1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Graduate Student

Palazzo

I received a BS in biology with minors in classical archaeology and German from the University of Michigan (2010). In 2006 I became involved in the Pompeii Archaeological Research Project: Porta Stabia (see link below) as a member of the environmental team collecting, processing, and analyzing faunal material from the site. As of 2012 I am responsible for leading the environmental team in the field. I have also excavated on the island of Sardinia as part of Progetto Pran’e Siddi and in Tuscany at the Roman villa of Poggio del Molino.

McCarty

My dissertation research focuses on inter-household social organization at the Kazane Höyük excavations, directed by Prof. Patricia Wattenmaker. Outside modern Sanliurfa, Turkey, Kazane is home to one of the world's largest known settlements belonging to the Halaf cultural horizon (5200-4500 BCE uncalibrated, 5900-5350 cal. B.C.E.). The Halaf flourished in Southeastern Turkey, Northeastern Syria and Northern Iraq during the transitional Late Neolithic/Early Chalcolithic periods.

LaHatte

Development aid advocates a normative ethos of professionalism that foregrounds equality between providers and recipients while discouraging personal relationships that could lead to accusations of corruption, nepotism, and dependency. These personal relationships are understood to undermine the inculcation of values such as transparency and accountability that are encouraged by development aid providers.

Dennis

My current research is situated within the context of Nepal’s ongoing transition from Hindu monarchy to secular democracy. Specifically, I focus on the ways in which Brahmans, as a historically privileged group due to their high caste status, are negotiating new ideas of citizenship that integrate Hinduism and secularism. The particular ethnographic settings in which I work include emerging Hindu festivals and a private Brahman-run school.

Cieslak

Hailing from Albuquerque, New Mexico, I received my BA in South Asian studies (emphasis in Hindi) and English literature in May 2011 from the University of Iowa. I first became interested in the “toilet problem” in India as part of my undergraduate Honors thesis, which explored the confluence of forces that contributed to inadequate public facilities for women in Pune.

Brant

I hold a BA degree in anthropology from UCLA (2006), and a MA from Cal State University, Northridge (2009). My MA research was conducted in Tarapaca Valley, Northern Chile where I examined rock art sites as a means for understanding the economic and ideological reorganization that followed Tiwanaku's collapse. Shifting my regional focus slightly, my doctoral research will focus on Late Intermediate Period (A.D. 1000-1450) Collao ritual architecture in the Titicaca Basin of southern Peru.

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