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Work of Ellen Contini-Morava & Eve Danziger to be Presented at Belize Archaeology and Anthropology Symposium

Wednesday, 20 June 2012

— from Ellen Contini-Morava

Professor Contini-Morava will present a paper jointly written with Eve Danziger at the Belize Archaeology and Anthropology Symposium, San Ignacio, Belize on June 26.

The paper, "Introducing referents in Mopan Maya", is a preliminary report on the Mopan language project that they have been working on together since 2011, including a brief field trip to Southern Belize last summer. 

 

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Ethnocentrism, Virginia Style

Tuesday, 19 June 2012

— from The Huffington Post

The recent firing of University of Virginia (UVA) President Teresa Sullivan is a classic case of what anthropologists call ethnocentrism. It is a clear example of how ethnocentric thinking produces devastating social, political and educational results.

Most anthropologists say that you are ethnocentric when you use your own set of rules, procedures and beliefs to make judgments about other people who don't share your view of the world. I tell my anthropology students that there are two kinds of ethnocentrism. The first kind, which I like to call "my way or the highway" ethnocentrism, is characterized like....(Read more)

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Anthropologist's NSF Project Tracks Gun Control in West Africa

Monday, 18 June 2012

— from UVA Today

With al Qaeda and Latin American drug cartels moving into some parts of Africa, small arms control has become a matter of great concern to those involved with security. Anthropologist Niklas Hultin, who taught in the University of Virginia's Global Development Studies program last year, is researching issues concerning gun control in Gambia on the west coast – a gateway for illegal trafficking.

Hultin, who will be a research professor in the College of Arts & SciencesDepartment of Anthropology, has studied human rights, democracy and African legal institutions. He recently received a National Science Foundation grant to return to Gambia to research small arms use in West Africa, international small arms control and anti-transnational crime initiatives, he said. The Isaac Newton Trust at Cambridge University is also contributing funding for his two-year project....(Read more)

 

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President Sullivan's Ouster: Anthropology & Linguistics Heads Join Campus-wide Outcry, Sign Letter of Protest

Wednesday, 13 June 2012

— from Dionisios Kavadias

The Department of Anthropology's Chairs Fred Damon (acting) and Susan McKinnon (incoming), and the LInguistics Program Director, Ellen Contini-Morava, participated in the camus-wide discussion with other faculty and staff leaders about the sudden dismissal of President Sullivan earlier this week. The resulting Letter of Concern and Protest, addressed to Rector Helen Dragas and reprinted below, bears their signatures.

12 June 2012

Dear Rector Dragas and members of the Board of Visitors:

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Yu-Chien Huang Awarded World Austronesian Studies Fieldwork Grant

Thursday, 24 May 2012

— from Ira Bashkow

Yu-Chien Huang has been awarded a second major grant to support her fieldwork on the Yap Islands of Micronesia.

This World Austronesian Studies Fieldwork Grant for PhD Students comes from the World Austronesian Studies Project, an International Scholarly Exchange and Academic Research project commissioned by Taiwan's Bureau of International Cultural and Educational Affairs, in the Ministry of Education. Click here for details.

Congratulations, Yu-Chien!

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Sherri Lynn Colby-Bottel to Lecture at California State University

Wednesday, 23 May 2012

— from Eve Danziger

Warmest congratulations to recent Ph.D. graduate Sherri Lynn Colby-Bottel (2012), who has accepted a position as Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at California State University, Fresno, for 2012-2013.

 

 

 

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Rose Wellman, Lydia Rodriguez: Co-winners of 2011-12 Best Dissertation Chapter Award

Tuesday, 22 May 2012

— from Eve Danziger

Warmest congratulations to Lydia Rodriguez and Rose Wellman, who are the joint winners of the 2011-12 UVa Anthropology Department Award for Best Dissertation Chapter.

The two main criteria which guided the judges' decision process were 1) the clarity of each writer's main ideas and arguments and 2) the significance of the work to anthropology as a whole, considering its portability to other ethnographic contexts. The two winners did exceptionally well in each of these two categories. The judges also considered each submission's use of literature, definitions of key terms, accessibility to non-specialists, and interest for the reader, with respect to the question "Would I like to read more of this dissertation?" For each submission - not only the winners' - the judges answered this last question in the affirmative. The judges commend the writers for their efforts and look forward to reading their future contributions to the discipline of anthropology.

 
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Dannah Dennis Wins Best Class Essay

Tuesday, 22 May 2012

— from Eve Danziger

Congratulations to Dannah Dennis, who has won the Department of Anthropology graduate student award for Best Class Essay in 2011-12.

Judges remarked that all entrants in this category were deserving of praise. The winning essay was chosen for writing that "flows beautifully", as well as for an intriguing choice of topic (an analysis of the movie 'CARS'), and deft analysis of character.

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Award for Best Teaching Assistant in Anthropology Goes to David Flood

Tuesday, 22 May 2012

— from Eve Danziger

Congratulations to David Flood, who has won the Anthropology graduate student award for Best Teaching Assistant in Anthropology for 2011-12.

The applicants for this award all submitted excellent evaluations and insightful statements of teaching philosophy, thus making the decision a very difficult one for the judges.

David earned the win based on his teaching evaluations and statement of teaching philosophy.  From the comments, it is clear that students not only learned a lot about the history of anthropology from David, but also felt comfortable and thoroughly enjoyed participating in his class.  One student even felt the urge to describe Mr. Flood as an “AWESOME DUDE” - in all-caps! Most importantly, students appreciated his ability to make theory easier to comprehend, an ability which one student characterizes as “explaining difficult concepts in more understandable language.”

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Roberto Armengol Named Best Graduate Student Instructor 2012-13

Tuesday, 22 May 2012

— from Eve Danziger

Congratulations to Roberto Armengol for winning the 2011-12 Department of Anthropology award for Best Graduate Student Instructor.

The Best Graduate Student Instructor Award is given to the post-field graduate student who most exemplifies what it means to teach anthropology. A few of the key criteria most important to this year's judges include the candidate's attention to explaining and promoting anthropology's role within the global scheme of the Academy, and also making it relevant and insightful to students' everyday experiences. Also important was the candidate's ability to frame courses in a way that--through assignments, classroom activities, and overall organization of themes--is pedagogically creative and mindful of students' abilities to actively contribute to intellectual dialogue. The judges were pleased to see all candidates approach the teaching of anthropology with a level of professionalism, but also intellectual thoughtfulness, that makes them all worthy of praise.

Indeed, all applicants showed an impressive measure of the above virtues and all deserve our admiration and respect.

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Yu-Chien Huang Awarded 2012 Academia Sinica Fellowship

Friday, 11 May 2012

— from Ira Bashkow

Yu-Chien Huang has been awarded a 2012 Academia Sinica Fellowship for Doctoral Candidates in the Humanities and Social Sciences. This prestigious award by Taiwan's Academia Sinica will support her fieldwork on kinship, gender, food, and hierarchy on the Yap islands in Micronesia.

Congratulations, Yu-Chien!

 
 
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Two U.Va. Anthropology Students Receive Davis Prize for Guatemala Project

Tuesday, 8 May 2012

— from UVA Today 

With al Qaeda and Latin American drug cartels moving into some parts of Africa, small arms control has become a matter of great concern to those involved with security. Anthropologist Niklas Hultin, who taught in the University of Virginia's Global Development Studies program last year, is researching issues concerning gun control in Gambia on the west coast – a gateway for illegal trafficking.

Hultin, who will be a research professor in the College of Arts & SciencesDepartment of Anthropology, has studied human rights, democracy and African legal institutions. He recently received a National Science Foundation grant to return to Gambia to research small arms use in West Africa, international small arms control and anti-transnational crime initiatives, he said. The Isaac Newton Trust at Cambridge University is also contributing funding for his two-year project....(Read more)

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Roberto Armengol Wins Jefferson Dissertation Year Fellowship 2012-2013

Tuesday, 8 May 2012

— from Ira Bashkow

Roberto Armengol has been awarded a Jefferson Dissertation Year Fellowship for 2012-2013. This fellowship, which is one of just two being given out across GSAS by the Jefferson Scholars Foundation, will support him in writing his dissertation on the changing role of the state in the Cuban informal economy.

Congratulations, Roberto! 

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Lydia Wilson Marshall Becomes Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Gettysburg College

Wednesday, 2 May 2012

Lydia Wilson Marshall (Ph.D. 2011) has accepted a one-year position as Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, PA for the 2012-2013 academic year.

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Amy Nichols-Belo to Teach at Randolph-Macon College

Monday, 30 April 2012

— from Eve Danziger

Congratulations to dissertating Ph.D. student Amy Nichols-Belo, who has been appointed Visiting Instructor of Sociology and Anthropology at Randolph-Macon College for the 2012-2013 academic year. In addition to teaching Anthropology courses, Amy will also be teaching in the Women's Studies program at Randolph-Macon.

 

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Two Undergrads Start with Chaco Canyon, Move on to Graduate School

Friday, 27 April 2012

— from Stephen Plog

Kudos to two of our undergraduates, Kate Bishop and Carrie Mongle, who have received five-year financial packages to begin their graduate studies next fall. Kate will be attending UCLA where she will focus on the archaeology of Mesoamerica and the American Southwest. Kate received her B.A. in 2011 from UVa after writing a senior honors thesis and working for the Chaco Archive for two years. This year she has continued to work for the Chaco Archive while also serving as an intern at the Smithsonian. Carrie will be attending SUNY-Stony Brook where she will pursue her interest in hominid evolution, particularly Neanderthals. She is currently writing a senior honors thesis and will graduate next month. Like Kate, she has worked for the Chaco Archive for the last few years. Kate and Carrie are now the 5th and 6th undergraduates in the last five years who have helped us build the Chaco Archive and then have headed to graduate school.

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Virginia Busby ('09) Wins Wilcomb Washburn Award

Thursday, 19 April 2012

— from Eve Danziger

Congratulations to recent graduate Virginia Busby (Ph.D. 2009) who has been named the recipient of the Wilcomb Washburn Award for her dissertation “Transformation and Persistence: The Nanticoke Indians and Chicone Indian Town in the Context of European Contact and Colonization.”

The award recognizes new research deemed to be of great significance to the cultural history of the Chesapeake/Eastern Shore region of the Eastern U.S. It has only been granted four times in the past decade.

Congratulations Virginia!

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Radio Australia Interviews Lise Dobrin about Arapesh Language

Thursday, 12 April 2012

— from Radio Australia

A United States-based linguist is trying to stop a language in Papua New Guinea from becoming extinct.

Lise Dobrin from the University of Virginia first recorded the Arapesh language fifteen years ago.

After winning a fellowship from the university, she's working with some middle-aged and younger Arapesh speakers to develop the Arapesh Grammar and Digital Language Archive online.

Presenter: Geraldine Coutts

Speaker: Lise Dobrin, a linguist from the University of Virginia

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Rose Wellman Wins Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship

Thursday, 5 April 2012

— from Susan McKinnon

The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships are designed to encourage original and significant study of ethical or religious values in all fields of the humanities and social sciences, and particularly to help Ph.D. candidates in these fields complete their dissertation work in a timely manner. In addition to topics in religious studies or in ethics (philosophical or religious), dissertations appropriate to the Newcombe Fellowship competition might explore the ethical implications of foreign policy, the values influencing political decisions, the moral codes of other cultures, and religious or ethical issues reflected in history or literature.

Rose Wellman's current research focuses on kinship in urban Iran, specifically, gendered notions of procreation. She received her BA from Mount Holyoke College in 2005 and also has background in fieldwork among Penobscot Native Americans in Maine.

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Todne Thomas Chipumuro Joins Department of Religion, University of Vermont

Thursday, 5 April 2012

— from Dionisios Kavadias

Dr. Todne Thomas Chipumuro has been appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Religion at the University of Vermont, beginning January 2013.

In 2004,  she received her B.A. in anthropology and Africana Studies from Cornell University, where she cultivated an ongoing interest in Caribbean migration and family studies through qualitative research on West Indian migrant child care businesses in Brooklyn, New York as well as coursework completed at the University of the West Indies in Mona, Jamaica. Dr. Chipumuro's dissertation research applied her specialization in Anglo-Caribbean kinship to analyze the church relationships of a West Indian evangelical denomination. 

Congratulations from us all, Todne! 

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