and to ensure that the discipline continues to be a source of vibrant and significant work that furthers our understanding of humanity's cultural and biological origins, development, and variation. The Foundation supports research that demonstrates a clear link to anthropological theory and debates, and promises to make a solid contribution to advancing these ideas. There is no preference for any methodology, research location, or subfield. The Foundation particularly welcomes proposals that employ a comparative perspective, can generate innovative approaches or ideas, and/or integrate two or more subfields.

* National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grants
The National Science Foundation's Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences (BCS), Division of Social and Economic Sciences (SES), National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES), and the SBE Office of Multidisciplinary Activities (SMA) award grants to doctoral students to improve the quality of dissertation research. These grants provide funds for items not normally available through the student's university. Additionally, these grants allow doctoral students to undertake significant data-gathering projects and to conduct field research in settings away from their campus that would not otherwise be possible. Proposals are judged on the basis of their scientific merit, including the theoretical importance of the research question and the appropriateness of the proposed data and methodology to be used in addressing the question. Here is the Cultural Anthropology fellowship page, and here is the Law and Social Science fellowship page.

American Center for Mongolian Studies (ACMS) Research Fellowships
The ACMS Research Fellowship Program will annually support up to three fellows to conduct up to 12-months of doctoral dissertation or post-doctoral research in Mongolia on topics in the Social Sciences or Humanities. Natural Science research is not eligible, unless there are clear areas in which the research furthers social, cultural, political, or policy knowledge relevant to Mongolia or the region. All applicants must be citizens of the US or Canada, and must be attending or recently graduated from a university in the US or Canada. The program seeks to promote research opportunities in Mongolia among scholars who have not included the country in their previous research, and to broaden the knowledge base of scholars already working in the country. Previous Mongolian Studies experience is not required, but projects should enhance knowledge of Mongolia and the Mongols within relevant academic disciplines or fields of study. Projects that link research conducted in Mongolia to research in other parts of Asia or across academic fields are especially encouraged.

American Center of Oriental Research, Amman, Jordan
The American Center of Oriental Research ( ACOR ) in Amman , Jordan , is a private, non-profit academic institution dedicated to promoting research and publication in the fields of archaeology, anthropology, history, languages, biblical studies, Arabic, Islamic studies and other aspects of Middle Eastern studies.

American Councils for International Education ACTR-ACCELS Programs
With funds from the U.S. Department of State (Title VIII) and U.S. Department of Education (Fulbright Hays), American Councils administers several major grants for independent, overseas research in the humanities and social sciences as well as language training. In recent years, American Councils scholars have conducted independent research in Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine.

AIYS (American Institute for Yemeni Studies)
The American Institute for Yemeni Studies is a consortium of institutions of higher education whose purpose is to promote scholarly research on Yemen.  The Institute provides essential resources for the support of research in Yemen and the  development of academic ties between the Yemeni and American academic communities.

American Institute for Maghrib Studies
The American Institute for Maghrib Studies (AIMS) announces its annual Grants Program for the academic year beginning in May 2013. The program offers grants to US scholars interested in conducting research on North Africa in any Maghrib country, specifically Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, or Tunisia. AIMS sponsors three Overseas Research Centers in the region in Oran, Tunis and Tangier and has other institutional affiliations that support AIMS scholars. AIMS only funds primary research conducted in the Maghrib.

American Institute of Indian Studies
Junior Research Fellowships are available to doctoral candidates at U.S. universities in all fields of study. These grants are specifically designed to enable doctoral candidates to pursue their dissertation research in India. Junior Research Fellows establish formal affiliation with Indian universities and Indian research supervisors. Awards are available for up to 11 months.

American Research Center in Egypt

In addition to providing administrative support and a reliable base for a wide array of expeditions and scholarly research taking place in Egypt, ARCE also provides funding, in the form of grants, for a significant number of research and conservation projects each year.

American Research Institute in Turkey
The American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT) is a non-profit educational institution dedicated to promoting North American and Turkish research and exchanges related to Turkey in all fields of the humanities and social sciences. ARIT provides support for these aims by maintaining research centers in Istanbul and Ankara, and by administering programs of fellowships to support research in Turkey at doctoral and advanced research levels.  

American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise – Schusterman Israel Scholar Awards
The Israel Scholar Development Fund of the American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise is pleased to offer awards to encourage students to pursue academic careers in fields related to the study of Israel. Awards will be available to undergraduates and college graduates who have already been accepted to a graduate program, graduate students who have received master’s degrees in Middle East related fields who wish to pursue a doctorate and doctoral students who are writing dissertations related to Israel.

American Philosophical Society Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research
The Lewis and Clark Fund (initially supported by the Stanford Ascherman/Baruch Blumberg Fund for Basic Science, established by a benefaction from the late Stanford Ascherman, MD, of San Francisco) encourages exploratory field studies for the collection of specimens and data and to provide the imaginative stimulus that accompanies direct observation. Applications are invited from disciplines with a large dependence on field studies, such as archeology, anthropology, biology, ecology, geography, geology, linguistics, paleontology, and population genetics, but grants will not be restricted to these fields.

American Philosophical Society Phillips Fund Grant for Native American Research
Grants of up to $3500 to support research in Native American linguistics, ethnohistory and the history of studies of Native Americas, in the continental US and Canada. (Grants are NOT made for projects in archaeology, ethnography, or psycholinguistics). Applications are accepted from graduate students for research on masters theses or doctoral dissertations.

American Philosophical Society – John Hope Franklin Dissertation Fellowships
The John Hope Franklin Dissertation Fellowship, named in honor of a distinguished member of the American Philosophical Society, is designed to support an outstanding doctoral student at an American university who is conducting dissertation research.

American-Scandinavian Foundation
The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) offers fellowships (up to $23,000) and grants (up to $5,000) to individuals to pursue research or study in one or more Scandinavian country for up to one year. The number of awards varies each year according to total funds available. Over $300,000 is available for the 2013-14 competition. Awards are made in all fields.

Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarships in Migration Studies
The world is in motion: people and ideas, products, technologies and diseases are travelling between regions and continents. Cities and cultures as well as family and labour market relations are changing in these processes of globalization. Nation states are less capable to regulate policy areas independently. The movement of people is only one factor among others generating change, but one whose importance will rise over the next years. Migrants are settling into societies that are themselves transforming. Integration thus becomes a moving target. Everyone needs to be prepared to embrace change. Some migrants will also keep multi-stranded relations with their countries of origin, thereby building transnational spaces; others will after little time move on to third countries. All of them settle into motion. How can migrants and their receiving and sending countries reap the benefits of this movement of people? Which structural and procedural conditions have to be in place to take advantage of diversity? And what are the challenges for the individual, the migrant family, the regions and countries migrants come from as well as the places of reception? With its Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarship Program “Settling Into Motion”, the ZEIT-Stiftung seeks to address these questions, each year focusing on a different topic.

Camargo Foundation
The Camargo Foundation maintains a study center in Cassis, France, for the benefit of scholars who wish to pursue projects in the humanities and social sciences related to French and francophone cultures. The Foundation also sponsors creative projects by writers, visual artists, photographers, video artists, filmmakers, media artists and composers. The Camargo fellowship is a residential grant. Fellows who need additional funds for living or research expenses should apply for them from other sources.

Chateaubriand Fellowships (Bourses Chateaubriand en Sciences Sociales et Literature)

Chateaubriand Humanities & Social Sciences (HSS) is a fellowship program offered by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US. It targets outstanding Ph.D. students from American universities who seek to engage in research in France, in any discipline of the Humanities and Social Sciences. HSS Chateaubriand fellows are selected through a merit-based competition, through a binational collaborative process involving expert evaluators from both countries.

Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange

Doctoral candidates who are non-ROC citizens and who are enrolled in an accredited university in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Central America, or South America may apply for financial support for writing dissertations in the field of Chinese Studies in the humanities and social sciences. Grants are available only to doctoral candidates who are neither employed nor receiving grants from other sources. Applicants should have completed all other requirements for their Ph.D. degree, and must be in the last stage of their doctoral program. The maximum amount of each award is $15,000, which is given for a period extending to one year. Successful candidates are expected to complete their dissertations by the end of the grant period. Funding for successful applications will be provided in two installments (July and January). The completed thesis should be submitted to the Foundation when the project is finished.

CAORC (Council of American Overseas Research Centers) Multi-Country Research Fellowship
The Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) Multi-Country Fellowship Program supports advanced regional or trans-regional research in the humanities, social sciences, or allied natural sciences for U.S. doctoral candidates and scholars who have already earned their Ph.D. Preference will be given to candidates examining comparative and/or cross-regional research. Applicants are eligible to apply as individuals or in teams. Scholars must carry out research in two or more countries outside the United States, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center. Approximately nine awards of up to $10,500 each will be given.

Dan David Prize Scholarship (Tel Aviv University)
The Dan David Prize laureates annually donate twenty scholarships of US$15,000 each to outstanding doctoral and postdoctoral students of exceptional promise in the chosen fields for the current year. Ten scholarships are awarded to doctoral and post-doctoral students at universities throughout the world and ten scholarships at Tel Aviv University. The Dan David Prize is granted according to merit, without discrimination based on gender, race, religion, nationality, or political affiliation. In order to ensure that your research is relevant to one of this year's chosen fields, please read the field definitions on our website carefully before filling out the form.

Dumbarton Oaks
Dumbarton Oaks is a research institute of Harvard University that exists to further and publish research in the three areas of study supported by Robert Woods Bliss and Mildred Barnes Bliss: Byzantine Studies, including related aspects of late Roman, early Christian, western Medieval, Slavic, and Near Eastern Studies; Pre-Columbian Studies of Mexico, Central America, and Andean South America; and Garden and Landscape Studies, including garden history, landscape architecture, and related disciplines. Residential fellowships for an academic year, semester, or summer are awarded in all three areas of study to scholars from around the world. In addition, Dumbarton Oaks offers one-month non-residential stipends to researchers and short-term pre-doctoral residencies to advanced graduate students.

EPA-STAR (Environmental Protection Agency-Science to Achieve Results) Fellowships for Graduate Environmental Study
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as part of its Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program, is offering Graduate Fellowships for master’s and doctoral level students in environmental fields of study. The deadline for submission of applications is November 27, 2012 at 11:59:59 PM. Subject to availability of funding and other applicable considerations, the Agency plans to award approximately 80 new fellowships in the late summer of 2013. Master's level students may receive support for a maximum of two years. Doctoral students may be supported for a maximum of three years, usable over a period of five years. The fellowship program provides up to $42,000 per year of support per fellowship.

Firebird Foundation Program for Oral Literature
The unique oral literatures of indigenous peoples are rapidly being lost through the death of the traditional practitioners and through the schooling of the next generation. The Program for Oral Literature of the Firebird Foundation has initiated a project to fund the collection of this body of rapidly disappearing literature. This literature may consist of ritual texts, curative chants, epic poems, musical genres, folk tales, songs, myths, legends, historical accounts, life history narratives, word games, and so on. Supplemental funds are available to anthropologists and linguists going into the field to support a collection of oral literature. Grants of up to $10,000 will be made to applicants for purchasing recording equipment and covering the expenses of collecting this material. Applicants are encouraged, where possible, to foster the development of local teams of collectors to continue the work of recording these materials. Transcriptions of the recordings are encouraged.

Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies, Inc
The purpose of the Foundation Research Grants is to support scholarly works with the potential for significant contributions to the understanding of ancient Mesoamerican cultures and continuities thereof among the indigenous cultures in modern Mesoamerica (México, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador). The Foundation supports projects in the disciplines of archaeology, art history, epigraphy, linguistics, ethnohistory, ethnography, and sociology. The Foundation encourages interdisciplinary projects, especially those that combine disciplines in novel and potentially productive ways. Click to view the Summary of Grants Requested and Funded to Date.

Graham Foundation Carter Manny Award
Since the Carter Manny Award’s establishment in 1996, over $600,000 has been awarded in recognition of outstanding doctoral students whose work represents some of the most innovative and advanced scholarship on architecture and its role in the arts, culture, and society. The Carter Manny Award supports dissertation research and writing by promising scholars whose projects have architecture as their primary concern and focus and have the potential to shape contemporary discourse about architecture and impact the field. Projects may be drawn from the various fields of inquiry supported by the Graham Foundation: architectural  history, theory, and criticism; design; engineering; landscape architecture; urban planning; urban studies; the visual arts; and other related fields.

Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy
The Foundation makes targeted grants for work in major areas of the social sciences, including anthropology, area studies, economics, political science, psychology, sociology, and urban studies, as well as newer areas such as evaluation research. Preference will be given to projects that deal with contemporary issues in the social sciences and issues of policy relevance. Awards are not allocated so as to ensure a representative base of disciplines, but are approved solely on merit. Applicants are not required to be U.S. citizens or U.S. residents. Candidates may propose new projects, and they may also solicit support for research in progress, including final work on a dissertation, supplementing research in progress, or travel funds. Awards are only open to aspiring PhDs at the dissertation level whose project has recieved approval from their apporpriate department head/university.

HUD Doctoral Dissertation Research Grant Program
The Doctoral Dissertation Research Grant program is intended to stimulate policy-relevant urban research in several ways: by encouraging doctoral candidates to pursue research topics in community, housing, and urban development; by assisting doctoral candidates in the timely completion of the dissertation research; and by providing an arena for new scholars to share their research findings.

Alexander von Humbolt Foundation German Chancellor Fellowships
The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation’s German Chancellor Fellowship Programme is for university graduates from the United States, the Russian Federation and the People’s Republic of China with an interest in international issues and demonstrated leadership potential. The programme is targeted at accomplished young professionals who are likely to become decision-makers, thought leaders, and influential voices in their respective fields. Fellows will be recruited from a broad range of areas such as politics and public policy, law, media, business, the non-governmental sector, and the arts. The programme provides fellows the opportunity to spend one year in Germany, where they will network with other prospective leaders from abroad and explore new solutions to the global issues of our times. This prestigious programme builds on Germany’s established and growing reputation as a favored destination for problem-focused international dialogue and a meeting place for tomorrow’s international leaders.

Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion (IMTFI), UC Irvine
Welcome to the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion. Established in 2008, the Institute is housed in the School of Social Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. Its mission is to support research on money and technology among the world's poorest people: those who live on less than $1 per day. We seek to create a community of practice and inquiry into the everyday uses and meanings of money, as well as examining the technological infrastructures being developed as carriers of mainstream and alternative currencies worldwide.

Institute of Turkish Studies
Since 1983, the Institute of Turkish Studies (ITS) has sponsored an annual grant program that offers a variety of awards to scholars, colleges and universities in the United States. The principal purpose of the grant program is to support and encourage the development of research, scholarship, and learning in the field of Turkish Studies in the U.S. All grant applications submitted to the Institute are evaluated by committees comprised of the academic members of the Board of Governors and Associate Members of the ITS. These standing committees present their recommendations to the Board of Governors for approval. The Institute of Turkish Studies (ITS) will offer grants and fellowships in the field of Ottoman and Modern Turkish Studies to graduate students, post-doctoral scholars, universities, and other educational institutions through its Grants Program for the 2013-2014 academic year. The annual budget for the Grants Program has been significantly expanded and ITS encourages qualified applicants to apply for its grants. For detailed application guidelines and downloadable application forms, please click on the grant category of your choice. Please note the new application guidelines for each grant category.

IREX-Individual Advanced Research Opportunities (IARO)
The Individual Advanced Research Opportunities Program (IARO) provides scholars and professionals with long-term support to perform policy-relevant research in the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia.
IARO provides research support in up to three countries for a minimum of two months and a maximum of nine months. Participants are provided with visa assistance, international round-trip transportation, a monthly allowance for housing and living expenses, as well as emergency evacuation insurance. IARO fellows also have access to resources available in any of IREX's field offices.

Jacobs Research Fund, Whatcom Museum Society
The Jacobs Research Funds, hosted by the Whatcom Museum in Bellingham, Washington, provides grants for anthropological and linguistic research working with Native American (First Nations) peoples. Grants are given for work on problems in language, social organization, political organization, religion, mythology, music, other arts, psychology and folk science. Priority is given to research on the Pacific Northwest (the Pacific Coast from Northern California to Alaska and the Columbia Plateau in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon and Idaho). However, research on other areas in Canada, the continental United States, Alaska, Mexico, Central America and South America will be funded if possible.

Japan Foundation
For research about Japan. Doctoral candidates in the humanities or social sciences. Applicants must have achieved ABD status by the time the fellowship begins.

Kobe College Corporation Japan Education Exchange - Graduate Fellowships Program
The KCC Japan Education Exchange Graduate Fellowships Program was established in 1996 to support qualified graduate students for research or study in Japan. The purpose of the fellowship is to support future American educators who will teach more effectively about Japan. Up to five travel grants for a maximum of $2000 each will be awarded in 2012-2013.

Korea Foundation Fellowships for Korean Studies (Field Research)
This fellowship support program is designed to encourage Korean Studies research by doctorate-level students and prominent scholars through the sponsorship of their visit to Korea so that they can conduct onsite field research, gather pertinent data, access resource materials, and develop personal relations with Korean specialists.

Lady Davis Fellowship Trust
The Lady Davis Fellowship Trust was established 38 years ago to provide the opportunity for leading scientists and scholars, Post-doctoral Researchers and Doctoral Students from abroad, regardless of nationality, gender or field of scholarship to teach, study and participate in research in Israel at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and at the Technion Institute of Technology in Haifa.  

Lincoln Institute of Land Policy Dissertation Fellowships
The Lincoln Institute's C. Lowell Harriss Dissertation Fellowship Program assists Ph.D. students, primarily at U.S. universities, whose research complements the Institute's interests in land and tax policy. The program provides an important link between the Institute's educational mission and its research objectives by supporting scholars early in their careers. Dissertation fellowship applications are due February 1, 2013 (midnight EST). The awards will be announced by April 30, 2013. Guidelines for this fellowship program, named for the Columbia University economist and longtime member of the Lincoln Institute board, are available below.

Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture

The purpose of the Foundation's Doctoral Scholarship Program is to help train qualified individuals for careers in Jewish scholarship and research, and to help Jewish educational, religious, and communal workers obtain advanced training for leadership positions.

National Institute of Health - Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Predoctoral Fellowships
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) will award Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Institutional Research Training Grants (T32) to eligible institutions as the primary means of supporting predoctoral and postdoctoral research training to help ensure that a diverse and highly trained workforce is available to assume leadership roles related to the Nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research agenda.  The objective of the T32 program is to prepare qualified individuals for careers that have a significant impact on the health-related research needs of the Nation. This program supports predoctoral and postdoctoral research training programs (including those with short term research training) at domestic institutions of higher education with the T32 funding mechanism.

Organization of American States/Regular Training Program (PRA)
The OAS Academic Scholarship Program (Regular Program), established in 1958, grants scholarships every year for the pursuit of Master’s Degrees, Doctoral Degrees and Research leading to a degree. The OAS Special Caribbean Scholarships Program (SPECAF), established in 1983, grants scholarships for the last two years of undergraduate studies to citizens and residents of the English-speaking Caribbean OAS Member States. Both programs follow the OAS Manual of Procedures for the Scholarship and Training Program. In addition to these programs the OAS, through its Partnerships Program for Education and Training (PAEC), is able to offer other attractive scholarship opportunities for academic studies with the support of its partner institutions in the Americas and around the world. PAEC is administered in accordance with the provision of the respective corporation agreement and in line with the principles set forth in the OAS Manual of Procedures for the Scholarship and Training Program.

Palestinian American Research Center
The Palestinian American Research Center (PARC) announces its first National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions (FPIRI) competition for post-doctoral fellowships for research in Palestine. Important information about the fellowship competition: Fields of study include, but are not limited to, history, philosophy, religious studies, literature, literary criticism, and visual and performing arts. In addition, research that embraces a humanistic approach and methods will be considered. Applicants must be post-doctoral scholars. Applicants must propose a minimum of four consecutive months of research and a maximum of eight consecutive months of research that takes place in the West Bank. Selected fellows must work on their research full-time during their period of funding. Fellowship recipients must be U.S. citizens or have lived in the United States for a minimum of three years immediately preceding the application deadline.

Program for Cultural Cooperation
Support for research in Spain.

Virginia Foundation for the Humanities
The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities offers residential fellowships to scholars and writers in the humanities. We seek applications that are intellectually stimulating, imaginative, and accessible to the public. There are no restrictions on topic, and applications are invited from across the broad spectrum of the humanities.

Post-fieldwork / Writing Fellowships
 

American Anthropological Association Minority Dissertation Fellowship Program
The American Anthropological Association invites minority doctoral candidates in anthropology to apply for a dissertation writing fellowship of $10,000. The annual AAA Minority Dissertation Fellowship is intended to encourage members of ethnic minorities to complete doctoral degrees in anthropology, thereby increasing diversity in the discipline and/or promoting research on issues of concern among minority populations. Dissertation topics in all areas of the discipline are welcome. Doctoral students who require financial assistance to complete the write-up phase of the dissertation are urged to apply.

Academy Scholars Program, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies
The Academy Scholars Program identifies and supports outstanding scholars at the start of their careers whose work combines disciplinary excellence in the social sciences (including history and law) with a command of the language, history, or culture of non-Western countries or regions. Their scholarship may elucidate domestic, comparative, or transnational issues, past or present. The Academy Scholars are a select community of individuals with resourcefulness, initiative, curiosity, and originality, whose work in non-Western cultures or regions shows promise as a foundation for exceptional careers in major universities or international institutions. Academy Scholars are appointed for two years by the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies and are provided time, guidance, and access to Harvard University facilities. They receive substantial financial and research assistance to undertake sustained projects of research and/or acquire accessory training in their chosen fields and areas. The Senior Scholars, a distinguished group of senior Harvard University faculty members, act as mentors to the Academy Scholars to help them achieve their intellectual potential.

ACLS / Mellon Dissertation Completion Fellowships
ACLS invites applications for the seventh annual competition for the Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships, which support a year of research and writing to help advanced graduate students in the humanities and related social sciences in the last year of Ph.D. dissertation writing. The program encourages timely completion of the Ph.D. Applicants must be prepared to complete their dissertations within the period of their fellowship tenure and no later than August 31, 2014. A grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation supports this program.

American Antiquarian Society
The American Antiquarian Society offers short-term visiting academic research fellowships tenable for one to three months each year.
The following short-term fellowships are available for scholars holding the Ph.D. and for doctoral candidates engaged in dissertation research. Candidates holding a recognized terminal degree appropriate to the area of proposed research, such as the master's degree in library science or M.F.A., are also eligible to apply.

American Association of University Women (AAUW)
Dissertation Fellowships are available to women who will complete their dissertation writing between July 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014. Applicants must have completed all course work, passed all preliminary examinations, and received approval for their research proposals or plans by the preceding November. Students holding fellowships for writing a dissertation in the year prior to the AAUW fellowships year are not eligible. Open to applicants in all fields of study. Scholars engaged in science, technology, engineering, and math fields or researching gender issues are especially encouraged to apply.

American Bar Foundation Doctoral Fellowships in Law and Social Science

For the Doctoral/Post-Doctoral Fellowships, applications are invited from outstanding students who are candidates for Ph.D. degrees in the social sciences.  Applicants must have completed all doctoral requirements except the dissertation by September 1, 2013.  Applicants who will have completed the dissertation prior to September 1, 2013 are also welcome to apply.  Doctoral and proposed research must be in the general area of sociolegal studies or in social scientific approaches to law, the legal profession, or legal institutions. The research must address significant issues in the field and show promise of a major contribution to social scientific understanding of law and legal process.  Minority students are especially encouraged to apply.

American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise – Schusterman Israel Scholar Awards
The Israel Scholar Development Fund of the American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise is pleased to offer awards to encourage students to pursue academic careers in fields related to the study of Israel. Awards will be available to undergraduates and college graduates who have already been accepted to a graduate program, graduate students who have received master’s degrees in Middle East related fields who wish to pursue a doctorate and doctoral students who are writing dissertations related to Israel.

American Philosophical Society – John Hope Franklin Dissertation Fellowships

The John Hope Franklin Dissertation Fellowship, named in honor of a distinguished member of the American Philosophical Society, is designed to support an outstanding doctoral student at an American university who is conducting dissertation research.

Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarships in Migration Studies
The world is in motion: people and ideas, products, technologies and diseases are travelling between regions and continents. Cities and cultures as well as family and labour market relations are changing in these processes of globalization. Nation states are less capable to regulate policy areas independently. The movement of people is only one factor among others generating change, but one whose importance will rise over the next years. Migrants are settling into societies that are themselves transforming. Integration thus becomes a moving target. Everyone needs to be prepared to embrace change. Some migrants will also keep multi-stranded relations with their countries of origin, thereby building transnational spaces; others will after little time move on to third countries. All of them settle into motion. How can migrants and their receiving and sending countries reap the benefits of this movement of people? Which structural and procedural conditions have to be in place to take advantage of diversity? And what are the challenges for the individual, the migrant family, the regions and countries migrants come from as well as the places of reception? With its Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarship Program “Settling Into Motion”, the ZEIT-Stiftung seeks to address these questions, each year focusing on a different topic.

Center for Comparative Immigration Studies UC-San Diego Visiting Research Fellowships
CCIS offers a limited number of Visiting Research Fellowships at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels each academic year. These awards are to support advanced research and writing on any aspect of international migration and refugee flows, in any of the social sciences, history, and law. Due to funding constraints, CCIS awards fellowships only to scholars who have a current or former affiliation with a University of California campus.

Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange
Doctoral candidates who are non-ROC citizens and who are enrolled in an accredited university in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Central America, or South America may apply for financial support for writing dissertations in the field of Chinese Studies in the humanities and social sciences. Grants are available only to doctoral candidates who are neither employed nor receiving grants from other sources. Applicants should have completed all other requirements for their Ph.D. degree, and must be in the last stage of their doctoral program. The maximum amount of each award is $15,000, which is given for a period extending to one year. Successful candidates are expected to complete their dissertations by the end of the grant period. Funding for successful applications will be provided in two installments (July and January). The completed thesis should be submitted to the Foundation when the project is finished.

Collegium Budapest Junior Fellowships
Scholars interested in a stay at the Collegium, and whose field of interest falls under the following categories [which includes anthropology] are welcome to apply. The institute focuses on the above-listed research areas; however, researchers working in other fields are also encouraged to apply. In fact, all academic disciplines are eligible, but candidates should take into consideration that the Collegium cannot provide laboratories. If you wish to apply, please write a letter indicating your interest, download the application form (junior, senior) and submit it, together with a Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages), a brief description of the research you would like to pursue (max. 3 pages), and the names of two scholars willing to write a short assessment of your qualifications (for senior applicants), while two reference letters (for junior applicants) to Zsuzsa Ágoston at info@colbud.hu.The application material will be presented to the Academic Advisory Board that considers all applications and makes recommendations to the Rector, who will make the final decision on the recipients of a Fellowship.Scholars may apply or be recommended by others to become fellows either for a period of one academic year (October through July) (in general) or for one semester (October through February, or March through July). If you wish to recommend someone for Fellowship, write us a letter indicating briefly why you think that scholar would be a suitable candidate for Fellowship at the Collegium.

Consortium for Faculty Diversity in Liberal Arts Colleges
The Consortium is committed to increasing the diversity of students, faculty members and curricular offerings at liberal arts colleges with a particular focus on enhancing the diversity of faculty members and of applicants for faculty positions.The Consortium was founded as an association of liberal arts colleges committed to strengthening the ethnic diversity of students and of faculty members at liberal arts colleges. The early goals of the Consortium with regard to faculty diversity included encouraging U.S. citizens who are members of under-represented minority groups to complete their graduate programs and to consider faculty employment in liberal arts colleges. The Consortium now invites applications for dissertation fellowships and post-doctoral fellowships from those who will contribute to increasing the diversity of member colleges by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, maximizing the educational benefits of diversity and/or increasing the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of students. Applicants must be able to provide evidence of U.S. citizenship or unconditional permanent resident status at the time of hire. Appointments to the fellowships are made by the member institutions according to local needs and local program guidelines under the general framework for dissertation fellowships and post-doctoral fellowships described by the Consortium.

Dissertation Fellowships at Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College invites applications for the Cesar Chavez/Charles A. Eastman/Thurgood Marshall Dissertation Fellowships from US citizens who plan careers in college or university teaching.  The goal of the Chavez/Eastman/Marshall fellowship program  is to promote student and faculty diversity at Dartmouth, and throughout higher education, by supporting completion of the doctorate by underrepresented minority scholars (including African-American, Latina/o, and Native American scholars) and other graduate scholars with a demonstrated commitment and ability to advance educational diversity.

Dan David Prize Scholarship (Tel Aviv University)
The Dan David Prize laureates annually donate twenty scholarships of US$15,000 each to outstanding doctoral and postdoctoral students of exceptional promise in the chosen fields for the current year. Ten scholarships are awarded to doctoral and post-doctoral students at universities throughout the world and ten scholarships at Tel Aviv University. The Dan David Prize is granted according to merit, without discrimination based on gender, race, religion, nationality, or political affiliation. In order to ensure that your research is relevant to one of this year's chosen fields, please read the field definitions on our website carefully before filling out the form.

Eisenhower Institute/Clifford Roberts Fellowships

The Eisenhower Institute is a nonpartisan organization dedicating to perpetuating Dwight  D. Eisenhower's legacy by fostering integrity and trust in the federal government, promoting broader understanding of democracy, and supporting leadership in public service. Through independent and collaborative programs, the Eisenhower Institute pursues this mission by: education; publications; conferences; scholarships; public policy studies; and recognition of the leadership contributions of individuals and organizations engaged in works carrying out the Eisenhower legacy. Applicants should be at an advanced stage of their doctoral candidacies, preferably at the point of preparing their dissertations. The Institute will consider, on written university recommendation in unique circumstances, applications of less advanced graduate students or of persons who have recently earned their doctorates and wish to pursue studies in the Institute's field of interest. Applicants are selected on merit and must be receiving their graduate degree from one of the following institutions: University of Chicago, Columbia University, Harvard University, Cornell University, Kansas University, Princeton University, University of Texas at Austin, University of Virginia, and Washington University at St. Louis, Stanford University, Vanderbilt University or The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

Frederick Douglass Institute for African and African-American Studies, University of Rochester
The Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded to a graduate student of any university whose degree contributes to the scholarship in the field of African and African-American Studies. A principal aim of this fellowship is to provide a different intellectual environment that will enrich and expedite the completion of the Fellow's dissertation. The Fellow will also gain valuable experience through work with the Institute's director in organizing colloquia, lectures, and other events. There is no teaching obligation. The award carries an annual stipend of $26,000, and the Institute offers research funds to support the fellow's research. To qualify for this residential fellowship in the 2013-14 academic year, an applicant will need to have successfully completed the following before the end of this (2012-13) academic year: (1) all required courses; (2) qualifying oral and/or written exams; (3) at least one chapter of the dissertation (this chapter is a required portion of the application package).

Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships
This year the program will award approximately 35 dissertation fellowships. The dissertation fellowships provide one year of support for individuals working to complete a dissertation leading to a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) or Doctor of Science (Sc.D.) degree.  Dissertation fellowships will be awarded in a national competition administered by the National Research Council (NRC) on behalf of the Ford Foundation. The awards will be made to individuals who, in the judgment of the review panels, have demonstrated superior academic achievement, are committed to a career in teaching and research at the college or university level, show promise of future achievement as scholars and teachers, and are well prepared to use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.

Graham Foundation Carter Manny Award

Since the Carter Manny Award’s establishment in 1996, over $600,000 has been awarded in recognition of outstanding doctoral students whose work represents some of the most innovative and advanced scholarship on architecture and its role in the arts, culture, and society. The Carter Manny Award supports dissertation research and writing by promising scholars whose projects have architecture as their primary concern and focus and have the potential to shape contemporary discourse about architecture and impact the field. Projects may be drawn from the various fields of inquiry supported by the Graham Foundation: architectural  history, theory, and criticism; design; engineering; landscape architecture; urban planning; urban studies; the visual arts; and other related fields.

Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Dissertation Fellowships
Dissertation fellowships of $15,000 to support work in any of the natural and social sciences and the humanities that promise to increase understanding of the causes, manifestations, and control of violence, aggression, and dominance. Highest priority is given to research that can increase understanding and amelioration of urgent problems of violence, aggression, and dominance in the modern world. Particular questions that interest the Foundation concern violence, aggression and dominance in relation to social change, the socialization of children, intergroup conflict, drug trafficking and use, family relationships and investigations of the control of aggression and violence. Fellows are expected to complete the dissertation within the award year.

Jacobs Research Fund, Whatcom Museum Society
The Jacobs Research Funds, hosted by the Whatcom Museum in Bellingham, Washington, provides grants for anthropological and linguistic research working with Native American (First Nations) peoples. Grants are given for work on problems in language, social organization, political organization, religion, mythology, music, other arts, psychology and folk science. Priority is given to research on the Pacific Northwest (the Pacific Coast from Northern California to Alaska and the Columbia Plateau in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon and Idaho). However, research on other areas in Canada, the continental United States, Alaska, Mexico, Central America and South America will be funded if possible.

Josephine de Kármán Fellowships
DeKarman fellowships are open to students in any discipline, including international students, who are currently enrolled in a university or college located within the United States. Only candidates for the PhD who will defend their dissertation by June 2014 and undergraduates entering their senior year (will receive bachelors degree in June 2014) are eligible for consideration. Postdoctoral and masters degree students are not eligible for consideration. Special consideration will be given to applicants in the Humanities.

Law & Society Association Law and Social Science Dissertation Fellowship and Mentoring Program
The LSA/ABF Law and Social Science Dissertation and Mentoring Fellowship (LSS Fellowship) is a collaborative effort of the Law and Society Association and the American Bar Foundation with funding from the Law and Social Science Program of the National Science Foundation. The fellowship is designed for third and fourth year graduate students who specialize in the field of law and social science and whose research interests include law and inequality. Fellowships are held in residence at the American Bar Foundation in Chicago, IL, where Fellows participate in the intellectual life of the ABF, including participation in a weekly seminar series. In addition, Fellows are partnered with an LSA mentor-at-large and a mentor at the ABF to work closely with the Fellow and his or her advisors at the home institution. Attendance at the Law and Society Association Meetings and the Graduate Student Workshop during the fellowship also are provided as part of the fellowship.

Library Company of Philadelphia and The Historical Society of Pennsylvania Visiting Research Fellowships in Colonial and US History and Culture
The Library Company of Philadelphia and The Historical Society of Pennsylvania will jointly award approximately twenty-five one-month fellowships for research in residence in either or both collections during the academic year 2013-2014. These two independent research libraries, adjacent to each other in Center City Philadelphia, have complementary collections capable of supporting research in a variety of fields and disciplines relating to the history of America and the Atlantic world from the 17th through the 19th centuries, as well as Mid-Atlantic regional history to the present.

Lincoln Institute of Land Policy Dissertation Fellowships
The Lincoln Institute's C. Lowell Harriss Dissertation Fellowship Program assists Ph.D. students, primarily at U.S. universities, whose research complements the Institute's interests in land and tax policy. The program provides an important link between the Institute's educational mission and its research objectives by supporting scholars early in their careers. Dissertation fellowship applications are due February 1, 2013 (midnight EST). The awards will be announced by April 30, 2013. Guidelines for this fellowship program, named for the Columbia University economist and longtime member of the Lincoln Institute board, are available below.

Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture
The purpose of the Foundation's Doctoral Scholarship Program is to help train qualified individuals for careers in Jewish scholarship and research, and to help Jewish educational, religious, and communal workers obtain advanced training for leadership positions.

Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships
The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships are designed to encourage original and significant study of ethical or religious values in all fields of the humanities and social sciences, and particularly to help Ph.D. candidates in these fields complete their dissertation work in a timely manner. In addition to topics in religious studies or in ethics (philosophical or religious), dissertations appropriate to the Newcombe Fellowship competition might explore the ethical implications of foreign policy, the values influencing political decisions, the moral codes of other cultures, and religious or ethical issues reflected in history or literature.

Erskine A. Peters Dissertation Year Fellowship at Notre Dame
The Peters Fellowship, as it was commonly called, had two overall goals: 1) to enable outstanding African American doctoral candidates in the social sciences and humanities, at the ABD level, to devote their full energies to the completion of the dissertation and 2) to provide opportunities for African American scholars to experience life at the University of Notre Dame, a major Catholic research institution.

The Ann Plato Fellowship, Trinity College, Hartford, CT
Trinity College invites applications for a one-year pre- or post-doctoral fellowship to promote diversity at our nationally recognized liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut. Ann Plato Fellows will join the faculty in one of our 30 academic departments or interdisciplinary programs, interact regularly with colleagues and students on campus, and work on their own research. Pre-doctoral fellows will teach one course during the year; post-doctoral fellows will teach two courses. Eligibility: Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents who will contribute to enhancing diversity at Trinity College by increasing ethnic and racial diversity, maximizing the educational benefits of diversity, and/or increasing the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of students.   Pre-doctoral applicants must demonstrate that they will complete all terminal degree requirements (except the dissertation) before beginning the fellowship year. Post-doctoral (or post-MFA) applicants should have no more than five years of teaching or relevant experience subsequent to earning their doctorate.

Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowships for Research Related to Education
The Dissertation Fellowship Program seeks to encourage a new generation of scholars from a wide range of disciplines and professional fields to undertake research relevant to the improvement of education. These $25,000 fellowships support individuals whose dissertations show potential for bringing fresh and constructive perspectives to the history, theory, or practice of formal or informal education anywhere in the world. This highly competitive program aims to identify the most talented researchers conducting dissertation research related to education. Like all Spencer Foundation programs, the Dissertation Fellowship program receives many more applications than it can fund. This year, up to 600 applications are anticipated and up to 25 fellowships will be awarded.

SSRC Korean Studies Dissertation Workshop
The SSRC Korean Studies Dissertation Workshop seeks to create a sustained network of advanced graduate students and faculty by providing the opportunity to give and receive critical feedback on dissertations in progress. The workshop is open to participants from all fields in the social sciences and humanities and from institutions throughout the US and Canada. Individual students lead discussions of their projects with mentor faculty and student peers from various disciplines to receive creative and critical input on improving their fieldwork plans or writing strategies. Based on narrative project descriptions submitted as part of the application packet, participants will prepare a synthetic essay incorporating all projects, from which broader methodological and thematic discussions will be developed and incorporated into the four-day agenda.

UC Davis Chicana/Latina Dissertation Fellowship
The Chicana/ Latina Research Center (C/LRC) at the University of California, Davis, is dedicated to the development and promotion of Chicana/ Latina scholars and scholarship on Chicana/ Latina issues covering a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary interests. This dissertation fellowship program supports emerging scholars whose research focuses on questions of concern to Chicanas/ Latinas. We also invite comparative studies of Chicanas/Latinas and indigenous women.

US Institute of Peace - Peace Scholar Dissertation Fellowships
The Jennings Randolph (JR) Peace scholarship Dissertation Program awards scholarships to students at U.S. universities who are writing doctoral dissertations on topics related to international peace, conflict, and security.
Each year the program awards approximately ten Peace Scholar Fellowships. The fellowships last for 10 months, starting in September. Fellowships are open to citizens of any country and dissertation projects in all disciplines are welcome.

Williams College - Gaius Charles Bolin Fellowships for Minority Graduate Students
The Gaius Charles Bolin Fellowships at Williams College are designed to promote diversity on college faculties by encouraging students from underrepresented groups to complete a terminal graduate degree and to pursue careers in college teaching.The Bolin Fellowships are two-year residencies at Williams, and up to three scholars or artists are appointed each year. Fellows devote the bulk of the first year to the completion of dissertation work—or in the case of MFA applicants, building their professional portfolios—while also teaching one course as a faculty member in one of the College’s academic departments or programs. The second year of residency (ideally with degree in hand) is spent on academic career development while again teaching just one course. Eligibility: The Bolin Fellowships are awarded to applicants from underrepresented groups, including ethnic minorities, those who are first-generation college graduates, women in predominately male fields, or disabled scholars.

Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Grants in Women’s Studies
The Women’s Studies Fellowships are provided to Ph.D. candidates at institutions in the United States who will complete their dissertations during the fellowship year. The most competitive applications include not only a clear, thorough, and compelling description of the candidate’s work, but also evidence of an enduring interest in and commitment to women’s issues and scholarship on women.
The Women’s Studies competition is for projects in the humanities and social sciences; projects in fields such as management, the clinical and biological sciences, and law are not eligible unless they have a demonstrable academic grounding in the humanities and social sciences. Applicants working on health-related issues in the social sciences should consider carefully whether their work demonstrably centers on the topic’s social, cultural, and individual aspects.

Woodrow Wilson Center/East European Studies Short Term Grants
EES offers short-term grants to scholars working on policy relevant projects on East Europe. While Southeast Europe remains a primary focus, projects on Central Europe and the Baltic states are again eligible. Projects should focus on fields in the social sciences and humanities including, but not limited to: Anthropology, History, Political Science, Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Sociology. All projects should aim to highlight their potential policy relevance.

Woodrow Wilson Center/East European Studies/Junior Scholars’ Training Seminar
East European Studies of the Woodrow Wilson Center and the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research are soliciting applications for the twenty fourth annual training seminar for junior scholars in East European studies, to be held during August, 2013. All domestic transportation, accommodation and meal costs will be covered by the sponsors. Eligibility: These scholarships are available to U.S. citizens. While Southeast Europe remains a primary focus, projects on Central Europe and the Baltic states are again eligible. Projects should focus on fields in the social sciences and humanities including, but not limited to: Anthropology, History, Political Science, Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Sociology. All projects should aim to highlight their potential policy relevance. Disciplines represented at JSTS 2012 included: anthropology; history; political science; and sociology.

Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, Univ. of Virginia
Since its inception in 1981, the Woodson Institute’s Residential Fellowship Program has attracted outstanding scholars in the humanities and social sciences who work on a wide array of topics in African-American and African Studies, as well as related fields. These two-year fellowships—offered at the pre-doctoral and post-doctoral levels—are designed to facilitate the writing of dissertations or manuscripts and provide successful applicants the opportunity to discuss and exchange works-in-progress both with each other and the larger intellectual community of the University. Preference is given to applicants whose research is substantially completed, thus providing them the maximum amount of time to complete their manuscripts within the fellowship term. Post-doctoral fellows are expected to teach one upper-division seminar each year within the African-American and African Studies Program on a topic chosen in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Please see the guidelines in the Instructions and Application sections for more information about the fellowship program.