1. University of Virginia
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Faculty

Jernigan

As a critical medical anthropologist, my research focuses on obesity (and related chronic conditions) at the intersections of issues related to structural violence, historical trauma, heritage narratives, and meaning-making among Indigenous communities in Oklahoma. Using collaborative and participatory methods, my research examines the socio-cultural, economic, political, and historical influences of health, while centering tribal citizens’ personal stories and meaning-making in these processes.

Alconini

I am an anthropological archaeologist who specializes in the rise of sociopolitical complexity in ancient pre-Columbian societies. Originally from Bolivia, I have conducted research in the Andes for several decades. I am particularly interested in exploring the frontiers of the Inka empire, and the ways in which these contested spaces affected on the dynamics of ancient borderland populations.

Tidey

I am a cultural anthropologist with an interest in the ethics of care in family intimacies amid particular socio–political notions of the good life.

Zigon

My interests include the anthropology of moralities and ethics; the intertwining of humans, worlds and situations; political activity and theory; the intersection of anthropology and philosophy; the drug war; artificial intelligence and ethics; and data ethics. These interests are taken up from the perspective of an anthropology strongly influenced by post-Heideggerian continental philosophy and critical theory, the theoretical articulation of which I name critical hermeneutics.

Sicoli

My research trajectory has grown from an interdisciplinary education in anthropology and linguistics along with my fascination with the place of language in human sociality. This has led me to develop methods of multimodal interaction and video analysis of embodied interaction within my ethnographic and documentary work, and also to develop historical linguistic methods bearing on the study of prehistory.

Smith

I discovered Anthropology through an undergraduate course called “Cultures of the World.” While I remember very little about the class and the professor, I do recall the feeling of finding my “home.” Understanding came easily to me and I wanted to study, unlike other classes.
 

Scherz

I am a cultural medical anthropologist. My research and teaching interests are focused on how people construe and negotiate ethical problems of care. Through a diverse range of projects, I have explored: how people decide whom they should care for and how, how these values are instilled, and how they change over time.

Igoe

Jim Igoe holds a PhD in Anthropology from Boston University (2000). He has conducted field research on biodiversity conservation, community-based development, and grassroots social movements in Tanzania, Pine Ridge, South Dakota, and New Orleans Louisiana. His earlier work focused on conflicts between nature conservation and indigenous and local communities in diverse context. His more recent work concerns the ways in which spectacles of nature connect and disconnect peoples' experiences of their place in the world at diverse and interconnected scales and locales.

Most

My primary research interests are concerned with the study of change over time in prehistoric economic and settlement systems. I am particularly concerned with the study of spatial and technological organization of prehistoric foraging societies, the impact of the adoption of agricultural strategies by foraging societies, and the role of hunting in emergent complex societies. My avenue into the study of these processes has been the systematic study of stone tool procurement, production, and use.

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