1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Socio-cultural

Eisenstein

My dissertation project is an ethnography of pregnancy in Mbarara, Uganda, a fast-growing city of some 60,000 people in southwestern Uganda. Two earlier researches studied: 1) the politics of memory and place in a post-industrial city in the mid-Atlantic US; and 2) bureaucratic constructions of difference in American healthcare. Across all three projects, a semiotic approach informs the way I think about the circulation, reformulation, or endurance of particular forms of social connection.

Bloch

My research centers the study of the past (and present) on Indigenous peoples’ knowledges and ongoing relationships with ancestral mound landscapes, working in partnership with descendant peoples of an eastern Muskogee (Creek) community in Florida, Georgia, and Alabama. Thousands of these earthen mounds sit across eastern North America, constructed by Native American peoples over the previous five thousand years.

Kavadias

Amidst the current national economic crisis, Greeks who predict the end of the olive industry redouble their commitment to growing olives on family-owned lands, incurring personal debts and spurring relatives in Athens to migrate ‘back’ home to labor in the groves. These investments and commitments suggest that, for Greeks, olive cultivation resonates beyond just the monetary, but is getting mobilized in culturally meaningful ways in the turmoil.

House

Selected Publications:

  • 1936 - The development of sociology. Westport, Conn., Greenwood Press.
  • 1936 - Some methods of studying race and culture. (Reprinted from Social Forces, Vol. 15, no. 1, Oct. 1936.)
  • 1935 - Pareto in the development of modern sociology. Journal of Social Philosophy, v. 1, no. 1.
  • 1929 - The range of social theory; a survey of the development, literature, tendencies and fundamental problems of the social sciences. New York, Holt.

Title: Papers of Floyd Nelson House [manuscript], 1919-1974.

Winter

Although the occasional anthropologist made his way through the University of Virginia (Eric Wolf wrote his masterpiece Sons of the Shaking Earth while here) the first serious anthropologist to plant himself in the Lawn of Thomas Jefferson’s University was Edward H. Winter. Born in 1923, Winter graduated from Harvard in 1944.  He was a LT(J.g) in the Navy from 1944-1946, serving in the Pacific.

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