1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Socio-cultural

Rolando

I am a sociocultural anthropologist interested in the politics of Indigenous/settler relations in Lowland South America, with a focus on Indigenous ideas of personhood, relatedness, and morality. Based on nineteen months of ethnographic fieldwork with the Mastanawa people of the Upper Purus River (Brazilian-Peruvian border), my work examines the Mastanawa experience of the encompassing society through analysis of their quotidian interactions with their neighbors and narratives of their contact process.

Questa

I studied Ethnology at the National School of Anthropology and History (ENAH) of Mexico, mainly because I enjoy learning from other people by living with them, which I guess defines me as an ethnographer. My first ethnographic experience was among the Warihó of the Sierra Tarahumara in northern Mexico attesting their social organization and cultural resilience under the extreme violence of drug trafficking.

LaHatte

Development aid advocates a normative ethos of professionalism that foregrounds equality between providers and recipients while discouraging personal relationships that could lead to accusations of corruption, nepotism, and dependency. These personal relationships are understood to undermine the inculcation of values such as transparency and accountability that are encouraged by development aid providers.

Huang

My current dissertation project investigates the complex relations among land, gender, traditional hierarchy, and state bureaucracy in Yap (Wa’ab), Federated States of Micronesia. I aim to analyze an international tourist development project in Yap, which has provoked local cleavage along the lines of gender, race, states and cultures. In this project, I hope to unravel the gendered subjectivities encompassed in local hierarchy.

Hedges

My dissertation research examines the cultural logics and analytical categories according to which Beninese men and women conceptualize government corruption. Corruption is frequently criticized in Beninese newspapers, on television and radio programs, and in daily, informal conversation. But the pervasive public condemnation of corruption coexists with an equally prevalent celebration of mέjomέ, a prestigious social title given to elected public officials who redistribute significant sums of material wealth to Beninese experiencing privation.

Donahue Singh

Sociocultural Anthropology

Regional focus: South Asia, India.

Topical interests: Reproduction, kinship studies, medical anthropology.

Dennis

My current research is situated within the context of Nepal’s ongoing transition from Hindu monarchy to secular democracy. Specifically, I focus on the ways in which Brahmans, as a historically privileged group due to their high caste status, are negotiating new ideas of citizenship that integrate Hinduism and secularism. The particular ethnographic settings in which I work include emerging Hindu festivals and a private Brahman-run school.

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