1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Courses Fall 2017


Undergraduate Courses
(meet major area requirements)


 

Full Course Descriptions:

ANTH 1010     INTRO. TO ANTHROPOLOGY     3.0     IGOE
TR 8:00-8:50 AM

This course introduces students to the methods, perspectives, and motivations used by anthropologists to study the range and significance of human existence. Students are challenged to follow the way anthropologists approach a research topic, design a question, collect data, and ultimately discuss results via publication. The course surveys the four sub-fields of anthropology (linguistic anthropology, socio-cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and archaeology) through a combination of texts, multimedia, and guest lectures. The goal of this course is to equip students with an analytical framework which allows the objective appreciation of non-Western languages, social structures, histories and belief systems.

ANTH 2190     DESIRE AND WORLD ECONOMICS    3.0    MENTORE
MW 11:00-11:50 AM

Because of the current woeful lack of understanding about the economies of other societies, this course offers an insight into the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services practiced by peoples ignored or unknown to classic Western economics. Its principle focus will open upon the obvious differences between cultural concepts of the self and the very notion of its desire. Such arguments as those which theorize on the “rationality” of the market and the “naturalness” of competition will be debunked through the critical purvey of alternative subjectivities. More substantively the course will present societies of the gift, barter, and monetary exchange; the morality of consumption; the value and ethics of production; to name but a few of the topics covered.

ANTH 2230     FANTASY AND SOCIAL VALUES     3.0     WAGNER
TR 9:30-10:45 AM

An examination of imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Attention is given to "alternate cultures" and fictional societal models. A "cultural imaginary" allow us to think carefully about implications of gender, technology, and social existence that we, for very good reasons, are not allowed to experiment upon. Three papers, mandatory attendance in lecture.

ANTH 2250   NATIONALISM, RACISM, MULTICULTUARLISM   3.0    HANDLER
MW 10:00-10:50 AM

Introductory course in which the concepts of culture, multiculturalism, race, racism, and nationalism are critically examined in terms of how they are used and structure social relations in American society, with particular attention to current debates in the U.S. and Europe over immigrants, refugees and national borders.

ANTH 2280     MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY     3.0     RASCHIG
MW 12:00-12:50 PM

This course is an introduction to medical anthropology. It will teach you to analyze how social, cultural, political, and economic factors impact the body. It will also show you how these factors shape the ways people understand, experience, and respond to states of health and disease. In addition to exploring the medical systems of other cultures, we will also reflect on biomedicine as a cultural artifact.

ANTH 2340   ANTHROLOGY OF BIRTH AND DEATH   3.0   KHARE
M 3:30-6:00 PM

A discussion of distinct bio-cultural, medical anthropological, and social-economic-moral justice issues surrounding today’s human rites of passage. The course will pursue the bio-cultural, medical anthropological, competitive economic-environmental, and salient social justice issues in its main sections. These will be focused on (a) child birth and birthing; (b) the transforming traditional sex-gender status and identity issues; (c) “eating-drinking-living up” as “rites of passage” in university student life; (d) daily lives and health care issues for the American migrant food worker; and (e) on and about human dying, death and afterlife. The class members will have opportunities for conceptual learning and group discussions, experiential individual or group experiential projects and related writings.

ANTH 2400    LANGUAGE AND CULTURE    3.0    SICOLI
MWF 10:00-10:15 AM

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Course includes a plus obligatory discussion section. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

ANTH 2420     LANGUAGE AND GENDER     3.0     CONTINI-MORAVA
MW 3:30-4:45 PM

In many societies, features of pronunciation, vocabulary choice, and/or communicative style are used as social markers of gender identity and differentiation.  We will take a cross-cultural perspective, comparing language use within the U.S. and in other parts of the world, especially non-Western societies.  Questions to be addressed include: How does language use reflect or construct a person’s sex, gender, or sexual orientation? How does language contribute to the social construction of gender identity and difference in our and other cultures? What is the role of language in enabling, preventing, defining sexual violence?  How do gendered differences in language use, or the belief in differences, affect people’s lives/social identities? What social factors besides gender relate to language use, and how do they interact with gender?
Is language itself sexist?  If so, what can or should be done about it?

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Major Area Requirements

 

ANTH 2440   LANGUAGE AND CINEMA   3.0    LEFKOWITZ
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

This course takes a historical look at the role that speech and language have played in Hollywood movies. We will look at the artistic controversies, aesthetic theories, and technological challenges that attended the transition from silent to sound films as a backdrop to the main discussion of how gender, racial, ethnic, and national identities were constructed and reproduced through the representation of speech, dialect, and accent. This course provides an introduction to the study of semiotics but requires no knowledge of linguistics or of film studies.

ANTH 2470  REFLECTIONS OF EXILE   3.0   LEFKOWITZ
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required.

ANTH 2541   LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND HEALING  3.0   EISENSTEIN
TR 4:00-5:15 PM

This course is an introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. For about three-fourths of the course we will discuss linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax) among a wide variety of languages; the classification of African languages; and the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory. For the last fourth of the course we will address a range of sociolinguistic topics, including language and social identity, social functions of language, verbal art, the politics of language planning, and the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth. While lectures address general and comparative topics, each student will choose one language to focus on, using published materials available in the library. This language will be the basis for the major assignments.

ANTH 2560  HIERACHY AND EQUALITY   3.0   KHARE
W 3:30-6:00 PM

 
As a part of Medical Anthropology, this course explores the overlapping crucial issues of HIERARCHY AND EQUALITY in major human health care cultures, especially by focusing on selected developing and developed nations and cultures. Beginning with a discussion of cultural/moral relativism in different medical systems, we will focus on (a) a comparative examination of the American and other advanced health cultures for their comparative technological-social-economic-moral care values and ways; (b) women’s changing reproductive rights in US; (c) “global surrogacy” as a “labor market,” discounting natural motherhood; and (d) the changing ethnographies of and anthropological explanatory perspectives on mental illnesses.
 
The course encourages comparative individual or student group initiated research projects, with emphases on distinct inequalities experienced in health care. 

ANTH 2590-02   SPIRITUAL KINSHIP     3.0    BROACH
MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

This class moves beyond biological relatedness to discuss how kinship and families are created through the spiritual and the sacred. Students utilize classical texts in the Anthropology of Religion, Spirituality, and Kinship to consider how ritual processes such as séances, possession, and baptism can construct kinship.  We ask: What is the role of the divine in building networks of kin that are related through substances other than "blood"

ANTH 2590-03     GENDER IN THE MIDDLE EAST   3.0   BINTE-FARID
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

The Middle East is often viewed through a gendered lens due to the legacy of colonialism and orientalist scholarship. In this course, we will use ethnographic examples and postcolonial scholarship to investigate gendered constructions of national identity, spread of religious movements, expansion of neoliberal capitalism, calls for revolutionary changes, and more.
 

ANTH 2590-05  PRIVILEGE    3.0    FLOOD
TR 2:00-3:15 PM 

Privilege is a contentious and often confusing idea for people across the political spectrum. This course asks, what is privilege, and what should you do with it if you have it? What if you don't have it? Is it a problem or a way to solve problems? We will investigate the meaningful distinctions between different kinds of privilege, focusing on their histories and on their reproduction and embodiment in everyday life.

ANTH 2590-06      EVERYDAY RESISTANCE      3.0     REYNOLDS
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

This course surveys a variety of 'everyday forms of resistance,' including those  considered newsworthy or those more mundane or private, those that catalyze a movement and those that do not, those rendered invisible by mainstream society and those that receive our collective attention for various reasons.  A focus will also be on how we, as participants in everyday life, affect and are affected by, everyday resistance.

 

ANTH 2800    INTRO. TO ARCHAEOLOGY    3.0    LAVIOLETTE
TR 9:30-1020 AM

Anthropological archaeology contributes to the anthropological project through study of past societies often very different from our own. Through many kinds of research, archaeologists (re-)construct the broad sweep of human experience and history, mostly before the advent of written records, or beyond their reach in more recent times. Combining a broad range of humanistic questions with scientific methods, archaeology offers perspectives on such things as daily life, religion, economy, worldview, and social relations in the past, by gleaning insights from the analysis of artifacts, environmental data, structures, and landscapes and how they change over time. Archaeology is visible to the public: from archaeologists in film, to bioarchaeology and forensic science on ‘Bones’, to archaeological tourism sites around the globe.
Archaeology is thus familiar--but how does it actually work? How do we “read” meaning into the past from the critical analysis of a fragmentary skeleton of a Neanderthal child and the objects placed in its grave, remnants of a meal cooked 10,000 years ago in North America, or changes in the styles of megalithic monuments in Europe? What are archaeology’s unique contributions?

 

ANTH 3010    THEORY AND HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY   4.0   IGOE
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

This course is designed for students who are majoring in anthropology. It presents a broad historical outline of major theoretical approaches in the field, from the late 19th century to the present. These approaches will be examined in relation to both evolving debates within the discipline, and the larger historical, cultural and intellectual contexts in which they were produced, and which they to some degree reflect; we will also discuss the enduring relevance of these theories. The course stresses close reading of primary texts and emphasizes in particular the critical analysis of these texts' arguments. The discussion section is obligatory. This is a required course for anthropology majors.

ANTH 3130  DISEASE, EPIDEMICS AND SOCIETY   3.0   SHEPHERD
TR 12:30-1:45PM

Topics covered in this course will include emerging diseases and leading killers in the twenty-first century, disease ecology, disease history and mortality transitions, the sociology of epidemics, the role of epidemiology in the mobilization of public health resources to confront epidemics, and the social processes by which the groups become stigmatized during disease outbreaks. This is a course that seeks to present a holistic view of global health by drawing on work crossing several disciplines, including anthropological demography, epidemiology, public health, disease history, genomic studies of disease pathogens, and medical anthropology. The written work for this course will fulfill the second writing requirement; the requirement is not completed, however, until you submit a completion form with your final paper (the form is available at Monroe Hall or on-line).

ANTH 3152    AMAZONIAN PEOPLES    3.0    MENTORE
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

Analyzes ethnographies on the cultures and the societies of the South American rain forest peoples, and evaluates the scholarly ways in which anthropology has produced, engaged, interpreted, and presented its knowledge of the 'Amerindian.'

ANTH 3155    ANTHROPOLOGY OF EVERYDAY AMERICAN LIFE    3.0    DAMON
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

This course uses anthropological models to analyze aspects of the US experience in North America and its extension into the world. The models will be drawn primarily from anthropology’s analysis of production and exchange relations, rites of transition, sacrifice and mythology. Because of the tone and result of the 2016 Presidential election and the course of the Trump administration, the focus this year will be on the rituals and ideologies that center what we experience as our political system. Although introduced by issues drawn from these immediate conditions, the course has a serious historical orientation, beginning with the Second Great Awakening (ca1800-1840). The tension between Trump and Clinton was not novel, though it was for its participants. This is a reading and writing course and will fulfill the Second Writing Requirement.

ANTH 3255 ANTHROPOLOGY OF TIME AND SPACE  3.0   DAMON
MW 3:30-4:45 PM

All societies position themselves in space and time. This course samples the anthropological discussion of the ways social systems have configured spatial/temporal orders.  We will consider calendars and associated astronomical beliefs, house, village, city forms and related conscious elaborations. Although examples will be taken from many different societies, including modern US and Western societies, considerable time will be spent focusing on the temporal and spatial systems that ran from China to Australia. The course may have a single midterm; will have a major oral report and one major research paper to be done individually or jointly with two or more students. 

ANTH 3395   MYTHODOLOGY    3.0   WAGNER
TR 12:30-1:45 PM  

Mythodology: A participatory crash-course in the obviation skill set: how to “solve” a myth or story as if it were a topological mind-puzzle. All the student is required to do is furnish a myth or story of their own choosing, analyze it in class presentation, and prepare a final paper on the subject. Class attendance mandatory.
 

ANTH 3559   ANTHROPOLOGY PREGNANCY, BIRTH AND POSTPARTUM  3.0  FRASER
TR 11:00-12:15 AM

There is no debate that human reproduction is a biological universal, but it is also an intensely cultural phenomenon with widely disparate, and often contested, cultural routines, symbolic systems, ideas and practices whether focused on mothers, fathers, infants or communities or who is recognized as a birthing expert. This course examines physiological and cultural processes globally and explores both the individual experiences and systemic patterns associated with the phases of reproduction from pregnancy through to the post-partum.

ANTH 3589-01  ARCHAEOLOGY OF NOW   3.0   HANTMAN
TR 3:30-4:45 PM

This course looks at the study of material culture as it broadens our understandings of contemporary issues in societies around the world.  These include race, consumerism, nationalism, indigeneity, and involvement in truth and reconciliation efforts.   We will look cross-culturally at the logics of exhibiting archaeological collections today in museums of conscience where the narratives link past to present.  We will review current policies concerning what constitutes an important archaeological site and the implications of preservation theory.
Archaeological methods used in forensic and environmental studies are also reviewed.

ANTH 3589-02  ARCHAEOLOGY OF FOOD AND DRINK  3.0   WATTENMAKER
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

We all need food to survive.  However, what we eat, how we eat it, and whom we share our means with are infused with cultural meanings.  This course explores food and drink as a window into the symbolic, social, economic and political structures of ancient societies.  We will explore the methodologies used by archaeologists to investigate ancient foodways, and gain a temporal perspective on changing consumption patterns. Archaeological evidence will provide insight into the ways that food and drink are culturally transformed through social practices, as well as the ways that foodways have themselves contributed to cultural change.

ANTH 3590-01    ANTHROPOLOGY OF GENOCIDE    3.0    FRASER
MW 5:00-6:15 PM

It may seem ethically distasteful to study the culture of genocide; but its origins, aftermath and context derives from human beliefs, action and interaction at individual, community and state levels. Anthropology can illuminate the cultural underpinnings of this complex, dark phenomenon and possibly how to predict and prevent its occurrences. This course will examine the officially and unofficially recognized incidents of genocide and use anthropological theories and cultural frameworks to explore how and why these acts of targeting particular human beings  for annihilation occur. We will also explore questions of memory, justice and reconstruction of lives in post-genocidal societies.

ANTH 3590-02     SPIRITUAL KINSHIP         3.0      BROACH
MWF  9:00-9:50 AM

TBA

ANTH 3590-03   PRIVILEGE     3.0      FLOOD
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

TBA

ANTH 3590-04    INDIGENOUS NORTH AMERICAN ARTS     3.0     GREEN
R 1:00-3:30 PM

Indigenous North American Arts. (Introduction to art histories of indigenous North America and of collecting Native arts with close material analysis of objects in the Fralin museum collection.) 

 

ANTH 3603   ARCHAEOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO ATLANTIC SLAVERY   3.0   NEIMAN
W 3:30-6:00 PM

This course explores how archaeological and architectural evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of the slave-based societies that evolved in the early-modern Atlantic world from the 17th through early-19th centuries. The primary empirical focus is on the Chesapeake and the British Caribbean, the later exemplified by Jamaica and Nevis. The course covers recent contributions to the historical and archaeological literatures on the lives of enslaved people, as well as theoretical models of human behavior and basic analysis techniques that jointly are required to make and evaluate inferences about the meaning of material evidence. The course is structured around a series of research projects that offer students the opportunity to use historical knowledge, theoretical grounding, and methodological skills in the analysis of real data from the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (www.daacs.org). The class format combines lectures, discussion, and computer workshops.

ANTH 3630   CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGON   3.0    SHEPHERD
MW  3:30-4:45 PM  

Prerequisite: Anthro 101 or equivalent social science or China-related course.  This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Heavy emphasis is on the ethnography from Taiwan where traditional forms have endured and been studied intensively. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of traditional Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety.  The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered.  Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in twentieth century Chinese life.

ANTH 3830   NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY    3.0    HANTMAN
MW 3:30-4:45 PM

This course provides an overview of the contributions of archaeology to our understanding of the long-term cultural history of the Americas.   In this course the emphasis is on the regions of modern day Canada, the United States, Northern Mexico and the Caribbean.  After a brief review of the history of archaeological research in the western hemisphere we will examine articles and monographs (case studies) that provide detailed analysis of: 1) the peopling of the Americas during the late Ice-Age; 2) continuity and change in precolonial and colonial-era Amerindian societies. and 3) the archaeological study of Euroamerican, African-American and Native American communities in the colonial era and relationship to contemporary politics of indigeneity and sovereignty.  

ANTH 4420   THEORIES OF LANGUAGE   3.0   CONTINI-MORAVA
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

We will survey a number of modern “Western” schools of linguistics, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals its adherents set themselves, the assumptions they make about the nature of language, and the relation between theory, methodology and analytical practice.  The main focus is on theories of grammar, but we will also discuss some phonological theories whose theoretical concepts are applied to grammar and beyond.

ANTH 4590   SEX, SPIRITS, AND SORCERY   3.0   SKERRITT
M 10:00-12:30 PM

The art of northern Australia opens a window onto a world in which ancestral spirits remain a constant presence in the land. These narratives contain all the drama of a Hollywood epic: struggles over life and death, love and lust, all within simmering magic of the tropics. Using the world-class holdings of the Kluge-Ruhe, this seminar explores the development of the art of Arnhem Land from 1911 to the present.
 

ANTH 4591-01    ANIMALS: GOOD TO THINK    3.0    DOUGLASS
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

Animals: Good to Think will be a seminar on the anthropology of human cultural relations with animals. It is inspired in part by the recent research and theory in animal studies.  The seminar will emphasize only a few of many possible themes, such as animals as symbol, animals as spectacle and sport, animals as domesticates, “pets” and food, and animals as scientific object. We will especially emphasize horses.

ANTH 4591-02  ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE MIDDLE EAST   3.0  WATTENMAKER
W 6:30-9:00 PM

This seminar course explores the ways that Middle Eastern ethnographies have contributed to anthropological debates on topics such as history and memory, tribalism gender, religion and secularism, colonialism, nationalism, and markets.  We will examine the portrayals of Middle Eastern societies in the Western world and consider how this has changed through time.  Second, we will explore the relevance of archaeological and historical research and narratives to our understanding of modern communities in the Middle East.  A series of archaeological studies, ethnographies and films will highlight the heterogeneous and temporally dynamic nature of Middle Eastern societies, as well as the anthropological issues confronted by these works.

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Major Area Requirements

 

ANTH 5475  MULTIMODAL INTERACTION    3.0   SICOLI
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

Students will build knowledge and practice of the analysis of peoples’ joint-engagement in embodied interactions. We examine the history of the use of film and video in interaction analysis and the affordances of these media for examining spatiotemporal configurations of talk, techniques of body action, and tool use in social interaction. How does action weave together multiple sensory modalities into semiotic webs linking interactions with more durative institutions of social life? What are the theoretical consequences for an anthropology that takes the multimodal construction of meaning seriously? Course includes workshops on video recording, and the transcription and coding of both verbal and non-verbal actions. Transcript analysis “data sessions” will be conducted throughout the term, allowing student to hone their analytical skills for video analysis. Students will work on projects incorporating video production and analysis.

ANTH 5559   RELATIONAL ETHICS     3.0     ZIGON
TR 3:30-4:45 PM

TBA

 

 


 

 

Back to courses offered

Course Number Index

Courses that meet Major Area Requirements:


Prin. of Social Analysis   Archaeology Linguistics
2190, 2230, 2250, 2280,2340,2560,2590-02,2590-03,3130,3152,3155,3255,3395,3559,
3590,3630,4590,5559

 

2800,3589-01,3589-02,3603,3830 2240,2400,2420,2470,2541,4420

Major Requirements
1010,3010,4591-01,4591-02

Beyond the West
(for the major: note that some of these courses do not meet the College's Nonwestern requirement)
2250,2280,2400,2470,2590-01,2590-02,3152,3589-02,4590,4591-02
Senior Seminars
4591-01, 4591-02


Graduate Courses


Full Course Descriptions:

 

ANTH 5475  MULTIMODAL INTERACTION    3.0   SICOLI
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

Students will build knowledge and practice of the analysis of peoples’ joint-engagement in embodied interactions. We examine the history of the use of film and video in interaction analysis and the affordances of these media for examining spatiotemporal configurations of talk, techniques of body action, and tool use in social interaction. How does action weave together multiple sensory modalities into semiotic webs linking interactions with more durative institutions of social life? What are the theoretical consequences for an anthropology that takes the multimodal construction of meaning seriously? Course includes workshops on video recording, and the transcription and coding of both verbal and non-verbal actions. Transcript analysis “data sessions” will be conducted throughout the term, allowing student to hone their analytical skills for video analysis. Students will work on projects incorporating video production and analysis.

ANTH 5559   RELATIONAL ETHICS     3.0     ZIGON
TR 3:30-4:45 PM

This course considers the possibility of a relational ethics.  Taking the so-called ethical-turn of anthropology as it's starting point, this course will explore what a possible future relational ethical theory might be.  This will be done through a seminar style class focused on the close reading  and group discussion of anthropological and continental philosophical literature on ethics/morality and relationality
 

ANTH 7010     HISTORY THEORY I     3.0     BASHKOW
TR 11:00-12:15 PM

This course is the first half of the graduate core sequence in the History of Anthropological Theory, covering from the beginning of human time until approximately the mid-20th century. By careful reading of period works we will learn about the philosophical roots of the two great streams of western social theory, prefiguring the conflict between social evolutionism and cultural particularism in the 20th century. We will study different national traditions of anthropology, emphasizing the U.S., France, and Britain, and trace the early trajectory of major approaches and debates in the field. We will be concerned to understand anthropological theories not only as frameworks for understanding other cultures, but also as reflections or commentaries upon the culture of those who produced them. The course stresses close reading, analysis, and discussion of primary texts. This is a required course for entering anthropology graduate students.

ANTH 7040  ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS     3.0    BASHKOW
TR 5:00-6:15 PM

This seminar on the crafting of research methods is strongly encouraged for PhD students in their second or third year. It will consider a mix of (a) conceptual issues like what is distinctive to the anthropological practice of ethnography; (b) techniques and exercises in interviewing, observation, note-taking, and writing; and (c) practical and ethical challenges of fieldwork including getting research permission, choosing where to stay, presenting one’s research to the community, reciprocating assistance, anticipating and mitigating research risks, selecting proper equipment, budgeting money and time, negotiating conflicts and power dynamics, recording and transcribing, and preparing to write.

ANTH 7060     DISSERTATION RESEARCH PROPOSAL WORKSHOP   3.0   LAVIOLETTE
W 4:30-7:00 PM

A workshop for graduate students preparing dissertation proposals and writing grant applications.

ANTH 7130   DISEASE, EPIDEMCS AND SOCIETY    3.0   SHEPHERD
TR 12:30-1:45 PM

Topics covered in this course will include emerging diseases and leading killers in the twenty-first century, disease ecology, disease history and mortality transitions, the sociology of epidemics, the role of epidemiology in the mobilization of public health resources to confront epidemics, and the social processes by which the groups become stigmatized during disease outbreaks. This is a course that seeks to present a holistic view of global health by drawing on work crossing several disciplines, including anthropological demography, epidemiology, public health, disease history, genomic studies of disease pathogens, and medical anthropology. The written work for this course will fulfill the second writing requirement; the requirement is not completed, however, until you submit a completion form with your final paper (the form is available at Monroe Hall or on-line).

ANTH 7400    LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY   3.0   DANZIGER
M 3:30-6:00 PM

This is an advanced introduction to the anthropological study of language. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically oriented research. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language and world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, universals and particulars in language, language and social identity, the social construction of reality through everyday conversation, and the study of poetic language. Through readings and discussion, the implications of each of these topics for the general conduct of anthropology will be addressed. Evaluation is based on take-home essays and problem-sets which are assigned throughout the semester. The course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology graduate students and the theory requirement for Linguistics graduate students. 

ANTH 7420     THEORIES OF LANGUAGE     3.0     CONTINI-MORAVA
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

We will survey a number of modern “Western” schools of linguistics, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals its adherents set themselves, the assumptions they make about the nature of language, and the relation between theory, methodology and analytical practice.  The main focus is on theories of grammar, but we will also discuss some phonological theories whose theoretical concepts are applied to grammar and beyond.

ANTH 7589    ARCHAEOLOGY OF FOOD AND DRINK   3.0    WATTENMAKER
TR 2:00-3:15 PM

We all need food to survive.  However, what we eat, how we eat it, and whom we share our means with are infused with cultural meanings.  This course explores food and drink as a window into the symbolic, social, economic and political structures of ancient societies.  We will explore the methodologies used by archaeologists to investigate ancient foodways, and gain a temporal perspective on changing consumption patterns. Archaeological evidence will provide insight into the ways that food and drink are culturally transformed through social practices, as well as the ways that foodways have themselves contributed to cultural change.

ANTH 7630   CHINESE FAMILY AND RELIGON   3.0    SHEPHERD
MW  3:30-4:45 PM  

Prerequisite: Anthro 101 or equivalent social science or China-related course.  This course will introduce students to anthropological analysis of the traditional forms of the Chinese family and popular religion, and their modern transformations. Heavy emphasis is on the ethnography from Taiwan where traditional forms have endured and been studied intensively. Topics to be covered include the dynamics of traditional Chinese marriage and domestic life, gender roles, the religious underpinnings of Chinese family life in ancestor worship and the Chinese cult of the dead, marriage rituals, and the cult of filial piety.  The forms of temple worship, the interaction of the Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions, and the shamanic tradition will also be covered.  Finally, attention will be paid to the changing role of the family and religion in twentieth century Chinese life.