1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Socio-cultural

Kaut

I am retired from active participation in the daily doings of the department. I have been spending most of my time since 1993 living on the White Mountain Apache Reservation (Fort Apache) in central eastern Arizona. I am associated with the tribal adult education center there as a consultant and still maintain a living site with research and writing facilities on a quarter acre lot provided by tribe. When I am there I am available via E-mail on a daily basis.

Oliver

I am interested in Western biomedical practice and how social and cultural factors influence the delivery of those health services and the health outcomes of those services. In particular, I am interested in the physician-patient interaction. I seek to look at the discourse between patient and physician to shed light on how communicative practice in the medical setting leads to diagnostic and treatment decisions. In this regard, I am interested in integrating cognitive anthropological approaches with interpretive ethnography.

Fraser

In my study of African American traditional midwifery, I worked in the historical archives to explore early southern medical narratives of obstetric progress and eugenic surveillance using these official texts as a counterpoint to older African American women's domestic dialogues about birthing and the body. My collaboration with colleagues in the school of medicine focuses on the social and cultural dimensions of the Human Genome Project. Here I am particularly committed to unraveling the threads of the public response to new genetic technologies and therapeutics.

Wagner

Since the completion of my field research in New Ireland I have been interested in the objective basis of subjective phenomena like thought, imagery, representation, and symbolism. It is the difference between the objectivity of the event or encounter and the way it gets to be represented later in thought, reflection, and writing that turns real or pragmatic happening into an empirical copy of itself, into an "experience" of self and other.

Douglass

Most of my work in socio-cultural anthropology has been in Spain. Before I began graduate school in symbolic anthropology, I had lived in Spain for eight years. This early experience with Spain, especially Barcelona, complemented my later field work there. My first book, Bulls, Bullfighting and Spanish Identities (University of Arizona Press, 1997), used bullfighting as a vehicle to explore the many Spanish national and local identities as made manifest through patron saint festivals, the main context for bullfights and other taurine spectacles.

McKinnon

As a cultural anthropologist, my research and writing have long been focused on issues relating to kinship, marriage, and gender. I am fascinated by their cross-cultural and historical diversity, by their centrality in the structures and dynamics of hierarchy and equality, and by the way scientific texts have transformed their culturally specific manifestations into universal facts of nature.

Turner

I am an anthropologist engaged in the study of ritual, religion and consciousness. I have been researching the field of symbol and ritual for 58 years, formerly in collaboration with Victor Turner. My theoretical interests have developed from Turner's "anthropology of experience," a field that has been spreading in anthropology to narratology, humanistic anthropology, and the anthropology of consciousness.

Bashkow

I’m currently writing a book, The Corporate Form, which gives a fresh answer to the vexed question of what is a corporation, providing a humanistic conception of the corporation that is more versatile and well-founded than the individualistic, finance-centric, market-like models current in economics and law. Although corporations are often thought of as vehicles for commerce requiring sanction of law, their history is much older than their adaptation to pursue profit.

Handler

I am a cultural anthropologist who studies modern western societies. My initial fieldwork was in Quebec (1976-1984) where I studied the Québécois nationalist movement. This has led to an enduring interest in nationalism, ethnicity, and the politics of culture. Upon coming to Virginia in 1986, I pursued the latter topic by looking at history museums. Beginning in 1990, I worked with Eric Gable (Ph.D. Virginia 1990) and Anna Lawson (Ph.D. Virginia 1995) on an ethnographic study of Colonial Williamsburg, which is both an outdoor museum and a mid-sized nonprofit corporation.

Damon

Muyuw, 1996 - with Amoen, "Sipum,"
hunter, woodsman and guide, deceased 2009.
Please see the beginning of my book:
Trees, Knots and Outriggers: Environmental Knowledge in the Northeast Kula Ring.

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